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I have an std::unordered_map<std::tuple<A, A>, B> map;. I have a function that modifies such map

void modify(const A& a1, const A& a2)
{
    map[/* a1, a2 */].modify();
}

Now I am a bit concerned about unnecessary copies of A's. Here are my attempts.

map[{a1, a2}].modify();

It looks clean, but it constructs temporary key (tuple) from copies of a1, a2.

map[std::tie(a1, a2)].modify();

This looks promising, because it constructs std::tuple<const A&, const A&> and passes that to map's operator[]. Signature of operator[] for my map is

B& operator[](const std::tuple<A, A>&)
B& operator[](std::tuple<A, A>&&)

Which doesn't match return type of std::tie, but it worked. So I look at a constructors of std::tuple and found converting constructors, which made me think, that copies are still made (so I tested it).

Is there a way to query the map, without any unnecessary copies, and still preserve O(1) average lookup complexity?

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  • 1
    C++11 is a must? May 14, 2018 at 8:46
  • @StoryTeller I want to get this working in C++11, but I might be interested in other solutions as well.
    – Zereges
    May 14, 2018 at 8:55
  • 1
    @FrancisCugler The signature of modify is set. I can't use neighter move nor perfect forwarding, since I have references.
    – Zereges
    May 14, 2018 at 9:42
  • 1
    @Clonk That is what I was thinking. If a1 & a2 will always be of the same type; instead of using tuple use a single class template. template<typename T> struct Pair { T t1, T t2 ... constructors etc. }; Use that instead of tuple and this way you might be able to use move semantics instead, but the OP did state that the modify function is set... May 14, 2018 at 10:03
  • 1
    @FrancisCugler Maybe there is, see my updated answer. May 14, 2018 at 11:55

2 Answers 2

5

My best guess is that you cannot avoid copying here. The whole problem boils down to something like this:

A x1;
std::tuple<A&> t1{x1};
const std::tuple<A>& t2{t1};
const std::tuple<A>& t3{std::tuple<A&>{x1}};

Both constructions of t2 and t3 invokes a copy constructor of A (live demo: https://wandbox.org/permlink/MxTUb61kO3zL3HmD).

If you really care about performance and instances of A are expensive to copy, you can place them into some pool (e.g., std::vector<A>) and then put into your map only pointers to them (std::unordered_map<std::tuple<A*,A*>,B>).


UPDATE

Note that you can also design your own "tuple/pair" class that can be constructed either by values or by references. A very basic solution could look like:

struct construct_from_ref_tag { };

template <typename T> class ref_pair {
  public:
    ref_pair(T v1, T v2)
      : v1_(std::move(v1)), v2_(std::move(v2)), r1_(v1_), r2_(v2_) { }
    ref_pair(const T& r1, const T& r2, construct_from_ref_tag)
      : r1_(r1), r2_(r2) { }
    bool operator==(const ref_pair<T>& rhs) const {
      return ((r1_ == rhs.r1_) && (r2_ == rhs.r2_)); }
    size_t hash() const {
      return std::hash<T>{}(r1_) ^ std::hash<T>{}(r2_); }
  private:
    T v1_, v2_;
    const T& r1_;
    const T& r2_; 
};

namespace std {
  template <typename T> struct hash<ref_pair<T>> {
    size_t operator()(const ref_pair<T>& v) const { return v.hash(); }
  };
}

Its usage does not trigger any copy/move constructor during elements access in map:

std::unordered_map<ref_pair<A>, int> map;
map[ref_pair<A>(1, 2)] = 3;

A a1{1};
A a2{2};

std::cout << "before access" << std::endl;
map[ref_pair<A>(a1, a2, construct_from_ref_tag{})] += 1;

I don't like it much but it works. T must be default-constructible here and default constructor is supposed to be cheap. A live demo: https://wandbox.org/permlink/obSfPEJXn3Yr5oRw.

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  • That's what I've came up with too, but was hoping I overlooked something.
    – Zereges
    May 14, 2018 at 9:45
  • @Zereges By the way, I would definitely profile to prove that the copying matters here at runtime first. Compilers are powerful and, unless copying involves e.g. dynamic memory allocations, it might be optimized away. We don't know the details since you didn't specify what A looks like. May 14, 2018 at 9:49
  • But that was not point of the question. I merely asked whether it is possible to avoid the copy, from language point of view. What compiler does under the hood was not part of the question. That's why it didn't depend on what A actually is.
    – Zereges
    May 14, 2018 at 10:54
  • @Zereges I see, it was just a comment, maybe for another readers in the future. May 14, 2018 at 11:05
  • @Zereges I just updated my answer by another solution. You might be interested... May 14, 2018 at 11:54
0

I don't think you can avoid the copy. Instead of using tuples I written a basic template pair class and just substituted it in to your code from your site using move semantics, and this is what I've come up with:

template<typename T>
struct Pair {
    T t1;
    T t2;

    Pair<T>() : t1(), t2() {}
    Pair<T>( T a, T b ) : t1( std::move(a) ), t2( std::move(b) ) {}

    Pair<T>( const Pair<T>& p ) : t1( std::move( p.t1 ) ), t2( std::move( p.t2 ) ) {}
    Pair<T>( Pair<T>&& p ) : t1( std::move( p.t1 ) ), t2( std::move( p.t2 ) ) {}

    Pair<T>& operator=( const Pair<T>& p ) {
        t1 = std::move( p.t1 );
        t2 = std::move( p.t2 );
        return *this;
    }

    Pair<T>& operator=( Pair<T>&& p ) {
        t1 = std::move( p.t1 );
        t2 = std::move( p.t2 );
        return *this;
    }
};

struct verbose {
    explicit verbose( int val ) : val( val ) { std::cout << " default ctor\n"; }
    ~verbose() { std::cout << val << " dtor\n"; }

    verbose( const verbose& v ) : val( v.val ) { std::cout << val << " copy ctor\n"; }
    verbose( verbose&& v ) : val( v.val ) { std::cout << val << " move ctor\n"; }

    verbose& operator=( const verbose& v ) {
        val = v.val;
        std::cout << val << " copy assign\n";
        return *this;
    }
    verbose& operator=( verbose&& v ) {
        val = v.val;
        std::cout << val << " move assign " << std::endl;
        return *this;
    }

    int val;
};

struct verbose_hash {
    std::size_t operator()( const Pair<verbose>& v ) const {
        return std::hash<int>{}(std::move( v.t1 ).val ^ std::move( v.t2 ).val);
    }
};

struct verbose_eq {
    bool operator()( const Pair<verbose>& lhs, const Pair<verbose>& rhs ) const {
        return (std::move( lhs ).t1).val == (std::move( rhs ).t1).val &&
            (std::move( lhs ).t2).val == (std::move( rhs ).t2).val;
    }
};

std::unordered_map<Pair<verbose>, int, verbose_hash, verbose_eq> map;

void modify1( const verbose& v1, const verbose& v2 ) {
    map[{v1, v2}] = 1;
}

void modify2( const verbose& v1, const verbose& v2 ) {
    //map[std::tie(v1, v2)] = 1;  // won't work not using tuple
}

int main() { 

    map.emplace(  std::move( Pair<verbose>( verbose(1) , verbose(2) ) ), std::move( 0 ) );
    std::cout << "After emplace\n";

    verbose v1( 1 ), v2( 2 );
    std::cout << "Before lookup1\n";
    modify1( std::move(v1), std::move(v2) );
    std::cout << "Before dtors\n";

    std::cout << "\nPress any key and enter to quit.\n";
    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}

Output:

 default ctor
1 move ctor
2 move ctor
1 dtor
2 dtor
1 move ctor
2 move ctor
2 dtor
1 dtor
After emplace
 default ctor
 default ctor
Before lookup1
2 copy ctor        // copy
1 copy ctor        // copy
1 move ctor
2 move ctor
1 dtor
2 dtor
2 dtor
1 dtor
Before dtors

The code is using the move semantics but because the function is bound to an lvalue by const reference; you are not going to get away from the copies.

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