5

lets say I have two arrays

x = [1,2,3]
y = [0,1,0]

I need to divide the arrays element-wise, thus using numpy. My issue is the "secure division" implemented. when doing:

np.divide(x,y).tolist()

I get the output:

[0.0, 2.0, 0.0]

My problem with this is that I need it to return the element that is not 0 when it divides by 0, making the ideal output:

[1.0, 2.0, 3.0]

Is there any workaround to do this using numpy? Manually defining a function to do this, is there any optimized way to do this, without making a custom divide function (like the following) and using it on every pair of elements?

def mydiv(x, y):
if y == 0:
    return x
else:
    return x / y

NOTE: the reason Im worried about optimization is that this will run in the cloud, so resources are limited, and when having 300+ element arrays, doing this does not seem optimal at all.

  • 2
    300 elements is tiny. Are you actually running into performance issues? You say you have arrays, but you have list objects. I doubt that the cost of converting your lists to np.ndarray objects and then back to lists will be worth any speed-up for a 300ish element list... In fact, I suspect it will be significantly slower. – juanpa.arrivillaga May 13 '18 at 16:37
  • My problem is that i have tree structures, up to depth 7, with each node containing such lists. And having to perform operations such as this for every node in more than 2500 trees is heavy, so I am trying to reduce the calculations costs to a minimum. – eXistanCe May 13 '18 at 16:50
  • Yes, but I doubt this will be more performant, I suspect it will be less performant – juanpa.arrivillaga May 13 '18 at 16:56
4

A simple trick you can use:

x / (y + (y==0))

In action:

x = np.array([1, 5, 3, 7])
y = np.array([0, 2, 0, 4])

print(x / (y + (y==0)))

# [1.   2.5  3.   1.75]

Timings:

def chrisz(x, y):
  return x/(y+(y==0))

def coldspeed1(x, y):
  m = y != 0
  x[m] /= y[m]
  return x

def coldspeed2(x, y):
  m = ~(y == 0)
  x[m] /= y[m]
  return x

def coldspeed3(x, y):
  m = np.flatnonzero(y)
  x[m] /= y[m]
  return x

Results:

In [33]: x = np.random.randint(10, size=10000).astype(float)

In [34]: y = np.random.randint(3, size=10000).astype(float)

In [35]: %timeit chrisz(x, y)
29.4 µs ± 601 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

In [36]: %timeit coldspeed1(x, y)
173 µs ± 2 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

In [37]: %timeit coldspeed2(x, y)
184 µs ± 1.36 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

In [38]: %timeit coldspeed3(x, y)
179 µs ± 2.68 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
|improve this answer|||||
  • Comparing your answer to the one above, is it more "optimized"? Just asking because I really need to keep calculation costs to a minimum. – eXistanCe May 13 '18 at 16:58
  • From my timings this is faster. Depends on input data – user3483203 May 13 '18 at 17:04
  • Thank you very much, I'll do some timing tests then. As i have said to someone else who commented on the question, for small arrays is not an issue, but for thousands of 300/400 or even 800+ elements it becomes an issue – eXistanCe May 13 '18 at 17:07
  • 1
    Hey you did the analysis on the question from last night, it was only fair I took a turn ;) – user3483203 May 13 '18 at 17:27
  • 1
    Yeah, I had a little bone to pick with the accepted answer :p Is all good, thanks again! – cs95 May 13 '18 at 17:28
4

The easiest/fastest way to do this would be to just divide the values corresponding to a non-zero y-val.

x = [1, 2, 3]
y = [0, 1, 0]

x, y = [np.array(arr, dtype=float) for arr in (x, y)]

m = y != 0  # ~(y == 0) # np.flatnonzero(y)
x[m] /= y[m]

print(x)
array([1., 2., 3.])
|improve this answer|||||
  • @chrisz Think that's a typo by OP (2 / 1 = 2 ;-) ) – cs95 May 13 '18 at 16:44
  • @eXistanCe This is a good question. I think, cycles wise, this is likely shorter, but from a couple of quick tests it seems chrisz' answer is slightly faster. I would recommend doing a timing comparison on your data, it really depends. – cs95 May 13 '18 at 17:04
  • Thank you very much, I'll do some timing tests then. As i have said to someone else who commented on the question, for small arrays is not an issue, but for thousands of 300/400 or even 800+ elements it becomes an issue – eXistanCe May 13 '18 at 17:07
  • Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but this won't work for non-floats due to the nature of true_divide – user3483203 May 13 '18 at 17:08
  • @chrisz Yep, I made sure the inputs were cast to floats so this would work. Otherwise, you would need x[m] = x[m] / y[m] and you'd end up coercing x. – cs95 May 13 '18 at 17:11

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