1

I'd like an interface for writing to an automatically resizing array. One way to do this is with a generic std::ostream *.

Then consider if ostringstream is the target:

void WritePNG(ostream *out, const uint8_t *pixels);

void *WritePNGToMemory(uint8_t *pixels)
{
  ostringstream out;
  WritePng(&out, pixels);

  uint8_t *copy = new uint8_t[out.tellp()];
  memcpy(copy, out.str().c_str(), out.tellp()];
  return copy;
}

But I want to avoid the memcpy(). Is there a way to take ownership of the array in the underlying stringbuf class and return that?

I get the feeling this can't be done using standard library, since the stream buffer might not even be a contiguous array.

  • No. You're not really supposed to hang on to the value returned by c_str() at all. – Kyle Huff May 16 '18 at 0:19
1

IIRC the whole reason stringstream exists (vs strstream) was to sort out the fuzzy questions of memory ownership that would come up by giving direct buffer access. e.g. I think that change was to specifically prevent what you are asking to do.

One way or another I think you'd have to do it yourself, by overriding the stream buffer. To answer a similar question I suggested something for input streams that wound up getting quite a few upvotes. But honestly I didn't know what I was talking about then, nor now when I suggest the following:

Hacking up this link from the web for doing an "uppercasing stream buffer" to one that just echoes and gives you a reference to its buffer might give:

#include <iostream>
#include <streambuf>

class outbuf : public std::streambuf {
    std::string data;

protected:
    virtual int_type overflow (int_type c) {
        if (c != EOF)
            data.push_back(c);
        return c;
    }

public:
    std::string& get_contents() { return data; }
};

int main() {
    outbuf ob;
    std::ostream out(&ob);
    out << "some stuff";
    std::string& data = ob.get_contents();
    std::cout << data;
    return 0;
}

I'm sure it's broken in all kinds of ways. But the uppercase-buffer-authors seemed to think that overriding the overflow() method alone would let them uppercase all output to the stream, so I guess one could argue that it's enough to see all output if writing to one's own buffer.

But even so, going one character at a time seems suboptimal...and who knows what overhead you get from inheriting from streambuf in the first place. Consult your nearest C++ iostream expert for what the actual right way is. But hopefully it's proof that something of the sort is possible.

1

If you're willing to use the old, deprecated <strstream> interface, this is fairly easy - just create a std::strstreambuf pointing at your storage, and it will work by magic. std::ostrstream even has a constructor to do this for you:

#include <iostream>
#include <strstream>

int main()
{
    char copy[32] = "";

    std::ostrstream(copy, sizeof copy) << "Hello, world!"
        << std::ends << std::flush;

    std::cout << copy << '\n';
}

With the more modern <sstream> interface, you need to access the string stream's buffer, and call pubsetbuf() to make it to point at your storage:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

int main()
{
    char copy[32] = "";

    {
        std::ostringstream out{};
        out.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(copy, sizeof copy);

        out << "Hello, world!" << std::ends << std::flush;
    }

    std::cout << copy << '\n';
}

Obviously, in both cases, you'll need a way to know in advance how much memory to allocate for copy, because you can't wait until tellp() is ready for you...

  • neat trick, but my output size is unknown (hopefully less than uncompressed size). But I think you're on to something. Can you use pubsetbuf() or set some internal variable to NULL to fool streambuf into thinking there's no memory to deallocate? – Yale Zhang May 16 '18 at 18:39
  • I think the only reasonable option would be to implement a buffer yourself - inherit from std::basic_stringbuf with a std::vector as storage - read about setp for an example using std::array. Because a vector can move its contents when it's resized, you'll need to override overflow() to call setp after using push_back or any other vector method that invalidates iterators. – Toby Speight May 31 '18 at 7:55
0

Here's the solution I ended up using. The idea is the same as the one proposed by HostileFork - only needing to implement overflow(). But as already hinted, it has much better throughput by buffering. It also optionally supports random access (seekp(), tellp()).

class MemoryOutputStreamBuffer : public streambuf
{
public:
    MemoryOutputStreamBuffer(vector<uint8_t> &b) : buffer(b)
    {
    }
    int_type overflow(int_type c)
    {
        size_t size = this->size();   // can be > oldCapacity due to seeking past end
        size_t oldCapacity = buffer.size();

        size_t newCapacity = max(oldCapacity + 100, size * 2);
        buffer.resize(newCapacity);

        char *b = (char *)&buffer[0];
        setp(b, &b[newCapacity]);
        pbump(size);
        if (c != EOF)
        {
            buffer[size] = c;
            pbump(1);
        }
        return c;
    }
  #ifdef ALLOW_MEM_OUT_STREAM_RANDOM_ACCESS
    streampos MemoryOutputStreamBuffer::seekpos(streampos pos,
                                                ios_base::openmode which)
    {
        setp(pbase(), epptr());
        pbump(pos);
        // GCC's streambuf doesn't allow put pointer to go out of bounds or else xsputn() will have integer overflow
        // Microsoft's does allow out of bounds, so manually calling overflow() isn't needed
        if (pptr() > epptr())
            overflow(EOF);
        return pos;
    }
    // redundant, but necessary for tellp() to work
    // https://stackoverflow.com/questions/29132458/why-does-the-standard-have-both-seekpos-and-seekoff
    streampos MemoryOutputStreamBuffer::seekoff(streamoff offset,
                                                ios_base::seekdir way,
                                                ios_base::openmode which)
    {
        streampos pos;
        switch (way)
        {
        case ios_base::beg:
            pos = offset;
            break;
        case ios_base::cur:
            pos = (pptr() - pbase()) + offset;
            break;
        case ios_base::end:
            pos = (epptr() - pbase()) + offset;
            break;
        }
        return seekpos(pos, which);
    }
#endif    
    size_t size()
    {
        return pptr() - pbase();
    }
private:
    std::vector<uint8_t> &buffer;
};

They say a good programmer is a lazy one, so here's an alternate implementation I came up with that needs even less custom code. However, there's a risk for memory leaks because it hijacks the buffer inside MyStringBuffer, but doesn't free MyStringBuffer. In practice, it doesn't leak for GCC's streambuf, which I confirmed using AddressSanitizer.

class MyStringBuffer : public stringbuf
{
public:
  uint8_t &operator[](size_t index)
  {
    uint8_t *b = (uint8_t *)pbase();
    return b[index];
  }
  size_t size()
  {
    return pptr() - pbase();
  }
};

// caller is responsible for freeing out
void Test(uint8_t *&_out, size_t &size)
{
  uint8_t dummy[sizeof(MyStringBuffer)];
  new (dummy) MyStringBuffer;  // construct MyStringBuffer using existing memory

  MyStringBuffer &buf = *(MyStringBuffer *)dummy;
  ostream out(&buf);

  out << "hello world";
  _out = &buf[0];
  size = buf.size();
}

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