The following code is a simplified example of a task I'm working on, using Python, that seems to be a natural fit for an OOP style:

class Foo:
  def __init__(self):
    self.x = 1
    self.y = 1
    self.z = 1
  def method(self):
    return bar(self.x,self.y,self.z)

def bar(x,y,z):
  return x+y+z

f = Foo()
print(f.method())

In the example code above, I have three instance variables in my object, but in my actual application it would be more like 10 or 15 variables, and if I implement what I have in mind in this style, then I'm going to end up with a lot of code that looks like this:

return bar(self.a.self.b,self.c,self.d,self.e,self.f,self.g,self.h,self.i)

Wow, it sure would be nice to be able to write this in a style more like this:

return bar(a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i)

That would be a lot more concise and readable. One way to do this might be to rewrite bar so that it takes a Foo object as an input rather than a bunch of scalar variables, but I would prefer not to do that. Actually, that would just push the syntactic cruft down into the bar function, where I guess I would have code that looked like this:

  def bar(f):
    return f.a+f.b+f.c

Is there a nicer way to handle this? My understanding is that without the "self.", I would be referencing class variables rather than instance variables. I thought about using a dictionary, but that seems even cruftier, with all the ["a"] stuff. Might there be some automated way to take a dictionary with keys like "a","b","c",... and kind of unload the values into local variables named a, b, c, and so on?

  • 1
    Without the self, you'd be referencing global variables, not class variables. – Bi Rico May 15 at 23:42

You can use __dict__ to create attributes from data of varying length, and then use classmethod to sum the attributes passed:

import string
class Foo:
  def __init__(self, data):
    self.__dict__ = dict(zip(string.ascii_lowercase, data))
  @classmethod
  def bar(cls, instance, vals = []):
    return sum(instance.__dict__.values()) if not vals else sum(getattr(instance, i) for i in vals)

f = Foo(range(20))
print(Foo.bar(f))
print(Foo.bar(f, ['a', 'c', 'e', 'k', 'm']))

Output:

190
28
  • ... why are you using a classmethod that you pass an instance to and ignore the class parameter? – juanpa.arrivillaga May 16 at 0:58

Well, you could do it like so if you really wanted to, but I would advice against it. What if you add a field to your class and so on? Also it just makes things more complicated.

class Foo:
  def __init__(self):
    self.x = 1
    self.y = 1
    self.z = 1
  def method(self):
    return bar(**vars(self))  # expand all attributes as arguments

def bar(x,y,z):
  return x+y+z

f = Foo()
print(f.method())
  • 1
    Dont use dir use vars and forgo the prop helper function. – juanpa.arrivillaga May 16 at 0:56

I think you're going about this the wrong way. You're correct that your examples are hard to read, but I don't think the root cause is Python's syntax. An argument list that contains 10-15 variables is going to be difficult to read in any programming languages. I think the problem is your program's structure. Instead of trying to find ways around Python's syntax and conventions, consider trying to refactor your program so your classes don't need so many attributes, or refactor your methods so they don't need to return so many attributes.

Unfortunately I can't help you do that without seeing the full version of your code, but Code Review Stack Exchange would be a good place to get some help with that. Reducing the number of values returned and not coming up with unconventional ways to list and manipulate your attributes will make your code easier to read and maintain, both for others and yourself in the future.

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