132

Is there any possible optimization for random access on a very big array (I currently use uint8_t, and I'm asking about what's better)

uint8_t MyArray[10000000];

when the value at any position in the array is

  • 0 or 1 for 95% of all cases,
  • 2 in 4% of cases,
  • between 3 and 255 in the other 1% of cases?

So, is there anything better than a uint8_t array to use for this? It should be as quick as possible to loop over the whole array in a random order, and this is very heavy on RAM bandwidth, so when having more than a few threads doing that at the same time for different arrays, currently the whole RAM bandwidth is quickly saturated.

I'm asking since it feels very inefficient to have such a big array (10 MB) when it's actually known that almost all values, apart from 5%, will be either 0 or 1. So when 95% of all values in the array would only actually need 1 bit instead of 8 bit, this would reduce memory usage by almost an order of magnitude. It feels like there has to be a more memory efficient solution that would greatly reduce RAM bandwidth required for this, and as a result also be significantly quicker for random access.

  • 36
    Two bits (0 / 1 / see hashtable) and a hashtable for the values bigger than 1? – user253751 May 14 '18 at 5:30
  • 6
    @user202729 On what does it depend? I think this is something that's an interesting question for anyone who has to do something similar like I do, so I would like to see more of a universal solution for this, not an answer that's super specific to my code. If it depends on something, it would be good to have an answer explaining what it depends on so that everyone reading it can understand if there is a better solution for his own case. – JohnAl May 14 '18 at 5:44
  • 7
    Essentially, what you're asking about is called sparsity. – Mateen Ulhaq May 14 '18 at 6:01
  • 5
    Needs more information... Why is the access random, and do the non-zero values follow a pattern? – Ext3h May 14 '18 at 6:51
  • 4
    @IwillnotexistIdonotexist A precomputation step would be fine, but the array should still be modified from time to time, so the precomputation step shouldn't be too expensive. – JohnAl May 15 '18 at 8:12

13 Answers 13

155

A simple possibility that comes to mind is to keep a compressed array of 2 bits per value for the common cases, and a separated 4 byte per value (24 bit for original element index, 8 bit for actual value, so (idx << 8) | value)) sorted array for the other ones.

When you look up a value, you first do a lookup in the 2bpp array (O(1)); if you find 0, 1 or 2 it's the value you want; if you find 3 it means that you have to look it up in the secondary array. Here you'll perform a binary search to look for the index of your interest left-shifted by 8 (O(log(n) with a small n, as this should be the 1%), and extract the value from the 4-byte thingie.

std::vector<uint8_t> main_arr;
std::vector<uint32_t> sec_arr;

uint8_t lookup(unsigned idx) {
    // extract the 2 bits of our interest from the main array
    uint8_t v = (main_arr[idx>>2]>>(2*(idx&3)))&3;
    // usual (likely) case: value between 0 and 2
    if(v != 3) return v;
    // bad case: lookup the index<<8 in the secondary array
    // lower_bound finds the first >=, so we don't need to mask out the value
    auto ptr = std::lower_bound(sec_arr.begin(), sec_arr.end(), idx<<8);
#ifdef _DEBUG
    // some coherency checks
    if(ptr == sec_arr.end()) std::abort();
    if((*ptr >> 8) != idx) std::abort();
#endif
    // extract our 8-bit value from the 32 bit (index, value) thingie
    return (*ptr) & 0xff;
}

void populate(uint8_t *source, size_t size) {
    main_arr.clear(); sec_arr.clear();
    // size the main storage (round up)
    main_arr.resize((size+3)/4);
    for(size_t idx = 0; idx < size; ++idx) {
        uint8_t in = source[idx];
        uint8_t &target = main_arr[idx>>2];
        // if the input doesn't fit, cap to 3 and put in secondary storage
        if(in >= 3) {
            // top 24 bits: index; low 8 bit: value
            sec_arr.push_back((idx << 8) | in);
            in = 3;
        }
        // store in the target according to the position
        target |= in << ((idx & 3)*2);
    }
}

For an array such as the one you proposed, this should take 10000000 / 4 = 2500000 bytes for the first array, plus 10000000 * 1% * 4 B = 400000 bytes for the second array; hence 2900000 bytes, i.e. less than one third of the original array, and the most used portion is all kept together in memory, which should be good for caching (it may even fit L3).

If you need more than 24-bit addressing, you'll have to tweak the "secondary storage"; a trivial way to extend it is to have a 256 element pointer array to switch over the top 8 bits of the index and forward to a 24-bit indexed sorted array as above.


Quick benchmark

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <chrono>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

using namespace std::chrono;

/// XorShift32 generator; extremely fast, 2^32-1 period, way better quality
/// than LCG but fail some test suites
struct XorShift32 {
    /// This stuff allows to use this class wherever a library function
    /// requires a UniformRandomBitGenerator (e.g. std::shuffle)
    typedef uint32_t result_type;
    static uint32_t min() { return 1; }
    static uint32_t max() { return uint32_t(-1); }

    /// PRNG state
    uint32_t y;

    /// Initializes with seed
    XorShift32(uint32_t seed = 0) : y(seed) {
        if(y == 0) y = 2463534242UL;
    }

    /// Returns a value in the range [1, 1<<32)
    uint32_t operator()() {
        y ^= (y<<13);
        y ^= (y>>17);
        y ^= (y<<15);
        return y;
    }

    /// Returns a value in the range [0, limit); this conforms to the RandomFunc
    /// requirements for std::random_shuffle
    uint32_t operator()(uint32_t limit) {
        return (*this)()%limit;
    }
};

struct mean_variance {
    double rmean = 0.;
    double rvariance = 0.;
    int count = 0;

    void operator()(double x) {
        ++count;
        double ormean = rmean;
        rmean     += (x-rmean)/count;
        rvariance += (x-ormean)*(x-rmean);
    }

    double mean()     const { return rmean; }
    double variance() const { return rvariance/(count-1); }
    double stddev()   const { return std::sqrt(variance()); }
};

std::vector<uint8_t> main_arr;
std::vector<uint32_t> sec_arr;

uint8_t lookup(unsigned idx) {
    // extract the 2 bits of our interest from the main array
    uint8_t v = (main_arr[idx>>2]>>(2*(idx&3)))&3;
    // usual (likely) case: value between 0 and 2
    if(v != 3) return v;
    // bad case: lookup the index<<8 in the secondary array
    // lower_bound finds the first >=, so we don't need to mask out the value
    auto ptr = std::lower_bound(sec_arr.begin(), sec_arr.end(), idx<<8);
#ifdef _DEBUG
    // some coherency checks
    if(ptr == sec_arr.end()) std::abort();
    if((*ptr >> 8) != idx) std::abort();
#endif
    // extract our 8-bit value from the 32 bit (index, value) thingie
    return (*ptr) & 0xff;
}

void populate(uint8_t *source, size_t size) {
    main_arr.clear(); sec_arr.clear();
    // size the main storage (round up)
    main_arr.resize((size+3)/4);
    for(size_t idx = 0; idx < size; ++idx) {
        uint8_t in = source[idx];
        uint8_t &target = main_arr[idx>>2];
        // if the input doesn't fit, cap to 3 and put in secondary storage
        if(in >= 3) {
            // top 24 bits: index; low 8 bit: value
            sec_arr.push_back((idx << 8) | in);
            in = 3;
        }
        // store in the target according to the position
        target |= in << ((idx & 3)*2);
    }
}

volatile unsigned out;

int main() {
    XorShift32 xs;
    std::vector<uint8_t> vec;
    int size = 10000000;
    for(int i = 0; i<size; ++i) {
        uint32_t v = xs();
        if(v < 1825361101)      v = 0; // 42.5%
        else if(v < 4080218931) v = 1; // 95.0%
        else if(v < 4252017623) v = 2; // 99.0%
        else {
            while((v & 0xff) < 3) v = xs();
        }
        vec.push_back(v);
    }
    populate(vec.data(), vec.size());
    mean_variance lk_t, arr_t;
    for(int i = 0; i<50; ++i) {
        {
            unsigned o = 0;
            auto beg = high_resolution_clock::now();
            for(int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
                o += lookup(xs() % size);
            }
            out += o;
            int dur = (high_resolution_clock::now()-beg)/microseconds(1);
            fprintf(stderr, "lookup: %10d µs\n", dur);
            lk_t(dur);
        }
        {
            unsigned o = 0;
            auto beg = high_resolution_clock::now();
            for(int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
                o += vec[xs() % size];
            }
            out += o;
            int dur = (high_resolution_clock::now()-beg)/microseconds(1);
            fprintf(stderr, "array:  %10d µs\n", dur);
            arr_t(dur);
        }
    }

    fprintf(stderr, " lookup |   ±  |  array  |   ±  | speedup\n");
    printf("%7.0f | %4.0f | %7.0f | %4.0f | %0.2f\n",
            lk_t.mean(), lk_t.stddev(),
            arr_t.mean(), arr_t.stddev(),
            arr_t.mean()/lk_t.mean());
    return 0;
}

(code and data always updated in my Bitbucket)

The code above populates a 10M element array with random data distributed as OP specified in their post, initializes my data structure and then:

  • performs a random lookup of 10M elements with my data structure
  • does the same through the original array.

(notice that in case of sequential lookup the array always wins by a huge measure, as it's the most cache-friendly lookup you can do)

These last two blocks are repeated 50 times and timed; at the end, the mean and standard deviation for each type of lookup are calculated and printed, along with the speedup (lookup_mean/array_mean).

I compiled the code above with g++ 5.4.0 (-O3 -static, plus some warnings) on Ubuntu 16.04, and ran it on some machines; most of them are running Ubuntu 16.04, some some older Linux, some some newer Linux. I don't think the OS should be relevant at all in this case.

            CPU           |  cache   |  lookup (µs)   |     array (µs)  | speedup (x)
Xeon E5-1650 v3 @ 3.50GHz | 15360 KB |  60011 ±  3667 |   29313 ±  2137 | 0.49
Xeon E5-2697 v3 @ 2.60GHz | 35840 KB |  66571 ±  7477 |   33197 ±  3619 | 0.50
Celeron G1610T  @ 2.30GHz |  2048 KB | 172090 ±   629 |  162328 ±   326 | 0.94
Core i3-3220T   @ 2.80GHz |  3072 KB | 111025 ±  5507 |  114415 ±  2528 | 1.03
Core i5-7200U   @ 2.50GHz |  3072 KB |  92447 ±  1494 |   95249 ±  1134 | 1.03
Xeon X3430      @ 2.40GHz |  8192 KB | 111303 ±   936 |  127647 ±  1503 | 1.15
Core i7 920     @ 2.67GHz |  8192 KB | 123161 ± 35113 |  156068 ± 45355 | 1.27
Xeon X5650      @ 2.67GHz | 12288 KB | 106015 ±  5364 |  140335 ±  6739 | 1.32
Core i7 870     @ 2.93GHz |  8192 KB |  77986 ±   429 |  106040 ±  1043 | 1.36
Core i7-6700    @ 3.40GHz |  8192 KB |  47854 ±   573 |   66893 ±  1367 | 1.40
Core i3-4150    @ 3.50GHz |  3072 KB |  76162 ±   983 |  113265 ±   239 | 1.49
Xeon X5650      @ 2.67GHz | 12288 KB | 101384 ±   796 |  152720 ±  2440 | 1.51
Core i7-3770T   @ 2.50GHz |  8192 KB |  69551 ±  1961 |  128929 ±  2631 | 1.85

The results are... mixed!

  1. In general, on most of these machines there is some kind of speedup, or at least they are on a par.
  2. The two cases where the array truly trumps the "smart structure" lookup are on a machines with lots of cache and not particularly busy: the Xeon E5-1650 above (15 MB cache) is a night build machine, at the moment quite idle; the Xeon E5-2697 (35 MB cache) is a machine for high performance calculations, in an idle moment as well. It does make sense, the original array fits completely in their huge cache, so the compact data structure only adds complexity.
  3. At the opposite side of the "performance spectrum" - but where again the array is slightly faster, there's the humble Celeron that powers my NAS; it has so little cache that neither the array nor the "smart structure" fits in it at all. Other machines with cache small enough perform similarly.
  4. The Xeon X5650 must be taken with some caution - they are virtual machines on a quite busy dual-socket virtual machine server; it may well be that, although nominally it has a decent amount of cache, during the time of the test it gets preempted by completely unrelated virtual machines several times.
  • 7
    @JohnAl You don't need a struct. A uint32_t will be fine. Erasing an element from the secondary buffer will obviously leave it sorted. Inserting an element can be done with std::lower_bound and then insert (rather than appending and re-sorting the whole thing). Updates make the full-size secondary array much more attractive - I'd certainly start with that. – Martin Bonner supports Monica May 14 '18 at 9:51
  • 6
    @JohnAl Because the value is (idx << 8) + val you don't have to worry about the value portion - just use a straight compare. It will always compare less than ((idx+1) << 8) + val and less than ((idx-1) << 8) + val – Martin Bonner supports Monica May 14 '18 at 9:57
  • 3
    @JohnAl: if that may be useful, I added a populate function that should populate main_arr and sec_arr according to the format that lookup expects. I didn't actually try it, so don't expect it to really work correctly :-) ; anyhow, it should give you the general idea. – Matteo Italia May 14 '18 at 10:44
  • 6
    I'm giving this +1 just for the benchmarking. Nice to see on a question about efficiency and with results for multiple processor types too! Nice! – Jack Aidley May 14 '18 at 14:02
  • 2
    @JohnAI You should profile it for your actual use case and nothing else. White room speed doesn't matter. – Jack Aidley May 14 '18 at 15:12
33

Another option could be

  • check if the result is 0, 1 or 2
  • if not do a regular lookup

In other words something like:

unsigned char lookup(int index) {
    int code = (bmap[index>>2]>>(2*(index&3)))&3;
    if (code != 3) return code;
    return full_array[index];
}

where bmap uses 2 bits per element with the value 3 meaning "other".

This structure is trivial to update, uses 25% more memory but the big part is looked up only in 5% of the cases. Of course, as usual, if it's a good idea or not depends on a lot of other conditions so the only answer is experimenting with real usage.

  • 4
    I'd say that's a good compromise to get as many cache hits as possible (since the reduced structure can fit in the cache more easily), without losing much on random access time. – meneldal May 14 '18 at 7:18
  • I think this can be further improved. I have had success in the past with a similar but different problem where exploiting branch predicition helped a lot. It may help to split the if(code != 3) return code; into if(code == 0) return 0; if(code==1) return 1; if(code == 2) return 2; – kutschkem May 16 '18 at 12:51
  • @kutschkem: in that case, __builtin_expect & co or PGO can also help. – Matteo Italia May 19 '18 at 21:00
23

This is more of a "long comment" than a concrete answer

Unless your data is something that is something well-known, I doubt anyone can DIRECTLY answer your question (and I'm not aware of anything that matches your description, but then I don't know EVERYTHING about all kinds of data patterns for all kinds of use-cases). Sparse data is a common problem in high performance computing, but it's typically "we have a very large array, but only some values are non-zero".

For not well known patterns like what I think yours is, nobody will KNOW directly which is better, and it depends on the details: how random is the random access - is the system accessing clusters of data items, or is it completely random like from a uniform random number generator. Is the table data completely random, or are there sequences of 0 then sequences of 1, with a scattering of other values? Run length encoding would work well if you have reasonably long sequences of 0 and 1, but won't work if you have "checkerboard of 0/1". Also, you'd have to keep a table of "starting points", so you can work your way to the relevant place reasonably quickly.

I know from a long time back that some big databases are just a large table in RAM (telephone exchange subscriber data in this example), and one of the problems there is that caches and page-table optimisations in the processor is pretty useless. The caller is so rarely the same as one recently calling someone, that there is no pre-loaded data of any kind, it's just purely random. Big page-tables is the best optimisation for that type of access.

In a lot of cases, compromising between "speed and small size" is one of those things you have to pick between in software engineering [in other engineering it's not necessarily so much of a compromise]. So, "wasting memory for simpler code" is quite often the preferred choice. In this sense, the "simple" solution is quite likely better for speed, but if you have "better" use for the RAM, then optimising for size of the table would give you sufficient performance and a good improvement on size. There are lots of different ways you could achieve this - as suggested in a comment, a 2 bit field where the two or three most common values are stored, and then some alternative data format for the other values - a hash-table would be my first approach, but a list or binary tree may work too - again, it depends on the patterns of where your "not 0, 1 or 2" are. Again, it depends on how the values are "scattered" in the table - are they in clusters or are they more of an evenly distributed pattern?

But a problem with that is that you are still reading the data from RAM. You are then spending more code processing the data, including some code to cope with the "this is not a common value".

The problem with most common compression algorithms is that they are based on unpacking sequences, so you can't random access them. And the overhead of splitting your big data into chunks of, say, 256 entries at a time, and uncompressing the 256 into a uint8_t array, fetching the data you want, and then throwing away your uncompressed data, is highly unlikely to give you good performance - assuming that's of some importance, of course.

In the end, you will probably have to implement one or a few of the ideas in comments/answers to test out, see if it helps solving your problem, or if memory bus is still the main limiting factor.

  • Thanks! In the end, I'm just interested in whats quicker when 100% of the CPU is busy with looping over such arrays (different threads over different arrays). Currently, with a uint8_t array, the RAM bandwidth is saturated after ~5 threads are working on that at the same time (on a quad channel system), so using more than 5 threads no longer gives any benefit. I would like this to use >10 threads without running into RAM bandwidth issues, but if the CPU side of the access becomes so slow that 10 threads get less done than 5 threads before, that would obviously not be progress. – JohnAl May 14 '18 at 7:00
  • @JohnAl How many cores do you have? If you are CPU bound, there's no point having more threads than cores. Also, maybe time to look at GPU programming? – Martin Bonner supports Monica May 14 '18 at 9:54
  • @MartinBonner I do currently have 12 threads. And I agree, this would probably run very nicely on a GPU. – JohnAl May 14 '18 at 10:07
  • 2
    @JohnAI: If you are simply running multiple versions of the same inefficient process on multiple threads, you will always see limited progress. There will be bigger wins in designing your algorithm for parallel processing than in tweaking a storage structure. – Jack Aidley May 14 '18 at 10:48
13

What I've done in the past is use a hashmap in front of a bitset.

This halves the space compared to Matteo's answer, but may be slower if "exception" lookups are slow (i.e. there are many exceptions).

Often, however, "cache is king".

  • 2
    How exactly would a hashmap halve the space compared to Matteo's answer? What should be in that hashmap? – JohnAl May 14 '18 at 7:04
  • 1
    @JohnAl Using a 1-bit bitset=bitvec instead of a 2-bit bitvec. – o11c May 14 '18 at 8:50
  • 2
    @o11c I'm not sure if I understand it correctly. You mean to have an array of 1 bit values where 0 means look at main_arr and 1 means look at the sec_arr (in the case of Matteos code)? That would need overall more space than Matteos answer though, since its one additional array. I don't quite understand how you would do it only using half the space compared to Matteos answer. – JohnAl May 14 '18 at 8:56
  • 1
    Could you clarify this? You look up the expectional cases first, and then look in the bitmap? If so, I suspect the slow lookup in the hash will overwhelm the savings in reducing the size of the bitmap. – Martin Bonner supports Monica May 14 '18 at 10:23
  • I thought this was called hashlinking - but google turns up no relevant hits so it must be something else. The way it usually worked was to have say a byte array that would hold values the vast majority of which were, say, between 0..254. Then you'd use 255 as a flag, and if you had a 255 element you'd look up the true value in an associated hash table. Can someone remember what it was called? (I think I read about it in an old IBM TR.) Anyway, you could also arrange it the way @o11c suggests - always lookup in the hash first, if it is not there, look in your bit array. – davidbak May 14 '18 at 22:21
11

Unless there is pattern to your data it is unlikely that there is any sensible speed or size optimisation, and - assuming you are targetting a normal computer - 10 MB isn't that big a deal anyway.

There are two assumptions in your questions:

  1. The data is being poorly stored because you aren't using all the bits
  2. Storing it better would make things faster.

I think both of these assumptions are false. In most cases the appropriate way to store data is to store the most natural representation. In your case, this is the one you've gone for: a byte for a number between 0 and 255. Any other representation will be more complex and therefore - all other things being equal - slower and more error prone. To need to divert from this general principle you need a stronger reason than potentially six "wasted" bits on 95% of your data.

For your second assumption, it will be true if, and only if, changing the size of the array results in substantially fewer cache misses. Whether this will happen can only be definitively determined by profiling working code, but I think it's highly unlikely to make a substantial difference. Because you will be randomly accessing the array in either case, the processor will struggle to know which bits of data to cache and keep in either case.

8

If the data and accesses are uniformly randomly distributed, performance is probably going to depend upon what fraction of accesses avoid an outer-level cache miss. Optimizing that will require knowing what size array can be reliably accommodated in cache. If your cache is large enough to accommodate one byte for every five cells, the simplest approach may be to have one byte hold the five base-three encoded values in the range 0-2 (there are 243 combinations of 5 values, so that will fit in a byte), along with a 10,000,000 byte array that would be queried whenever an the base-3 value indicates "2".

If the cache isn't that big, but could accommodate one byte per 8 cells, then it would not be possible to use one byte value to select from among all 6,561 possible combinations of eight base-3 values, but since the only effect of changing a 0 or 1 to a 2 would be to cause an otherwise-unnecessary lookup, correctness wouldn't require supporting all 6,561. Instead, one could focus on the 256 most "useful" values.

Especially if 0 is more common than 1, or vice versa, a good approach might be to use 217 values to encode the combinations of 0 and 1 that contain 5 or fewer 1's, 16 values to encode xxxx0000 through xxxx1111, 16 to encode 0000xxxx through 1111xxxx, and one for xxxxxxxx. Four values would remain for whatever other use one might find. If the data are randomly distributed as described, a slight majority of all queries would hit bytes which contained just zeroes and ones (in about 2/3 of all groups of eight, all bits would be zeroes and ones, and about 7/8 of those would have six or fewer 1 bits); the vast majority of those that didn't would land in a byte which contained four x's, and would have a 50% chance of landing on a zero or a one. Thus, only about one in four queries would necessitate a large-array lookup.

If the data are randomly distributed but the cache isn't big enough to handle one byte per eight elements, one could try to use this approach with each byte handling more than eight items, but unless there is a strong bias toward 0 or toward 1, the fraction of values that can be handled without having to do a lookup in the big array will shrink as the number handled by each byte increases.

7

I'll add to @o11c's answer, as his wording might be a bit confusing. If I need to squeeze the last bit and CPU cycle I'd do the following.

We will start by constructing a balanced binary search tree that holds the 5% "something else" cases. For every lookup, you walk the tree quickly: you have 10000000 elements: 5% of which is in the tree: hence the tree data structure holds 500000 elements. Walking this in O(log(n)) time, gives you 19 iterations. I'm no expert at this, but I guess there are some memory-efficient implementations out there. Let's guesstimate:

  • Balanced tree, so subtree position can be calculated (indices do not need to be stored in the nodes of the tree). The same way a heap (data structure) is stored in linear memory.
  • 1 byte value (2 to 255)
  • 3 bytes for the index (10000000 takes 23 bits, which fits 3 bytes)

Totalling, 4 bytes: 500000*4 = 1953 kB. Fits the cache!

For all the other cases (0 or 1), you can use a bitvector. Note that you cannot leave out the 5% other cases for random access: 1.19 MB.

The combination of these two use approximately 3,099 MB. Using this technique, you will save a factor 3.08 of memory.

However, this doesn't beat the answer of @Matteo Italia (which uses 2.76 MB), a pity. Is there anything we can do extra? The most memory consuming part is the 3 bytes of index in the tree. If we can get this down to 2, we would save 488 kB and the total memory usage would be: 2.622 MB, which is smaller!

How do we do this? We have to reduce the indexing to 2 bytes. Again, 10000000 takes 23 bits. We need to be able to drop 7 bits. We can simply do this by partitioning the range of 10000000 elements into 2^7 (=128) regions of 78125 elements. Now we can build a balanced tree for each of these regions, with 3906 elements on average. Picking the right tree is done by a simple division of the target index by 2^7 (or a bitshift >> 7). Now the required index to store can be represented by the remaining 16 bits. Note that there is some overhead for the length of the tree that needs to be stored, but this is negligible. Also note that this splitting mechanism reduces the required number of iterations to walk the tree, this now reduces to 7 iterations less, because we dropped 7 bits: only 12 iterations are left.

Note that you could theoretically repeat the process to cut off the next 8 bits, but this would require you to create 2^15 balanced trees, with ~305 elements on average. This would result in 2.143 MB, with only 4 iterations to walk the tree, which is a considerable speedup, compared to the 19 iterations we started with.

As a final conclusion: this beats the 2-bit vector strategy by a tiny bit of memory usage, but is a whole struggle to implement. But if it can make the difference between fitting the cache or not, it might be worth the try.

  • 1
    Valiant effort! – davidbak May 15 '18 at 19:50
  • 1
    Try this: Since 4% of the cases are the value 2 ... create a set of exceptional cases (>1). Create a tree somewhat as described for really exceptional cases (>2). If present in set and tree then use value in tree; if present in set and not tree then use value 2, otherwise (not present in set) lookup in your bitvector. Tree will contain only 100000 elements (bytes). Set contains 500000 elements (but no values at all). Does this reduce size while justifying its increased cost? (100% of lookups look in set; 5% of lookups need to look in tree also.) – davidbak May 15 '18 at 19:54
  • You always want to use a CFBS-sorted array when you have an immutable tree, so there is no allocation for the nodes, just the data. – o11c Jun 1 '18 at 1:29
5

If you only perform read operations it would be better to not assign a value to an single index but to an interval of indices.

For example:

[0, 15000] = 0
[15001, 15002] = 153
[15003, 26876] = 2
[25677, 31578] = 0
...

This can be done with a struct. You also might want to define a class similar to this if you like an OO approach.

class Interval{
  private:
    uint32_t start; // First element of interval
    uint32_t end; // Last element of interval
    uint8_t value; // Assigned value

  public:
    Interval(uint32_t start, uint32_t end, uint8_t value);
    bool isInInterval(uint32_t item); // Checks if item lies within interval
    uint8_t getValue(); // Returns the assigned value
}

Now you just have to iterate trough a list of intervals and check if your index lies within one of them which can be much less memory intensive in average but costs more CPU resources.

Interval intervals[INTERVAL_COUNT];
intervals[0] = Interval(0, 15000, 0);
intervals[1] = Interval(15001, 15002, 153);
intervals[2] = Interval(15003, 26876, 2);
intervals[3] = Interval(25677, 31578, 0);
...

uint8_t checkIntervals(uint32_t item)

    for(int i=0; i<INTERVAL_COUNT-1; i++)
    {
        if(intervals[i].isInInterval(item) == true)
        {
            return intervals[i].getValue();
        }
    }
    return DEFAULT_VALUE;
}

If you order the intervals by descending size you increase the probability that the item you are looking for is found early which further decreases your average memory and CPU resource usage.

You could also remove all intervals with a size of 1. Put the corresponding values into a map and check them only if the item you are looking for wasn't found in the intervals. This should also raise the average performance a bit.

  • 4
    Interesting idea (+1) but I am somewhat skeptical that it would justify the overhead unless there are a lot of long runs of 0's and/or long runs of 1's. In effect you are suggesting using a run-length encoding of the data. It might be good in some situations but probably isn't a good general approach to this problem. – John Coleman May 15 '18 at 12:06
  • Right. In particular for random access, this is almost certainly slower than a simple array or unt8_t, even if it takes much less memory. – leftaroundabout May 16 '18 at 14:02
4

Long long time ago, I can just remember...

In university we got a task to accelerate a ray tracer program, that has to read by algorithm over and over again from buffer arrays. A friend told me to always use RAM-reads that are multiples of 4Bytes. So I changed the array from a pattern of [x1,y1,z1,x2,y2,z2,...,xn,yn,zn] to a pattern of [x1,y1,z1,0,x2,y2,z2,0,...,xn,yn,zn,0]. Means I add a empty field after each 3D coordinate. After some performance testing: It was faster. So long story short: Read multiple of 4 Bytes from your array from RAM, and maybe also from the right starting position, so you read a little cluster where the searched index is in it and read the searched index from this little cluster in cpu. (In your case you will not need to inserting fill-fields, but the concept should be clear)

Maybe also other multiples could be the key in newer systems.

I don't know if this will work in your case, so if it doesn't work: Sorry. If it work I would be happy to hear about some test results.

PS: Oh and if there is any access pattern or nearby accessed indices, you can reuse the cached cluster.

PPS: It could be, that the multiple factor was more like 16Bytes or something like that, it's too long ago, that I can remember exactly.

  • You are probably thinking about cachelines, which are usually 32 or 64 bytes, but that wont help much here as the access is random. – Surt May 20 '18 at 21:24
3

Looking at this, you could split your data, for example:

  • a bitset which gets indexed and represents the value 0 (std::vector would be useful here)
  • a bitset which gets indexed and represents the value 1
  • a std::vector for the values of 2, containing the indexes which refer to this value
  • a map for the other values (or std::vector>)

In this case, all values appear till a given index, so you could even remove one of bitsets and represents the value as it being missing in the other ones.

This will save you some memory for this case, though would make the worst case worse. You'll also need more CPU power to do the lookups.

Make sure to measure!

  • 1
    A bitset for ones/zeros. A set of indices for twos. And a sparse associative array for the rest. – Red.Wave May 15 '18 at 7:04
  • That's the short summary – JVApen May 15 '18 at 10:46
  • Let the OP know the terms, so he can search for alternate implementations of each. – Red.Wave May 15 '18 at 12:00
2

Like Mats mentions in his comment-answer, it is hard to say what is actually the best solution without knowing specifically what kind of data you have (e.g., are there long runs of 0's, and so on), and what your access pattern looks like (does "random" mean "all over the place" or just "not strictly in completely linear fashion" or "every value exactly once, just randomized" or ...).

That said, there are two mechanisms coming to mind:

  • Bit arrays; i.e., if you only had two values, you could trivially compress your array by a factor of 8; if you have 4 values (or "3 values + everything else") you can compress by a factor of two. Which might just not be worth the trouble and would need benchmarks, especially if you have really random access patterns which escape your caches and hence do not change the access time at all.
  • (index,value) or (value,index) tables. I.e., have one very small table for the 1% case, maybe one table for the 5% case (which only needs to store the indexes as all have the same value), and a big compressed bit array for the final two cases. And with "table" I mean something which allows relatively quick lookup; i.e., maybe a hash, a binary tree, and so on, depending on what you have available and your actual needs. If these subtables fit into your 1st/2nd level caches, you might get lucky.
1

I am not very familiar with C, but in C++ you can use unsigned char to represent an integer in the range 0 - 255.

Compared to normal int (again, I am coming from Java and C++ world) in which 4 byte (32 bit) are required, an unsigned char requires 1 byte (8 bits). so it might reduce the total size of the array by 75%.

  • That is probably already the case with the use of uint8_t - the 8 means 8 bits. – Peter Mortensen May 21 '18 at 20:36
-4

You have succinctly described all the distribution characteristics of your array; toss the array.

You can easily replace the array with a randomized method that produces the same probabilistic output as the array.

If consistency matters (producing the same value for the same random index), consider using a bloom filter and/or hash map to track repeat hits. If your array accesses really are random, though, this is totally unnecessary.

  • 18
    I suspect "random access" was being used here to indicate that accesses are unpredictable, not that they are actually random. (i.e. it's intended in the sense of "random access files") – Michael Kay May 14 '18 at 17:16
  • Yes, that is likely. OP isn't clear, however. If OP's accesses are in any way not random, then some form of sparse array is indicated, as per the other answers. – Dúthomhas May 14 '18 at 18:08
  • 1
    I think you have a point there, since the OP indicated he would loop over the entire array in a random order. For the case that only distributions need to be observed, this is a good answer. – Ingo Schalk-Schupp May 15 '18 at 21:11

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