112

I have a .net application which is connecting to the SQL Server using windows authentication.

We cannot use SQL Server authentication in the application. We have lot of Active Directory users there for our project. So we have to create separate login account for each Active Directory users in SQL Server rather than creating separate login account for each AD users, is there any way to use the active directory user group in SQL Server?

167

In SQL Server Management Studio, go to Object Explorer > (your server) > Security > Logins and right-click New Login:

enter image description here

Then in the dialog box that pops up, pick the types of objects you want to see (Groups is disabled by default - check it!) and pick the location where you want to look for your objects (e.g. use Entire Directory) and then find your AD group.

enter image description here

You now have a regular SQL Server Login - just like when you create one for a single AD user. Give that new login the permissions on the databases it needs, and off you go!

Any member of that AD group can now login to SQL Server and use your database.

17
  • Is there any chance to create groups in mysql like above? – uzay95 Jul 17 '12 at 11:14
  • 2
    Thank you for a very clear answer with annotated screen shots! I wish all answers were like this... – NickG Jan 17 '13 at 15:13
  • 1
    @NickG: I used the free Paint.NET to load the image and insert the rounded red rectangles – marc_s Apr 4 '13 at 20:54
  • 7
    This doesn't work for me. I have a Windows Group "DataAccess", which "UserX" is a member of. I created a login for DataAccess group and set the login's user mapping to have public, datareader, and datawriter access on a database. The user can't log in. If I add the user specifically, and assign the exact same mapping permission, then he can log in. When I click on Securables > Effective Permissions for the group, it says "Cannot execute as the server principal because the principal 'GroupName' does not exit, this type of principal cannot be impersonated, or you do not have permission." – Triynko Jun 5 '13 at 19:48
  • 2
    @Tim: the user's name - it's still the user that logs in - he's just not permissioned directly - as a user - but by being member of that group that has permissions – marc_s Jul 16 '20 at 15:59
22

You can use T-SQL:

use master
GO
CREATE LOGIN [NT AUTHORITY\LOCALSERVICE] FROM WINDOWS WITH
DEFAULT_DATABASE=yourDbName
GO
CREATE LOGIN [NT AUTHORITY\NETWORKSERVICE] FROM WINDOWS WITH
DEFAULT_DATABASE=yourDbName

I use this as a part of restore from production server to testing machine:

USE master
GO
ALTER DATABASE yourDbName SET OFFLINE WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE
RESTORE DATABASE yourDbName FROM DISK = 'd:\DropBox\backup\myDB.bak'
ALTER DATABASE yourDbName SET ONLINE
GO
CREATE LOGIN [NT AUTHORITY\LOCALSERVICE] FROM WINDOWS WITH
DEFAULT_DATABASE=yourDbName
GO
CREATE LOGIN [NT AUTHORITY\NETWORKSERVICE] FROM WINDOWS WITH
DEFAULT_DATABASE=yourDbName
GO

You will need to use localized name of services in case of German or French Windows, see How to create a SQL Server login for a service account on a non-English Windows?

2
  • In case you also need to set the database level login/principal, here's another answer I found useful dba.stackexchange.com/a/2578/60876 – Agostino Oct 5 '16 at 10:31
  • I wonder if this can be used to grant a certain active directory group read access to a certain schema - in pseudo sql CREATE LOGIN ... WITH DEFAULT_SCHEMA the dots ... have to reference a certain ad group. We have several groups and would like to give an active directory group accountants access to schema ´A´ but not to schema ´B´ and ´C´. Likewise group ´billing` should only have access to schema ´B´. As a frontend we are using msft access. – surfmuggle Oct 27 '17 at 8:54
1

Here is my observation. I created a login (readonly) for a group windows(AD) user account but, its acting defiantly in different SQL servers. In the SQl servers that users can not see the databases I added view definition checked and also gave database execute permeation to the master database for avoiding error 229. I do not have this issue if I create a login for a user.

1
  • That could have been commented rather than using a answer. But you can't comment yet. So don't haha ^^ – finnmglas May 13 '20 at 4:46
0

Go to the SQL Server Management Studio, navigate to Security, go to Logins and right click it. A Menu will come up with a button saying "New Login". There you will be able to add users and/or groups from Active Directory to your SQL Server "permissions". Hope this helps

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.