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I'm trying to build an asynchronous codec. I have implemented a job dispatcher that has access to a buffered channel of jobs

var JobChannel chan Job = make(chan Job, 100000)

the dispatcher takes as input the number of workers and assigns work to them

func StartDispacher(numberOfWorkers int){
    // start workers
    wg := &sync.WaitGroup{}
    wg.Add(numberOfWorkers)
    for i := int(1); i <= numberOfWorkers; i++ {
        go func(i int) {
            defer wg.Done()
            for j := range JobChannel {
                doWork(i, j)
            }
        }(i)
    }
}

my main function starts the dispatcher and keeps giving it jobs to do (in this case 200000 jobs)

workDispatcher.StartDispacher(2*runtime.NumCPU())
for i := 0; i < 200000; i++ {
    j := workDispatcher.Job{
        BytePacket: d,
        JobType:    workDispatcher.DECODE_JOB,
    }
    workDispatcher.JobChannel <- j
}

after experimenting: turns out there are 2 factors that affect the performance of this code

  • the size of the buffered channel JobChannel
  • the number of workers there are func StartDispacher(numberOfWorkers int)

Is there a standard way to find the optimal values for these parameters, and is it possible to make these values independent from the physical set-up of the machine running the code?

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  • 1
    the optimal values are completely dependent on your system and requirements. As for making them "independent from the physical set-up", can you explain what you mean? You can certainly make the values configurable.
    – JimB
    May 9, 2018 at 20:47
  • I mean is there some sort of a formula that I can implement as code with input values to give me the optimal size and workers number
    – Mheni
    May 9, 2018 at 20:50
  • In something close to 99.999% of cases, what is "optimal" is whatever you can release soonest. In other words: Optimizing for, say, 1% faster throughput, might cost 2 weeks of additional man hours. That's a pretty expensive improvement, for most applications. Put yet another way: Don't forget the time it takes to measure performance when optimizing. Your developer time is often better spent elsewhere. May 10, 2018 at 12:47

3 Answers 3

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You always need to measure to determine how the system will perform under load. The good news here is that you only have 2 variables, which are mostly independent, so it's fairly easy to reason about.

The number of workers determines your concurrency, so benchmark the processing to see what the optimal concurrency is. There is usually a number of concurrent processes above which the returns drop off dramatically.

The size of the channel is just like any other "buffer" in a system. A larger buffer can handle larger spikes in input, at the expense of possibly inducing larger latencies and memory usage.

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  • so the answer would be to just manually test multiple combinations of the two variables and stick to the one that works the best?
    – Mheni
    May 9, 2018 at 21:01
  • 1
    @Mheni but the best for one specific CPU won't likely be the best for other CPUs, and I'm even not taking into account the memory system.
    – lilezek
    May 9, 2018 at 21:02
  • @Mheni, I would automate the tests, and remember that the results are only valid for the system you tested as a whole.
    – JimB
    May 9, 2018 at 21:04
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In practice, I find that there are three buffer sizes that matter: 0, 1, and “an upper bound on the total number of sends”.

0 gives synchronous behavior.

1 gives asynchronous behavior: it's useful in a select statement with a default case.

An upper bound on the total number of sends gives guaranteed-non-blocking behavior: you can send to it without a select without risking a goroutine leak.

Other numbers may provide marginally better throughput, but at scale they're still going to contend on the cache line containing the channel's internal mutex, and they'll be more likely to mask potential deadlocks and goroutine leaks.

3
  • 1
    As an aside, I find that a semaphore is usually preferable to a worker pool: that simplifies cleanup and allows you to write synchronous functions with less risk of leaking goroutines. See godoc.org/golang.org/x/sync/… for an example.
    – bcmills
    May 9, 2018 at 22:33
  • Could you clarify what you mean by "1 gives asynchronous behavior"?
    – Maxpm
    Dec 24, 2020 at 16:49
  • 1
    I mean that with a buffer size of 1, the sender can place an item in the buffer and resume execution, and the receiver can later remove an item from the buffer and resume execution. Neither side of the channel necessarily needs to block on the other, especially if a select with a default case is used.
    – bcmills
    Feb 12, 2021 at 19:50
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The answer is no. The optimal setup will be dependent not only on the software you run in doWork (how much CPU intensive and IO that function will depend) but also on how much instructions can your hardware execute and how much IO can your system deal with.

Meaning that it could depend on what your system has or has not an SSD installed or even your bandwidth if your system performs activities involving internet access, how much physical cores your CPU(s) have, etc...

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  • 1
    that is true but as a codec i only depend on CPU and memory (not using any IO, or network). with that in mind is it possible to find the right channel size for any machine x
    – Mheni
    May 9, 2018 at 20:57
  • Then still you have memory access, L1 and L2 caches, and the number of physical cores.
    – lilezek
    May 9, 2018 at 20:58

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