how to test a . function which actually modifies database without actually changing the data or the database state. How can we achieve it using dbunit ?

I have a model function

const newValue = await app.models.module.functionname({
       id: '005q21', typoe: 'XXX', isActive: false
});

which actually writes a row in db and return type of newValue is an object. How can i write a unit test which actually runs on production and validates the function against database without changing the live data . (using dbunit )

I am writing test for a node.js /sql application using mocha

How can i write a unit test which actually runs on production and validates the function against database

That's dbUnit standard functionality, so start with one of the *TestCase approaches such as PrepAndExpectedTestCase.

Just have dbUnit compare expected data and it will check the DB for you, non-destructively as normal.

without changing the live data

  1. Don't configure any prep data and it won't insert any rows.
  2. On the configured database tester, configure it to not update tables:

    a. Set the SetUpOperation to DatabaseOperation.NONE

    b. Set the TearDownOperation to DatabaseOperation.NONE

    Note that with TearDownOperation set to DatabaseOperation.NONE, the test-created row will remain in the database. This may be what you want, but typically want dbUnit to cleanup the created rows when done (all rows or the specific rows; see DatabaseOperation options).

  • The problem is that the application is in node.js and so are the unit test, and i couldn't find a dbunit equivalent using npm / node.js. I need to figure out a test strategy where a clean setup of database is craeted for each test, followed by the test itself. DB unit is an option but whats in node.js ? Please suggest – testtolearn May 16 at 13:57

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