26

In Dart, what's the difference between List.from and List.of, and between Map.from and Map.of? Their documentation is not totally clear:

/**
* Creates a [LinkedHashMap] instance that contains all key/value pairs of
* [other].
*
* The keys must all be instances of [K] and the values of [V].
* The [other] map itself can have any type.
*
* A `LinkedHashMap` requires the keys to implement compatible
* `operator==` and `hashCode`, and it allows `null` as a key.
* It iterates in key insertion order.
*/
factory Map.from(Map other) = LinkedHashMap<K, V>.from;

/**
* Creates a [LinkedHashMap] with the same keys and values as [other].
*
* A `LinkedHashMap` requires the keys to implement compatible
* `operator==` and `hashCode`, and it allows `null` as a key.
* It iterates in key insertion order.
*/
factory Map.of(Map<K, V> other) = LinkedHashMap<K, V>.of;

/**
* Creates a list containing all [elements].
*
* The [Iterator] of [elements] provides the order of the elements.
*
* All the [elements] should be instances of [E].
* The `elements` iterable itself may have any element type, so this
* constructor can be used to down-cast a `List`, for example as:
* ```dart
* List<SuperType> superList = ...;
* List<SubType> subList =
*     new List<SubType>.from(superList.whereType<SubType>());
* ```
*
* This constructor creates a growable list when [growable] is true;
* otherwise, it returns a fixed-length list.
*/
external factory List.from(Iterable elements, {bool growable: true});

/**
* Creates a list from [elements].
*
* The [Iterator] of [elements] provides the order of the elements.
*
* This constructor creates a growable list when [growable] is true;
* otherwise, it returns a fixed-length list.
*/
factory List.of(Iterable<E> elements, {bool growable: true}) =>
  new List<E>.from(elements, growable: growable);

Is the difference related to generics? Maybe the .from factories let you change the type of the list, while the .of ones do not? I come from a Java background, which works with type erasure, and maybe types are reified in Dart and you cannot use casts or raw types to change list/map types?

29

The important difference between the from and of methods are that the latter have type annotations and the former do not. Since Dart generics are reified and Dart 2 is strongly typed, this is key to both ensuring the List/Map is correctly constructed:

List<String> foo = new List.from(<int>[1, 2, 3]); // okay until runtime.
List<String> bar = new List.of(<int>[1, 2, 3]); // analysis error

And ensuring that the types are inferred correctly:

var foo = new List.from(<int>[1, 2, 3]); // List<dynamic>
var bar = new List.of(<int>[1, 2, 3]); // List<int>

In Dart 1 types were completely optional, so many APIs were untyped or partially typed. List.from and Map.from are good examples, since the Iterable/Map passed into them doesn't have a type parameter. Sometimes Dart can figure out what the type of this object should be, but sometimes it just ended up as List<dynamic> or Map<dynamic, dynamic>.

In Dart 2 the type dynamic was changed from being both a top (Object) and bottom (null) type to only being a top type. Thus if you created a List<dynamic> accidentally in Dart 1 you could still pass it to a method which required a List<String>. But in Dart 2 List<dynamic> is almost the same as List<Object>, so this would fail.

If you are using Dart 2, you should always use the typed version of these APIs. Why do the old ones still exist, and what are the plans there? I don't really know. I would guess they would be phased out over time, along with the rest of the Dart 1.

5
  • Maybe List.from is useful if you want to discard type info? Like in the example given in the List.from documentation: List<SubType> subList = new List<SubType>.from(superList.whereType<SubType>());. That can't be done with List.of?
    – MarcG
    May 13 '18 at 21:52
  • Everything that you can do with List.from you can do with List.of though. In this example, List<subtype> sublist = new List.of(superList.whereType<subtype>()) May 13 '18 at 22:04
  • 8
    Then the method docs should be updated. It's not clear at all. Thanks.
    – MarcG
    May 13 '18 at 23:16
  • It's worth raising an issue on the dart sdk repo, but I also think the style guide will be updated fro 2.0. these constructors may only exist to make migration easier May 13 '18 at 23:55
  • Why isn't List.from marked as deprecated then?
    – Hari Honor
    Jul 22 at 8:46
0

Whenever possible it is better to use collection literals now rather than the .from or .of constructors. Apparently there are some performance benefits to this. (See link at bottom.)

Examples:

  • something.toList()
  • [...something]

Exception:

  • Can use .from if you need to downcast.

If you do use them, though, you should always include the type.

Source: Dart team engineer's post

3
  • To create a fixed length collection using List.of, you'd still need to pass growable: false as a parameter, so isn't it better to use toList(growable: false) than using List.of(..., growable: false)?
    – CopsOnRoad
    Aug 27 at 7:07
  • @CopsOnRoad I'm thinking that too but it wasn't clear to me from the linked post and comments. It seems like the .of isn't needed for anything now.
    – Suragch
    Aug 27 at 7:21
  • Yes, List.of() doesn't make any sense now after I read that linked post.
    – CopsOnRoad
    Aug 27 at 7:24

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