for my project I need to build a tree structure. I am looking for a way to grow it at the leaves. I have simplified my failed attempt by using a listy structure:

my $root = a => (b => (c=> Nil));
my $here := $root;
while $here.value ~~ Pair {
  $here := $here.value;
}
$here = d => Nil;

which does not work, because I cannot change Nil, of course. Cannot assign to an immutable value How can I make this work?

Thanks, Theo van den Heuvel

  • Have you considered using hashes? or is the order important? – Elizabeth Mattijsen May 9 at 11:06
  • Yes I have, Elizabeth. And I am. At some point I have to change a value somewhere in that hash by a new bit of structure. Hence my question. – Theo van den Heuvel May 9 at 11:12
  • Well if the project is to make a Tree I'd probably go with some kind of Node Role that can have 2 sub nodes. Then I'd include the functionality of adding new Nodes as an object method. – Scimon May 9 at 12:12
  • In my attempt to minimize the problem, I have evidently made it harder. It appears, you cannot alter the value of a Pair. Right? Normally you would change it may creating a slightly altered clone. Using hashes as building blocks makes it much easier, because you can alter, insert and delete pairs as a whole. – Theo van den Heuvel May 9 at 12:37
  • If you really need Nil could you stick it inside a variable? – Christopher Bottoms May 9 at 12:44
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think the error message you get "Cannot assign to an immutable value" is because the value is not a container. Here is an example where I make the leaf node a container:

my $root = a => (b => (my $ = (c => Nil)));
my $here := $root;
while $here.value ~~ Pair {
  $here := $here.value;
}
$here = d => Nil;

Now, there is no error message.

  • thanks, Håkon. On the basis of this reply and @Elizabeth, I am going to pick hashes as nodes. and add keys rather than try to change values. – Theo van den Heuvel May 9 at 13:30
  • @TheovandenHeuvel Regardless of what you are choosing to do with your project, this answer best answers your basic question. Please accept it as the correct answer so that anyone in the future that makes the same mistake will easily find this answer! – Trevor Clarke May 9 at 15:29

You are using binding, not assignment for $here

my $root = a => (b => (c=> Nil));
my $here = $root;
while $here.value ~~ Pair {
  $here = $here.value;
}
$here = d => Nil;

When you use bind, the left and the right-hand side are the same object. And once they are the same object, well, they can't change (if the bound object is immutable, that is). They're immutable:

my $bound := 3; $bound = 'þorn'; say $bound; 
# OUTPUT: «Cannot assign to an immutable value␤» 

3 above is immutable, so you can't assign to it. In the code you have provided, you could change the value by rebinding until you arrived to an immutable value, the last Pair, which explains the message.

Just use ordinary assignment and you're good to go. If what you want is to keep the original value of $root somewhere, just do this and use $root to do the tree navigation

my $root = a => (b => (c=> Nil));
my $here = $root;
while $root.value ~~ Pair {
  $root = $root.value;
}
$here = d => Nil;
say $here;
say $root; 

$here will still be equal to the original root, and $root will have navigated to the last branch and leaf.

  • indeed. No error message. But sadly $root is unchanged. – Theo van den Heuvel May 9 at 15:46
  • So that is why you wanted to use binding... Just use $root from the beginning. I'll edit it for that. – jjmerelo May 9 at 16:04
  • "When you use bind, the left and the right-hand side are the same object. And once they are the same object, well, they can't change. They're immutable". Well, if the bound object is immutable then it's still immutable after binding. But you can still just bind to another instead that isn't. You may well know that anyway, but I thought it best to comment in case anyone misunderstands what you've written. – raiph May 9 at 16:29
  • @raiph Changed. Hope it's better now. Thanks. – jjmerelo May 9 at 16:51
  • thanks. I guess I was thinking "reference" in the back of my head. NB the last assignment should be to $root instead of $here. – Theo van den Heuvel May 9 at 19:56

On the basis of valuable input from @Elizabeth, @Håkon and @jjmerelo I have created an example tree implementation.

my @paths = <<aap-noot-mies aap-noot-hut aap-juf tuin>>;

my %root;
for @paths -> $fn {
  my @path = $fn.split: '-';
  add-to-tree(@path);
}

print_tree(0, %root);

sub add-to-tree(@path) {
  my %tmp := %root;
  for @path -> $step {
    unless %tmp{$step}:exists {
      my %newtmp;
      %tmp{$step} = %newtmp;
    }
    %tmp := %tmp{$step};
  }
}

sub print_tree($ind, %from) {
  my $margin = ' ' x $ind;
  if %from {
    for %from.kv -> $k, $v {
      say "$margin$k:";
      print_tree($ind + 1, %$v);
    }
  } else {
    say "$margin.";
  }
}

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