20

I already wrote my script using asyncio but found that the number of coroutines running simultaneously is too large and it often ends up hanging around.

So I would like to limit the number of coroutines concurrently, and once it reaches the limit, I want to wait for any coroutine to be finished before another is executed.

My current code is something like the following:

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
p = map(my_func, players)
result = loop.run_until_complete(asyncio.gather(*p))

async def my_func(player):
    # something done with `await`

The players is of type list and contains many elements (say, 12000). It needs so much computational resource to run all of them simultaneously in asyncio.gather(*p) so I would rather like the number of players run simultaneously to be 200. Once it reaches 199, then I wish another coroutine starts to be executed.

Is this possible in asyncio?

4
9

I can suggest using asyncio.BoundedSemaphore.

import asyncio

async def my_func(player, asyncio_semaphore):
    async with asyncio_semaphore:
        # do stuff

async def main():
    asyncio_semaphore = asyncio.BoundedSemaphore(200)
    jobs = []
    for i in range(12000):
        jobs.append(asyncio.ensure_future(my_func(players[i], asyncio_semaphore)))
    await asyncio.gather(*jobs)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
    loop.set_debug(True)
    loop.run_until_complete(main())

This way, only 200 concurrent tasks can acquire semaphore and use system resources while 12000 tasks are at hand.

3
  • 12
    Note that you don't need a BoundedSemaphore - an ordinary Semaphore(200) will have the same effect. A BoundedSemaphore serves a different purpose - it is designed to differ from ordinary Semaphore by raising an exception (instead of blocking) when the semaphore is released more times than it was acquired. That cannot happen when it is only acquired/released using with. May 13 '18 at 8:02
  • 1
    @user4815162342 thanks for the info! I'll check it out. May 14 '18 at 12:32
  • Worked great for me, Thanks a lot. Sep 12 '20 at 6:10
4

You might want to consider using aiostream.stream.map with the task_limit argument:

from aiostream import stream, pipe

async def main():
    xs = stream.iterate(players)
    ys = stream.map(xs, my_func, task_limit=100)
    zs = stream.list(ys)
    results = await zs

Same approach using pipes:

async def main():
    results = await (
        stream.iterate(players) | 
        pipe.map(my_func, task_limit=100) |
        pipe.list())

See the aiostream project page and the documentation for further information.

Disclaimer: I am the project maintainer.

4

You can wrap your gather and enforce a Semaphore:

import asyncio

async def semaphore_gather(num, coros, return_exceptions=False):
    semaphore = asyncio.Semaphore(num)

    async def _wrap_coro(coro):
        async with semaphore:
            return await coro

    return await asyncio.gather(
        *(_wrap_coro(coro) for coro in coros), return_exceptions=return_exceptions
    )

# async def a():
#     return 1

# print(asyncio.run(semaphore_gather(10, [a() for _ in range(100)])))
# [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
2
  • 1
    That's a great option, thanks for putting out an option that doesn't require going into all of my coros.
    – Yablargo
    Apr 29 at 2:06
  • FYI, I've more recently come across aioitertools.asyncio.gather, allowing to limit concurrency in a less expensive manner. Use with caution though, as it's a rather custom implementation.
    – ddelange
    Apr 30 at 11:57

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