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How do I add auto_increment to an existing column of a MySQL table?

10 Answers 10

121

I think you want to MODIFY the column as described for the ALTER TABLE command. It might be something like this:

ALTER TABLE users MODIFY id INTEGER NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT;

Before running above ensure that id column has a Primary index.

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  • 10
    Might also want to include the current column value as an offset, eg ALTER TABLE tbl AUTO_INCREMENT = 100; – Phil Feb 17 '11 at 23:20
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    If you already have values in the table, you'll probably get a duplicate key error for value of 1. To change the value of the AUTO_INCREMENT the table must be using the MyISAM engine. So go to the table properties, change the engine from say InnoDB to MyISAM, then change the AUTO_INCREMENT value to whatever should be next in your sequence. Once you apply those changes you can switch the engine back to whatever you where using. – sday Oct 1 '11 at 2:25
19

Method to add AUTO_INCREMENT to a table with data while avoiding “Duplicate entry” error:

  1. Make a copy of the table with the data using INSERT SELECT:

    CREATE TABLE backupTable LIKE originalTable; 
    INSERT backupTable SELECT * FROM originalTable;
    
  2. Delete data from originalTable (to remove duplicate entries):

    TRUNCATE TABLE originalTable;
    
  3. To add AUTO_INCREMENT and PRIMARY KEY

    ALTER TABLE originalTable ADD id INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT;
    
  4. Copy data back to originalTable (do not include the newly created column (id), since it will be automatically populated)

    INSERT originalTable (col1, col2, col3) 
    SELECT col1, col2,col3
    FROM backupTable;
    
  5. Delete backupTable:

    DROP TABLE backupTable;
    

I hope this is useful!

More on the duplication of tables using CREATE LIKE:

Duplicating a MySQL table, indexes and data

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  • If you have a large table...or you want to do things a little smarter replace step 1 with: CREATE TABLE backupTable LIKE originalTable; RENAME TABLE originalTable TO originalTable.old, backupTable TO originalTable; Skip step 2 or you will loose all your data. – Tim Martens Feb 24 '17 at 17:01
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    This looks very dangerous to me, because the records could easily end up with different id numbers than they started with. If other tables have foreign keys to originalTable or you care about the id numbers for other reasons, then I don't think you want to use this method. – Don Kirkby Mar 29 '18 at 18:00
  • @DonKirkby Thanks for pointing that out. It is unlikely that a non-unique id column was used in conjunction with a foreign key, but you are right. This method precisely does that. It rebuilds (or creates) all the ids for them to be unique. – Arian Acosta Mar 29 '18 at 18:23
  • This is a problem because anything using the data during TRUNCATE will see unepected behavior – KeatsKelleher Nov 17 '18 at 15:18
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Alter table table_name modify column_name datatype(length) AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY

You should add primary key to auto increment, otherwise you got error in mysql.

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    But if the column was already a primary key, you will get an error like "ERROR 1068 (42000): Multiple primary key defined". – Manish Bansal Dec 27 '18 at 10:29
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Simply just add auto_increment Constraint In column or MODIFY COLUMN :-

 ALTER TABLE `emp` MODIFY COLUMN `id` INT NOT NULL UNIQUE AUTO_INCREMENT FIRST;

Or add a column first then change column as -

1. Alter TABLE `emp` ADD COLUMN `id`;

2. ALTER TABLE `emp` CHANGE COLUMN `id` `Emp_id` INT NOT NULL UNIQUE AUTO_INCREMENT FIRST;
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  • That id column needs an INDEX, but not necessarily UNIQUE or PRIMARY KEY. A plain INDEX would allow you to manually add a dup value (which you won't do), but otherwise, it is just as good. – Rick James May 1 '19 at 17:44
4

This worked for me in case you want to change the AUTO_INCREMENT-attribute for a not-empty-table:

1.)Exported the whole table as .sql file
2.)Deleted the table after export
2.)Did needed change in CREATE_TABLE command
3.)Executed the CREATE_TABLE and INSERT_INTO commands from the .sql-file
...et viola

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  • You saved my day – nonabhai Sep 14 '20 at 14:09
1

I managed to do this with the following code:

ALTER TABLE `table_name`
CHANGE COLUMN `colum_name` `colum_name` INT(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT FIRST;

This is the only way I could make a column auto increment.

INT(11) shows that the maximum int length is 11, you can skip it if you want.

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  • FIRST is a good convention, but it is not a requirement. The (11) does nothing unless you also have ZEROFILL; don't bother specifying it. – Rick James May 1 '19 at 17:45
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Alter table table_name modify table_name.column_name data_type AUTO_INCREMENT;

eg:

Alter table avion modify avion.av int AUTO_INCREMENT;

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  • Welcome to SO, your answer already exists. Please format your source code and explain! – cSteusloff Apr 17 '18 at 7:14
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if you have FK constraints and you don't want to remove the constraint from the table. use "index" instead of primary. then you will be able to alter it's type to auto increment

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I had existing data in the first column and they were 0's. First I made the first column nullable. Then I set the data for the column to null. Then I set the column as an index. Then I made it a primary key with auto incrementing turned on. This is where I used another persons answer above:

ALTER TABLE `table_name` CHANGE COLUMN `colum_name` `colum_name` INT(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT FIRST;

This Added numbers to all the rows of this table starting at one. If I ran the above code first it wasn't working because all the values were 0's. And making it an index was also required before making it auto incrementing. Next I made the column a primary key.

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  • You could have used SET sql_mode='NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO'; And if that doesn't work because you have multiple zeros for some reason, you could use a row-counter to explicitly set all the rows to a new number. – mpen Sep 16 '20 at 6:07
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ALTER TABLE Table name ADD column datatype AUTO_INCREMENT,ADD primary key(column);
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  • Are you sure about this? The OP asked about eight years ago(!) how to modify an existing column – Nico Haase Jan 8 '19 at 13:54
  • sorry but he asked about how to modify an existing column, your answer doesn't have sense! – Leo Gasparrini Apr 9 '19 at 4:03

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