1

I'm a beginner.

Could you tell me why this script works even though the i variable is not defined in the ip not in i case?

The script compares a list of ARP table match_data (which I get from a paramiko ssh connection), and my ip list match_ip. I just want to print the IP MAC, and if the IP is not in the ARP list table to print ip + "NO MAC ADDRESS".

for ip in match_ip:
    for i in match_data:
        if ip in i:
            print  re.search((ip+'\s+'),i).group(0),mac.search(i).group(0)
            break
    if ip not in i:
        print ip + '           NO MAC ADDRESS'

Output

C:\Python27\python.exe C:/Python2/Get_mac_from_arp.py
!!!Connecting SSH!!!
10.240.184.103           30e4.db80.b699
10.240.184.104          7c2f.802d.61e5
10.240.184.105          7c2f.8072.40fc
10.240.184.106          e05f.b982.5720
10.240.178.11           NO MAC ADDRESS
10.240.184.177          e05f.b982.5752
10.240.184.178          7c2f.802a.782a
10.240.184.179          30e4.db80.b6ec
10.240.184.180          7c2f.802a.782b

Process finished with exit code 0
6
  • 2
    Please verify that the indentation is correct. – Anton vBR May 11 '18 at 11:23
  • 2
    What do you mean by "the i variable is not defined?" In Python you don't declare variables – John Coleman May 11 '18 at 11:23
  • Why do you say that "the "i" variable is not defined in the (ip not in i) case". i still has the value it had at the end of the for loop. – PM 2Ring May 11 '18 at 11:24
  • Because, given that your indentation is correct, the i in if ip not in i: takes the last value of i it had in for i in match_data: – zipa May 11 '18 at 11:25
  • 1
    i is a very poor name for this variable – Reblochon Masque May 11 '18 at 11:28
1

The name i is still valid at that point. It has the last value that it got assigned in the for loop. However, there's no need to actually have that if test following the loop. Python for and while loops take an optional else clause which is entered if the loop terminates normally, i.e. it isn't exited early due to a break statement (or a return statement).

So we can re-write that code as:

for ip in match_ip:
    for i in match_data:
        if ip in i:
            print  re.search((ip+'\s+'),i).group(0),mac.search(i).group(0)
            break
    else:
        # We can only get here if the `break` didn't happen
        print ip + '           NO MAC ADDRESS'

I suppose you expected a for loop to create a new scope, with the loop index and other variables created in the loop only existing in that scope. In some languages (especially those closely related to C) a new block creates a new scope, but that doesn't happen in Python with normal for loops. Python is more conservative with creating scopes, because they aren't as "cheap" to do as they are in C. A function definition creates a new local scope, and so does a class definition. However, a generator expression does run in its own scope, and so does a list comprehension in Python 3, in Python 2 a list comprehension runs in the scope of the surrounding code.

You can read about scopes and namespaces in the official tutorial.


BTW, you should seriously consider migrating to Python 3, Python 2 reaches its official End of Life some time in 2020.

2
  • I just merely understand why the "else" case is not expected under the "if ip in i" as an alternative action =) And why is "break" word is necessary here (without break the script doesnt work properly) – Dover May 11 '18 at 12:50
  • 2
    @Dover The Python interpreter knows that the else belongs to the for and not the preceding if because of the indentation. So you need to be very careful not to mess the indentation up when using else with for or while! The break is necessary because otherwise control will automatically go into the else block when the for terminates. Also break makes the code more efficient because we don't want to keep testing for matches after we've already found a match. – PM 2Ring May 11 '18 at 13:14
1

even though the "i" variable is not defined in the (ip not in i) case?

It is actually defined - by the for i in match_data statement.

4
  • 4
    This is example why one should name their variables properly instead of using i and j in every for loop. – Joonatan Samuel May 11 '18 at 11:27
  • Isnt the last "if" case must be under the "for i in match_data"? – Dover May 11 '18 at 11:29
  • 1
    @Dover Loops do not create a scope in Python – Chris_Rands May 11 '18 at 11:30
  • @Dover: depends on the expected result, but that's another question. Note that if you want it in the inner loop, it would be better written as an else clause. – bruno desthuilliers May 11 '18 at 11:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.