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I'm trying to get HashMap type of functionality to work with tensorflow. I got it to work when keys and values are of int type. But when they are arrays it gives error - ValueError: Shapes (2,) and () are not compatible on line default_value)

import numpy as np
import tensorflow as tf


input_tensor = tf.constant([1, 1], dtype=tf.int64)
keys = tf.constant(np.array([[1, 1],[2, 2],[3, 3]]),  dtype=tf.int64)
values = tf.constant(np.array([[4, 1],[5, 1],[6, 1]]),  dtype=tf.int64)
default_value = tf.constant(np.array([1, 1]),  dtype=tf.int64)

table = tf.contrib.lookup.HashTable(
        tf.contrib.lookup.KeyValueTensorInitializer(keys, values),
        default_value)

out = table.lookup(input_tensor)
with tf.Session() as sess:
    table.init.run()
    print(out.eval())
  • default_value should be a scalar value, not an array. – jdehesa May 14 '18 at 9:53
  • 1
    But my values are arrays. How would that make sense? And it also gives error: ValueError: Shape must be rank 1 but is rank 2 for 'key_value_init_4' (op: 'InitializeTable') with input shapes: [2], [3,2], [3,2]. – Mihkel L. May 14 '18 at 12:02
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    I've upvoted just because @MihkelL. actually posted an MCVE and it's so refreshing! :) – Peter Szoldan May 14 '18 at 16:35
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Unfortunately, tf.contrib.lookup.HashTable only works with one dimensional tensors. Here's an implementation with tf.SparseTensors, which of course only works if your keys are integer (int32 or int64) tensors.

For the values I'm storing the two columns in two separate tensors, but if you have many columns, you might want to just store them in a large tensor, and store the indices as values in one tf.SparseTensor.

This code (tested):

import tensorflow as tf

lookup = tf.placeholder( shape = ( 2, ), dtype = tf.int64 )
default_value = tf.constant( [ 1, 1 ], dtype = tf.int64 )
input_tensor = tf.constant( [ 1, 1 ], dtype=tf.int64)
keys = tf.constant( [ [ 1, 2 ], [ 3, 4 ], [ 5, 6 ] ],  dtype=tf.int64 )
values = tf.constant( [ [ 4, 1 ], [ 5, 1 ], [ 6, 1 ] ],  dtype=tf.int64 )
val0 = values[ :, 0 ]
val1 = values[ :, 1 ]

st0 = tf.SparseTensor( keys, val0, dense_shape = ( 7, 7 ) )
st1 = tf.SparseTensor( keys, val1, dense_shape = ( 7, 7 ) )

x0 = tf.sparse_slice( st0, lookup, [ 1, 1 ] )
y0 = tf.reshape( tf.sparse_tensor_to_dense( x0, default_value = default_value[ 0 ] ), () )
x1 = tf.sparse_slice( st1, lookup, [ 1, 1 ] )
y1 = tf.reshape( tf.sparse_tensor_to_dense( x1, default_value = default_value[ 1 ] ), () )

y = tf.stack( [ y0, y1 ], axis = 0 )

with tf.Session() as sess:
    print( sess.run( y, feed_dict = { lookup : [ 1, 2 ] } ) )
    print( sess.run( y, feed_dict = { lookup : [ 1, 1 ] } ) )

will output:

[4 1]
[1 1]

as desired (looks up the value [ 4, 1 ] for the key [ 1, 2 ] and the default value [ 1, 1 ] for [ 1, 1 ], which points to a non-existent entry.)

  • Yeah but since the key doesn't exist in the HashTable it should return default_value. So this isn't a working solution. This reshaping doesn't work for many example. If you think about it, it doesn't leave the logic working as it would be hashmap. for example if you change the keys list to [[1, 2],[1, 1],[5, 6]] it should work - in normal hashtable implementations- but it throws an error with your solution. :) – Mihkel L. May 25 '18 at 15:05
  • Oh you're right, haven't thought this through apparently. Let me think if I can come up with something else. Do we know anything about the contents of the indices tensors, e.g., are they integer, or have a max value? That would help a lot. – Peter Szoldan May 25 '18 at 18:43
  • Rewrote the answer with tf.SparseTensors. – Peter Szoldan May 25 '18 at 20:03

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