1

Both create Gtk windows but I can't really understand what is going behind the scenes. I tried binding a signal to a button to quit the window but the program got a SIGSEGV when using Gtk::Application::create. When I changed the program to follow Gtk::Main conventions. Everything Worked fine.

Gtk::Application::create program(fails to work):

auto app = Gtk::Application::create(argc, argv);
Gtk::Button *button = new Gtk::Button("Quit");
button->signal_clicked().connect(sigc::ptr_fun(Gtk::Main::quit));
Gtk::Window window;
window.set_default_size(200, 200);
window.add(*button);
button->show();
return app->run(window);

Gtk::Main program(works):

auto app = Gtk::Main(argc, argv);
Gtk::Button *button = new Gtk::Button("Quit");
button->signal_clicked().connect(sigc::ptr_fun(app.quit));
Gtk::Window window;
window.set_default_size(200, 200);
window.add(*button);
button->show();
app.run(window);
return 0;
  • Hi, the documentations says following: While Gtk::Application works fine with plain Gtk::Windows, it is recommended to use it together with Gtk::ApplicationWindow. Maybe that's the problem. Try using Gtk::ApplicationWindow instead. – YesThatIsMyName May 15 '18 at 9:26
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Why doesn't it work

The first code gets SIGSEGV because you are calling static Gtk::Main::quit when using Gtk::Application.

You could probably use sigc::mem_fun to call Gio::Application::quit inherited in Gtk::Application but that's not a good idea when using Gtk::Application::run(Gtk::Window&):

If you call Gio::Application::quit() while a window is connected to the application, and then return from main() without removing the window from the application, the application's destructor will not be called.

And to be honest I don't know how, because Glib::RefPtr returned by Gtk::Application::create() doesn't have a way to get the object:

Unlike most other smart pointers, RefPtr doesn't support dereferencing through * object_ptr.

Close the window instead

From Gtk::Application::add_window(Gtk::Window&):

If all the windows managed by Gtk::Application are closed (hidden) or removed from the application then the call to run() will return.

#include <gtkmm.h>

int main()
{
    auto app = Gtk::Application::create();
    Gtk::Button *button = new Gtk::Button("Quit");
    Gtk::Window window;
    button->signal_clicked().connect(sigc::mem_fun(&window, &Gtk::Window::close));

    window.set_default_size(200, 200);
    window.add(*button);
    window.show_all(); //for some widgets (I don't remember which) show() is not enough
    return app->run(window);
}
0

With no information on the specific error, it is hard to know what the problem really is. One thing I see though is that you have no application ID. See this example. You can also check this to know more about applications IDs.

Basically, I would try something like:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    auto app = Gtk::Application::create(argc, argv, "org.gtkmm.example");
                                              //    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ <- add something like this (see below)
    Gtk::Button *button = new Gtk::Button("Quit");
    button->signal_clicked().connect(sigc::ptr_fun(Gtk::Main::quit));
    Gtk::Window window;
    window.set_default_size(200, 200);
    window.add(*button);
    button->show();
    return app->run(window);
}

Note that you can (and should) change the application ID for your own needs. Carefully read the second link to see the convention and choose your ID carefully.

Hope this helps!

  • Only app ids? I didn't know about them but it does seem useful. No comments on the differences? – Compro Prasad May 19 '18 at 12:03

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