1

can i sort random array using only one loop without using sort function ??? but can i do the same using one for loop ? how can i do that ? here i'm use nested loop

$(document).ready(function () {
  function sortarr(arr) {
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
      for (var j = i + 1; j < arr.length; j++) {
        if (arr[i] > arr[j]) {
          var temp = arr[i];
          arr[i] = arr[j];
          arr[j] = temp;
        }
      }
    }
    return arr;
  }
  console.log(sortarr([10, 18, 4, 5, 9, 6, 16, 12]));
});
  • Why don't you want to use sort? – Get Off My Lawn May 11 '18 at 20:05
  • console.log(sortarr([10,18,4,5,9,6,16,12]));}); what's going on with this line here? – Sterling Archer May 11 '18 at 20:06
  • 1
    I mean, I guess technically, you can keep resetting your array counter back to the beginning until the array is sorted, rather than using nested loops.. but the big O time complexity would be the same. What is your use-case? – mhodges May 11 '18 at 20:08
  • 1
    That depends on what you mean by one loop. Any comparison sort's time complexity is bounded from below by n * lg n therefore you can't sort it by just one loop, that would be sorting in n time complexity. – Matus Dubrava May 11 '18 at 20:09
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    @ammarammary Just about every built-in sort function to any language uses a quick sort or merge sort (or something similar), which is O(n*log(n)). The exact implementation in JavaScript is browser-dependent, as it is not defined in the spec. – mhodges May 11 '18 at 20:16
0

If you are interested, this is how you might implement your own quicksort.

But note that using default js sort would be much faster than any implementation that you can do yourself (most probably) as that sort is optimized to run as fast as possible. This is just an implementation of a generic textbook quicksort.

const quicksort = arr => {

  const _partition = (arr, begin, end) => {
    let pivot = begin;
    for (let i = begin; i <= end; i++) {
      if (arr[i] < arr[begin]) {
        pivot++;
        [arr[pivot], arr[i]] = [arr[i], arr[pivot]];
      }
    }
    [arr[begin], arr[pivot]] = [arr[pivot], arr[begin]];
    return pivot;
  }

  const _quicksort = (arr, begin, end) => {
    if (begin < end) {
      const pivot = _partition(arr, begin, end);
      _quicksort(arr, begin, pivot - 1);
      _quicksort(arr, pivot + 1, end);
    }
  }

  _quicksort(arr, 0, arr.length);
}

const arr = [10, 18, 4, 5, 9, 6, 16, 12];
quicksort(arr);
console.log(arr);

And you can make it a little bit faster (in some cases) by randomizing the pivot selection like this.

const quicksort = arr => {

  const _partition = (arr, begin, end) => {
    let pivot = begin;
    for (let i = begin; i <= end; i++) {
      if (arr[i] < arr[begin]) {
        pivot++;
        [arr[pivot], arr[i]] = [arr[i], arr[pivot]];
      }
    }
    [arr[begin], arr[pivot]] = [arr[pivot], arr[begin]];
    return pivot;
  }

  const _randomizedPartition = (arr, begin, end) => {
    const index = Math.floor(Math.random() * (end-begin)) + begin;
    [arr[begin], arr[index]] = [arr[index], arr[begin]];
    return _partition(arr, begin, end);
  }

  const _quicksort = (arr, begin, end) => {
    if (begin < end) {
      const pivot = _randomizedPartition(arr, begin, end);
      _quicksort(arr, begin, pivot - 1);
      _quicksort(arr, pivot + 1, end);
    }
  }

  _quicksort(arr, 0, arr.length);
}

const arr = [10, 18, 4, 5, 9, 6, 16, 12];
quicksort(arr);
console.log(arr);

1

You could do mergesort with one loop only:

function mergeSort(arr) {
  if(arr.length < 2) return arr

  const a = mergeSort(arr.slice(0, arr.length / 2)),
             b = mergeSort(arr.slice(arr.length / 2));

 const result = [];

  while(a.length && b.length)
    result.push((a[0] > b[0] ? a : b).shift());

  return result.concat(a, b);
}

But as outlined in the comments above, this won't be faster than an approach with multiple loops, probably slower.

0

Here's a chart showing various sorting algorithms and their complexities:

enter image description here

A single pass through a loop without recursion or nesting is O(n), so no, not in the worst case. There are other techniques for sorting that can be incorporated to sort an array using a single loop as Jonas W. shows, but their time complexity isn't necessarily as good as good old .sort() which is Quicksort.

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