145

What will be printed out? 6 6 or 6 7? And why?

void foo()
{
    static int x = 5;
    x++;
    printf("%d", x);
}

int main()
{
    foo();
    foo();
    return 0;
}
10
  • 62
    What's the problem to try?
    – Andrew
    Feb 17, 2011 at 19:32
  • 18
    Did you try to type this in and see for yourself? Feb 17, 2011 at 19:32
  • 25
    I want to understand why.
    – Vadiklk
    Feb 17, 2011 at 19:33
  • 12
    @Vadiklk so ask question starting with "Why"
    – Andrey
    Feb 17, 2011 at 19:33
  • 2
    ideone.com/t9Bbe What would you expect? Does the result not match your expection? Why did you expect your result?
    – eckes
    Feb 17, 2011 at 19:34

13 Answers 13

232

There are two issues here, lifetime and scope.

The scope of variable is where the variable name can be seen. Here, x is visible only inside function foo().

The lifetime of a variable is the period over which it exists. If x were defined without the keyword static, the lifetime would be from the entry into foo() to the return from foo(); so it would be re-initialized to 5 on every call.

The keyword static acts to extend the lifetime of a variable to the lifetime of the programme; e.g. initialization occurs once and once only and then the variable retains its value - whatever it has come to be - over all future calls to foo().

5
  • in what scenarios we need to declare a variable as static inside a function?, just curious to know as I haven't used this before?
    – Akay
    Aug 1, 2018 at 11:54
  • i'd say thanks, but this was all answered at the very tip top of the page. it makes me laugh that people don't just run their own code. xD
    – Puddle
    Dec 22, 2018 at 21:58
  • This answer is wrong. The moment you think about recursive functions the definitions as described here do not explain the behavior! Feb 3, 2019 at 18:17
  • 1
    What happens if I declare a static variable and then initialize on a separate line like so: static int a; a = 0; In this case, a would be reset to 0 each time. Is that correct? Mar 31, 2020 at 6:03
  • 2
    @LakshyaGoyal Your second line is a statement, not an initialization. So yes, you are correct that a would be zero (immediately after the 2nd line is ran) each time. This would, of course, likely negate the benefits of using a static variable. Dec 18, 2020 at 19:36
75

Output: 6 7

Reason: static variable is initialised only once (unlike auto variable) and further definition of static variable would be bypassed during runtime. And if it is not initialised manually, it is initialised by value 0 automatically. So,

void foo() {
    static int x = 5; // assigns value of 5 only once
    x++;
    printf("%d", x);
}

int main() {
    foo(); // x = 6
    foo(); // x = 7
    return 0;
}
0
12

That is the same as having the following program:

static int x = 5;

void foo()
{
    x++;
    printf("%d", x);
}

int main()
{
     foo();
     foo();
     return 0;
}

All that the static keyword does in that program is it tells the compiler (essentially) 'hey, I have a variable here that I don't want anyone else accessing, don't tell anyone else it exists'.

Inside a method, the static keyword tells the compiler the same as above, but also, 'don't tell anyone that this exists outside of this function, it should only be accessible inside this function'.

I hope this helps

4
  • 17
    Well, it's not actually the same. There's still the issue of scope on X. In this example, you could poke and futz with x in main; it is global. In the original example x was local to foo, only visible while inside that block, which is generally preferable: if foo exists to maintain x in predictable and visible ways, then letting others poke it is generally dangerous. As another benefit of keeping it in scope foo() It also keeps foo() portable. Jan 16, 2014 at 15:45
  • 2
    @user2149140 'don't tell anyone that this exists outside of this function, it should only be accessible inside this function'
    – DCShannon
    Nov 1, 2015 at 22:09
  • 3
    While you've addressed the issue of scope due to where the variable is declared, the description of static as affecting scope, rather than lifetime, seems incorrect.
    – DCShannon
    Nov 1, 2015 at 22:10
  • 1
    @Chameleon The question is tagged as c, so in this context, your example would be illegal at global scope. (C requires constant initializers for globals, C++ does not). Dec 26, 2018 at 19:00
10

6 7

compiler arranges that static variable initialization does not happen each time the function is entered

8

Output: 6,7

Reason

The declaration of x is inside foo but the x=5 initialization takes place outside of foo!

What we need to understand here is that

static int x = 5;

is not the same as

static int x;
x = 5;

Other answers have used the important words here, scope and lifetime, and pointed out that the scope of x is from the point of its declaration in the function foo to the end of the function foo. For example I checked by moving the declaration to the end of the function, and that makes x undeclared at the x++; statement.

So the static int x (scope) part of the statement actually applies where you read it, somewhere INSIDE the function and only from there onwards, not above it inside the function.

However the x = 5 (lifetime) part of the statement is initialization of the variable and happening OUTSIDE of the function as part of the program loading. Variable x is born with a value of 5 when the program loads.

I read this in one of the comments: "Also, this doesn't address the really confusing part, which is the fact that the initializer is skipped on subsequent calls." It is skipped on all calls. Initialization of the variable is outside of the function code proper.

The value of 5 is theoretically set regardless of whether or not foo is called at all, although a compiler might optimize the function away if you don't call it anywhere. The value of 5 should be in the variable before foo is ever called.

Inside of foo, the statement static int x = 5; is unlikely to be generating any code at all.

I found the address x uses when I put a function foo into a program of mine, and then (correctly) guessed that the same location would be used if I ran the program again. The partial screen capture below shows that x has the value 5 even before the first call to foo.

Break Point before first call to foo

5

A static variable inside a function has a lifespan as long as your program runs. It won't be allocated every time your function is called and deallocated when your function returns.

2
  • Saying this is like a "global" variable and then saying EXCEPT you can't access it is an oxymoron. Global means accessible anywhere. Which in this case of a static INSIDE a function it is NOT accessible everywhere. The issue in OP as others have noted is about scope and lifetime. Please don't confuse folks with using the term 'global' and misleading them on the scope of the variable.
    – ChuckB
    Sep 23, 2017 at 18:50
  • @ChuckB: Correct. Fixed it. Well it's been 6 years. My previous answer had the perception of 6 years ago!
    – Donotalo
    Oct 3, 2017 at 12:38
4

Let's just read the Wikipedia article on Static Variables...

Static local variables: variables declared as static inside a function are statically allocated while having the same scope as automatic local variables. Hence whatever values the function puts into its static local variables during one call will still be present when the function is called again.

4
  • 8
    That's terrible! "variables declared as static inside a function are statically allocated" - it explains nothing, unless you already know what it means!
    – user82238
    Feb 17, 2011 at 19:36
  • @Blank: well, that's what I thought the second sentence was for. Though I guess you're right, it should be better worded. Feb 17, 2011 at 19:43
  • 2
    Also, this doesn't address the really confusing part, which is the fact that the initializer is skipped on subsequent calls.
    – Tom Auger
    Nov 14, 2017 at 17:48
  • statically allocated means no stack, nor heap.
    – Chameleon
    Dec 21, 2018 at 13:40
3

Vadiklk,

Why ...? Reason is that static variable is initialized only once, and maintains its value throughout the program. means, you can use static variable between function calls. also it can be used to count "how many times a function is called"

main()
{
   static int var = 5;
   printf("%d ",var--);
   if(var)
      main();
} 

and answer is 5 4 3 2 1 and not 5 5 5 5 5 5 .... (infinite loop) as you are expecting. again, reason is static variable is initialized once, when next time main() is called it will not be initialize to 5 because it is already initialized in the program.So we can change the value but can not reinitialized. Thats how static variable works.

or you can consider as per storage: static variables are stored on Data Section of a program and variables which are stored in Data Section are initialized once. and before initialization they are kept in BSS section.

In turn Auto(local) variables are stored on Stack and all the variables on stack reinitialized all time when function is called as new FAR(function activation record) is created for that.

okay for more understanding, do the above example without "static" and let you know what will be the output. That make you to understand the difference between these two.

Thanks Javed

2

The output will be 6 7. A static variable (whether inside a function or not) is initialized exactly once, before any function in that translation unit executes. After that, it retains its value until modified.

3
  • 1
    Are you sure the static is initialised before the function is called, and not upon first call of the function? Nov 29, 2012 at 6:03
  • @JessePepper: At least if memory serves, this depends on whether you're talking about C++98/03 or C++11. In C++98/03, I believe it's as described above. In C++11, threading makes that essentially impossible to do, so initialization is done on first entry to the function. Nov 29, 2012 at 7:17
  • 2
    I think you're wrong actually. I think even pre C++11 it was only initialised when the function is called. This is important for a common solution to the static initialisation dependency problem. Nov 30, 2012 at 7:30
1

You will get 6 7 printed as, as is easily tested, and here's the reason: When foo is first called, the static variable x is initialized to 5. Then it is incremented to 6 and printed.

Now for the next call to foo. The program skips the static variable initialization, and instead uses the value 6 which was assigned to x the last time around. The execution proceeds as normal, giving you the value 7.

1
6 7

x is a global variable that is visible only from foo(). 5 is its initial value, as stored in the .data section of the code. Any subsequent modification overwrite previous value. There is no assignment code generated in the function body.

1

6 and 7 Because static variable intialise only once, So 5++ becomes 6 at 1st call 6++ becomes 7 at 2nd call Note-when 2nd call occurs it takes x value is 6 instead of 5 because x is static variable.

0

In C++11 at least, when the expression used to initialize a local static variable is not a 'constexpr' (cannot be evaluated by the compiler), then initialization must happen during the first call to the function. The simplest example is to directly use a parameter to intialize the local static variable. Thus the compiler must emit code to guess whether the call is the first one or not, which in turn requires a local boolean variable. I've compiled such example and checked this is true by seeing the assembly code. The example can be like this:

void f( int p )
{
  static const int first_p = p ;
  cout << "first p == " << p << endl ;
}

void main()
{
   f(1); f(2); f(3);
}

of course, when the expresion is 'constexpr', then this is not required and the variable can be initialized on program load by using a value stored by the compiler in the output assembly code.

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