23

I want to check if a type is instantiation of a particular template during compilation.

For example:

  1. std::vector<int> is instantiation of std::vector
  2. std::array<int, 5> is instantiation of std::array

I can make a test that works for case 1 but does not work for case 2.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <array>
#include <queue>
template<template<typename...> class, typename...>
struct is_instantiation : public std::false_type {};

template<template<typename...> class U, typename... T>
struct is_instantiation<U, U<T...>> : public std::true_type {};

int main() {
    using A = std::vector<int>;
    std::cout << is_instantiation<std::vector, A>::value << "\n";
    std::cout << is_instantiation<std::queue, A>::value << "\n";
    // std::cout << is_instantiation<std::array, A>::value << "\n";
}

How to make it work for both cases?

I tried auto, but can't make it work.

Advantages of auto in template parameters in C++17

  • 15
    If you are only interested in STL container types, you will have to make a special case for array - as far as I can remember, it's the only template container which accepts non-type template parameters. If you are interested in any templates, I do not see a way to make it work, as there is no common syntax for type and non-type templates. – SergeyA May 11 '18 at 5:09
2

Spezialized std::array size

The only way I see is to make specialized Array classes with pre-defined array sizes. Something like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <array>
#include <queue>
template<template<typename...> class, typename...>
struct is_instantiation : public std::false_type {};

template<template<typename...> class U, typename... T>
struct is_instantiation<U, U<T...>> : public std::true_type {};

template <class T> class My5Array {
    public:
    My5Array() { }
    private:
    std::array<T, 5> arr;
};

template <class T> class My10Array {
    public:
    My10Array() { }
    private:
    std::array<T, 10> arr;
};

int main() {
    using A = std::vector<int>;
    using B = My5Array<int>;
    std::cout << is_instantiation<std::vector, A>::value << "\n";
    std::cout << is_instantiation<std::queue, A>::value << "\n";
    std::cout << is_instantiation<My5Array, A>::value << "\n";
    std::cout << is_instantiation<My5Array, B>::value << "\n";
    std::cout << is_instantiation<My10Array, B>::value << "\n";
}

prints

1
0
0
1
0

Of course, there are disadvantages:

  • possibly waste of memory due to fixed array size
  • multiple classes needed for desired array sizes
  • usage of non-standard type MyXArray
  • obviously an instance of My5Array cannot be an instance of My10Array at the same time (see var B in code above)

1st possible alternative: std::dynarray

I have also found std::dynarray, which could work instead of std::array, but I think that it is not yet included in the latest C++ standards. Maybe worth keeping an eye on it.

2nd possible alternative: just let it drop

The standard container available are possibly sufficient for most applications.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.