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I am trying to understand the working of this simple AES encryption code and the vulnerabilities that it might face.

public static void main(String ... args) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, NoSuchPaddingException, InvalidKeyException, IllegalBlockSizeException, BadPaddingException {
        1) String key = "/AbCd17%%/gvg8(";
        2) byte[] keyBytes = key.getBytes();
        3) SecretKeySpec secretKeySpec = new SecretKeySpec(keyBytes, "AES");
        4) Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
        5) cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, secretKeySpec);
        6) byte[] ciphertext = cipher.doFinal("Message".getBytes());
        7) System.out.println(ciphertext);
    }

So far i think the problems lie in the following:

-> Lines 2 & 6 using getBytes() instead of encoding the key/plaintext first with getBytes("UTF8"), but how exactly does this pose a threat?

-> In line 4 we are using ECB mode(default mode) which is insecure, so instead we should use other modes like OCB,CTR etc.

-> Can the exceptions listed cause any vulnerabilities? and what more am I missing?

I am new to this stuff and would appreciate any help.

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For the start - you may try to peek at my blog over encryption in Java, it is very basic but at least you will get some hints how to do encryption properly

1) String key = "/AbCd17%%/gvg8(";
2) byte[] keyBytes = key.getBytes();

Simple key.getBytes() would work until using characters which are printable under the default system encoding.

There is another (bigger) problem - you are using a static String key which is limiting keyspace to the printable characters. You should be using byte[] for keys and generated by a KeyGenerator or at least SecureRandom.

The key may be as well password based, for that you may have a look at the linked blog how to generate a key from the password. (or search for PBKDF2)

4) Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES"); -> In line 4 we are using ECB mode(default mode) which is insecure, so instead we should use other modes like OCB,CTR etc.

IMHO the best practice is to explicitly specify operation mode and padding, such as AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding. I am not sure what is the standard if you don't specify any (some ciphers are using the ECB mode as default, I am not sure for AES).

Other than ECB modes are using IV (initialization vector). IV is generated randomly when not specified (you could read it from the cipher object). IMHO the best practice is create a random IV, use it explicitly with the encryption and decryption. It makes the code much more readable.

The IV is to be provided along the ciphertext.

6) byte[] ciphertext = cipher.doFinal("Message".getBytes()); 7) System.out.println(ciphertext);

You cannot just print a byte array, you need to encode the data somehow (base64, hex, ..)

and what more am I missing?

What you may be still missing is a mac (message authentication code) which is often neglected, but I found it very important, here are some options.

  • Probably worth mentioning that a hard coded key is a weakness (even when it's byte[]). Easy to extract from the source or byte code and hard to change. – Henry May 9 '18 at 12:23
  • @Henry indeed, you see, some things we consider granted without questioning :) Sure it is worth mentioning.. (especially when someone commits cloud service keys into a public git repo :P) – gusto2 May 9 '18 at 13:11

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