1

If I stack a number of boxes (divs) together using float: left and set border: 1px solid black, there will be a 2px border between adjacent boxes. (Between boxes vertically, and also horizontally when boxes move to the next line.)

//html
<div class=boxes>
  <div class="box">1</div>
  <div class="box">1</div>
  <div class="box">1</div>
  <div class="box">1</div>
  <div class="box">1</div>
  <div class="box">1</div>
  <div class="box">1</div>
  <div class="box">1</div>
  <div class=last></div>
</div>

//css
.boxes {
  display: inline-block;
}

.last {
  clear: both;
}

.box {
  width: 200px;
  height: 50px;
  border: 1px solid gray;
  line-height: 50px;
  text-align: center;
  float: left;
  position: relative;
}

How can I achieve a similar layout with only a single pixel border between adjacent blocks?

I thought to add a "top left" border to the parent container, and then only set "right bottom" border for individual boxes. This partly works, but if the list of boxes flows over to the next line, then there will be a visible line on the top.

.boxes {
  border-top: 1px solid gray; 
  border-left: 1px solid gray;   
  display: inline-block;
  overflow: hidden;
}

.last {
  clear: both;
}

.box {
  width: 200px;
  height: 50px;
  border-bottom: 1px solid gray;
  border-right: 1px solid gray;
  line-height: 50px;
  text-align: center;
  float: left;
  position: relative;
}
2

Codepen demo

Basically the outer container just set the left border and the inner boxes have a border on the other sides (not the left one). The trick is to shift all those blocks with a negative margin-top: -1px and place a padding-top: 1px on the parent container (so you can still see the top border of the first row).

I've also removed the empty element you inserted only for clearing purpose: height: auto and overflow: hidden on the parent container is enough (or look for the clearfix class which doesn't affect the overflow)


Markup

<div class=boxes>
  <div class="box box1">1</div>
  <div class="box box2">1</div>
  <div class="box box3">1</div>
  <div class="box box4">1</div>
  <div class="box box1">1</div>
  <div class="box box2">1</div>
  <div class="box box3">1</div>
  <div class="box box4">1</div>

</div>

CSS

.boxes {
   height: auto;
   overflow: hidden;
   padding: 1px 0 0 0;
   border-left: 1px solid gray;
}



.box {
  width: 200px;
  height: 50px;
  border: 1px solid gray;
  border-left: 0;
  line-height: 50px;
  text-align: center;
  float: left;
  position: relative;
  margin-top: -1px;
}

if you try to resize the viewport the borders are never overlapping.

1

You can use a trick with border-box and float the elements to be more responsive

.boxes {
  float: left;
}
.box {
  height: 50px;
  width: 200px;
  float: left;

  box-shadow: 
    1px 0 0 0 gray, 
    0 1px 0 0 gray, 
    1px 1px 0 0 gray, 
    1px 0 0 0 gray inset, 
    0 1px 0 0 gray inset;
}

Example

  • I think the example is not correct: some borders are missing – Fabrizio Calderan May 9 '18 at 13:22
  • @fcalderan yes you are right, my example was not responsive at all. I've modified it a bit. – Artur Capraro May 9 '18 at 13:41
0

All you need is:

.boxes {
  margin-top: 1px;
  margin-left: 1px;
}

.box {
  width: 200px;
  height: 50px;
  border: 1px solid gray;
  line-height: 50px;
  text-align: center;
  float: left;
  margin-top: -1px;
  margin-left: -1px;
}
<div class=boxes>
  <div class="box box1">1</div>
  <div class="box box2">1</div>
  <div class="box box3">1</div>
  <div class="box box4">1</div>
  <div class="box box1">1</div>
  <div class="box box2">1</div>
  <div class="box box3">1</div>
  <div class="box box4">1</div>
</div>

There is no need to add any other borders to anything but to .box directly and margin will do the magic

EDIT: If you are making your design pixel-perfect then you should make your .boxes like:

.boxes {
  margin-top: 1px;
  margin-left: 1px;
  margin-bottom: -1px;
  margin-right: -1px;
}

and it will cancel out any effect created by margins

  • Is code snippet not working as intended if you run it? If so - what browser are you using? – NoOorZ24 May 10 '18 at 5:59
  • It does not work in Firefox or Chrome. There are thick lines between some boxes.. Which browser are you using? – RaelB May 10 '18 at 11:57
  • @RaelB well for me it works on Google Chrome, Firefox, Edge and IE. Just to be sure: you are viewing it on snippet or tried implementing it somewhere else? – NoOorZ24 May 10 '18 at 12:04
  • Both. Perhaps your screen resolution is too high, you can't notice this issue – RaelB May 10 '18 at 15:39
  • @RaelB Nop, same results are on my home and work PC. is your zoom set to 100%? check by ctrl + 0 – NoOorZ24 May 10 '18 at 17:08
-1

Here is how I'll do it, using a CSS variable, because it's cool:
(See comments in my code)

/* Added CSS variable, because it's nice to modify only here if needed */
:root{
  --border: 1px solid gray;
}

.boxes {
  display: inline-block;
  width: auto;
  margin: auto;
  /* Added the below to make .last useless */
  height: auto;
  overflow: hidden;
  /* Added for borders */
  border-top: var(--border);
  border-left: var(--border);
}

.box {
  width: 200px;
  display: inline-block;
  height: 50px;
  line-height: 50px;
  text-align: center;
  float: left;
  position: relative;
  /* Added for borders */
  border-right: var(--border); 
  border-bottom: var(--border);

}
<div class=boxes>
  <div class="box box1">1</div>
  <div class="box box2">1</div>
  <div class="box box3">1</div>
  <div class="box box4">1</div>
  <!-- <div class="last"></div> No need for that -->
</div>

Hope it helps.

  • You should try to look what happens if you have two or more lines of boxes – Fabrizio Calderan May 9 '18 at 13:41
  • @fcalderan I modified and added a CSS variable, because it's cool. Can you help me on the issue where the parent is wider than its childs when on several lines? – Takit Isy May 9 '18 at 13:56

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