2

I'm currently working in SFML for c++ and trying to resize a window however the solution I found to my problem doesn't quite feel right and I'm looking if there is a better way.

I have an object that gets resized multiple times so it may fit inside the window or not, I have to expand the window if its bigger and shrink it if its smaller. However I have a minimum size for the window, if the object fits inside that I want to reset the window to that size.

This is the pseudo-code I'm using right now:

if (Object.getSize().x > window.getSize().x || Object.getSize().y > window.getSize.y){
    if(Object.getSize().x > windowMinSize.x){
        window.resize(Object.getSize().x, window.getSize().y)
    }
    if(Object.getSize().y > windowMinSize.y){
        window.resize(window.getSize().x, Object.getSize().y)
    }
}
else{
    window.resize(windowMinSize);
}

I've looked into switch and other options but I haven't found what I'm looking for.

  • what is the question? – idclev 463035818 May 13 '18 at 19:54
  • This is the pseudo-code I'm using right now It's not pseudo-code if you are already using it. – DimChtz May 13 '18 at 19:55
  • @user463035818 it's not really a question. I'm looking for a better solution, just to learn. – P I N C O May 13 '18 at 19:59
  • 1
    if it is not a question it is offtopic here. If this is working code you can try here: codereview.stackexchange.com – idclev 463035818 May 13 '18 at 20:00
  • @DimChtz It's more complicated in the actual code, it's just the general sense of what I'm doing, that's why I called it pseudo-code. – P I N C O May 13 '18 at 20:01
1

I'm a bit confused, because in the end it sounds like you want to simply resize your window to the object size while keeping a specific minimum size.

As such all you'd need is a simple call to std::max() to determine the bigger value of two inputs:

unsigned int width = std::max(min_width, object_width);
unsigned int height = std::max(min_height, object_height);

When using the new size it will basically resize the window to match your object unless the object is smaller than your minimum size.

You can use the same pattern to also add a maximum size using std::min() as an additional layer:

unsigned int width = std::min(max_width, std::max(min_width, object_width));
unsigned int height = std::min(max_height, std::max(min_height, object_height));

Edit: As bolov correctly suggested, this can be simplified even more for modern compilers using the new std::clamp:

unsigned int width = std::clamp(object_width, min_width, max_width);
unsigned int height = std::clamp(object_height, min_height, max_height);
| improve this answer | |
  • for the last bit I suggest clamp - either c++17 or if that's not available then an implementation with your formula will do – bolov May 13 '18 at 21:17
  • Yeah, true, although it's probably going to be the same inlined or constexpr result anyway. Adding it. – Mario May 13 '18 at 21:20
  • Interesting, I didn't think about std::max() and solves one of my issues, thanks. – P I N C O May 14 '18 at 12:51
  • Interesting, I didn't think about std::max() and solves one of my issues. I may have explained myself poorly: the window can only shrink to a minimum size, if the object is smaller than said size I just need to display it and set the window size to windowMinSize. – P I N C O May 14 '18 at 13:04
2

The right pattern to be using here is to limit the number of code paths that invoke the external method so that there is a single point of usage:

Your pseudo-code becomes something like this:

auto new_win_size = windowMinSize;
if (Object.getSize().x > window.getSize().x || Object.getSize().y > window.getSize.y){
    if(Object.getSize().x > windowMinSize.x){
        new_win_size.x = Object.getSize().x;
        new_win_size.y = window.getSize().y;
    }
    if(Object.getSize().y > windowMinSize.y){
        new_win_size.x = window.getSize().x;
        new_win_size.y = Object.getSize().y;
    }
}

window.resize(new_win_size );

But I suspect what you actually want is:

auto new_win_size = windowMinSize;

if(Object.getSize().x > windowMinSize.x){
    new_win_size.x = Object.getSize().x;
}
if(Object.getSize().y > windowMinSize.y){
    new_win_size.y = Object.getSize().y;
}

window.resize(new_win_size );
| improve this answer | |
  • This is mostly what I wanted and I'll probably end up using this. I guess there is no way to have something like multiple if statements sharing an else. – P I N C O May 13 '18 at 20:32
  • Your code won't work as expected if you have to resize the window in both dimensions. In that case you'll always keep the window's previous width (because the updated value is reset/overwritten). You'd have to store your window's size in new_win_size first and then continue with that alone rather than using window.getSize(). – Mario May 13 '18 at 21:07
1

You could play with variadic templates to get what you want. My version here takes an else function (the first argument), then pairs of functions (predicate, block, predicate, block, ...). If none of the predicates evaluate to true, the else function will be executed. This should work with C++11 or later.

There may be some bugs here (I haven't done much testing), but you can kick the tires. If you change the #if 0 to #if 1 you can observe that the else function won't be called.

#include <iostream>

template <typename PRED, typename EXEC>
bool multi_branch_detail(PRED pred, EXEC exec) {
    if(pred()) {
        exec();
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

template <typename PRED, typename EXEC, typename ...REM>
bool multi_branch_detail(PRED pred, EXEC exec, REM ...rem) {
    auto result = false;
    if(pred()) {
        exec();
        result = true;
    }
    return multi_branch_detail(std::forward<REM>(rem)...) || result;
}

template <typename ELSE, typename ...FNS>
void multi_branch(ELSE el, FNS ...fns) {
    if(!multi_branch_detail(std::forward<FNS>(fns)...)) {
        el();
    }
}


int main() {
    multi_branch(
        []() { std::cout << "No cases\n"; },

#if 0
        []() { return 1 < 2; }, []() { std::cout << "first case\n"; },
        []() { return 10 < 20; }, []() { std::cout << "second case\n"; },
#endif
        []() { return 1 > 2; }, []() { std::cout << "bug\n"; }
    );
    return 0;
}

Output with #if 0:

No cases

Output with #if 1:

first case
second case
| improve this answer | |
  • This is an interesting idea, but feels a bit overkill (and hard to read) to me. – Mario May 13 '18 at 21:13
  • @Mario - I agree this overkill for the example in the original question, but I was trying to solve the spirit of the question and cover the general case. This could definitely be cleaned up with some effort, and it may make sense to do stuff the predicate/exec functions into an std::pair, but I consider all that future improvements. – Stephen Newell May 13 '18 at 21:40
  • Very interesting approach, especially if you are looking into to the issue in a wider scope. However, as both of you just said, it's a little overkill for the simple task I'm trying to achieve. – P I N C O May 14 '18 at 12:56
1

I am interpreting your question as asking how to refactor the following code:

if ( A )
{
     if ( B ) { X } else { Y }
     if ( C ) { Z } else { Y }
}
else { Y }

to avoid repetition of Y.


One way would be:

bool A = ....;
bool B = ....;
bool C = ....;

if      ( A && B ) { X }
else if ( A && C ) { Z }
else { Y }

although this may involve unnecessary function calls compared to short circuiting behaviour of the original code.


The most "obvious" solution is storing a variable:

bool updated = false;
if ( A ) 
{
    if ( B ) { X; updated = true; }
    if ( C ) { Z; updated = true; }
}
if ( !updated ) { Y }

Another way would be to use a control structure you can break out of:

do
{
     if ( A )
     {
          if ( B ) { X; break; }
          if ( C ) { Z; break; }
     }
     Y;
} while (0);

Some people dislike this because if you are reading the code it looks like we are entering a loop, but it later turns out not to be a loop. Personally I would make a function (with break being replaced by return); but if using the do...while(0) you should put a code comment at the start to point out that this is not really a loop.

| improve this answer | |
  • I may have explained myself poorly, what I'm trying to refactor looks more like if (A || B) { if (A) {X} else Y; if (B) {Z} else Y} else Y – P I N C O May 14 '18 at 12:49
  • @Pinco you could still use the same patterns as in my answer – M.M May 14 '18 at 21:14

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