11

Steps taken so far:

  • Set up new user pool in cognito
  • Generate an app client with no secret; let's call its id user_pool_client_id
  • Under the user pool client settings for user_pool_client_id check the "Cognito User Pool" box, add https://localhost as a callback and sign out url, check "Authorization Code Grant", "Implicit Grant" and everything under "Allowed OAuth Scopes"
  • Create a domain name; let's call it user_pool_domain

Create a new user with a username/password

Now, I can successfully go to:

https://{{user_pool_domain}}.auth.us-east-2.amazoncognito.com/oauth2/authorize?response_type=code&client_id={{user_pool_client_id}}&redirect_uri=https%3A%2F%2Flocalhost

This presents me with a login page and I am able to login as my user which returns me to https://localhost/?code={{code_uuid}}

I then try the following: curl -X POST https://{{user_pool_domain}}.auth.us-east-2.amazoncognito.com/oauth2/token -H 'Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded' -d 'grant_type=authorization_code&redirect_uri=https%3A%2F%2Flocalhost&code={{code_uuid}}&client_id={{user_pool_client_id}}'

However, this just returns back the following: {"error":"unauthorized_client"}

The token endpoint docs say that unauthorized_client is because "Client is not allowed for code grant flow or for refreshing tokens." which is confusing because I checked the boxes allowing the client to use the code grant flow.

  • 3
    As Andrew noted, you can get this error when there is a problem with the redirect_uri. Using localhost has never been a problem for me, but I do get this (rather misleading) error message whenever I omit the trailing slash on the redirect_uri when calling the token endpoint. Can you try adding %2F to the end of the redirect_uri? – Mike Patrick May 10 '18 at 14:53
  • 1
    @MikePatrick WOW thank you so much! It was the missing trailing slash. That's a frustratingly bad error message that I lost a day on but it actually works now!!! – TranquilMarmot May 10 '18 at 15:46
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So, it turns out that the user pool has to have a trailing slash (https://localhost/) and then that trailing slash has to be used in all of the callback URLs. Then it decides to work!

  • You saved my day. The redirect_uri should be exactly the same as we define in Cognito console – rioastamal Oct 26 at 3:06
4

Everything looks OK to me. I think it may be complaining about the Authorization header missing but not sure. You could try a few things:

1) According to this page (https://docs.aws.amazon.com/cognito/latest/developerguide/token-endpoint.html), you shouldn't need to send the Authorization header in the token request, but maybe it is still needed. You could try either passing just the client ID in it (Authorization [client ID]) or configure a secret and try passing Authorization [client ID:client secret] like it says). It usually makes sense to use a client secret for authorization code flow anyway since in this flow, there is a server side component that can securely handle the token exchange.

2) Try using Implicit Flow instead to see if that works. Implicit Flow makes sense for single page apps with no server side component. For that, no client secret is needed.

  • I've tried it with the clientID:clientSecret base64 encoded as the Authorization header with no luck. How would I go about using the Implicit Flow? What's the difference? – TranquilMarmot May 10 '18 at 3:21
  • I noticed that AWS API Gateway will throw an "unauthorized" error if the redirect URI is not accessible. Now that I think about it, trying to use localhost may be a problem. Think about it ... AWS would need to redirect to that page but it can't because localhost is on your local machine. I would try a non-localhost URL to see if that is causing the problem. – Andrew May 10 '18 at 3:31
  • Here is info about the differences between authorization code flow and implicit flow: stackoverflow.com/questions/16321455/… – Andrew May 10 '18 at 3:32
  • If you want to use Implicit Flow, then it is similar to what you just did except the last step is not needed. Instead, you would receive the token from the first request. It is provided in what is known as a URL fragment. The URL fragment can only be read by browsers. This fragment contains the token(s). – Andrew May 10 '18 at 4:03

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