35

So I am trying to learn react and got a little mixed up with understanding .bind(this) in the constructor. However I think I understand it now and just want to know why I would use that vs an arrow function in the onClick. See code below:

Binding method makes sure 'this' in eventClick function references the class

Class Click extends react.Component {
  constructor(props) {
   super(props)
   this.clickEvent = this.clickEvent.bind(this);
  }

  render = () => (
    <button onClick={this.clickEvent}>Click Me</button>
  )

  clickEvent() {console.log(this)} // 'this' refers to the class
}

However this method also references the class. Is there any pro/con to use one vs the other?

Class Click extends react.Component {

  render = () => (
    <button onClick={() => {this.clickEvent()}}>Click Me</button>
  )

  clickEvent() {console.log(this)} // 'this' refers to the class
}
2
  • Arrow functions are part of ES6. If you're not using ES6, then you have to bind this. That's one difference I can think of between the two. – Pat Mellon May 16 '18 at 16:08
  • 1
    () => {this.clickEvent()} – Yury Tarabanko May 16 '18 at 16:09
39

First of all, let's see an example of each technique.

Binding:

import React from 'react';
class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.clickHandler = this.clickHandler.bind(this);
  }

  clickHandler() {
    console.log( this )
  }

  render() {
    return <button onClick={this.clickHandler}>Click Me</button>
  }
}

Arrow-function:

import React from 'react';
class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
  }

  clickHandler = () => {
    console.log( this )
  }

  render() {
    return <button onClick={this.clickHandler}>Click Me</button>
  }
}

Pros and Cons:

Using the Arrow-function on public-class-field is more human-readable, because of fewer lines of code, But keep in mind that using Arrow-function can affect two things:

First the memory and performance; When you use a class field to define a function, your whole method resides on each instance of the class and NOT on the prototype, but using the bind technic, just a small callback is stored on each instance, which calls your method that is stored on the prototype.

Second thing that can be affected is how you write your unit tests. You won't be able to use the component prototype to stub on function calls like below:

const spy = jest.spyOn(MyComponent.prototype, 'clickHandler');
// ...
expect(spy).toHaveBeenCalled();

You will have to find another way to stub the method, either by passing the spy in props or checking the state changes.

Conclusion

Computers are really good at reading code; you shouldn’t worry about that. You may want to consider making your code more human-readable by using a class-property arrow-function.


But When you want to keep both human-readability and performance, consider using plugin-transform-arrow-functions plugin (although v7.2.0 caused problems for me), just run npm i --save-dev @babel/plugin-transform-arrow-functions and add it into your "babel.config.js" or ".babelrc" file, like:

{
  "presets": ["module:metro-react-native-babel-preset"],
  "plugins": [
    ["@babel/plugin-proposal-decorators", { "decoratorsBeforeExport": false }],
    ["@babel/plugin-transform-arrow-functions", { "spec": true }]
  ]
}

You could also use something like auto-bind decorator, which would turn above example into:

import React from 'react';
import { boundMethod as bind } from 'autobind-decorator';
class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
  }

  @bind
  clickHandler() {
    console.log( this )
  }

  render() {
    return <button onClick={this.clickHandler}>Click Me</button>
  }
}

Note: It is unnecessary to put @bind on every function. You only need to bind functions that you pass around. e.g. onClick={this.doSomething} Or fetch.then(this.handleDone)

25

Your second example recreates the function on every render. In your first, you create the bound function just once.

You could just create the handler in the constructor as an arrow function:

class Click extends react.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
    this.clickEvent = () => {   // ***
      console.log(this);        // ***
    };                          // ***
  }

  render = () => (
    <button onClick={this.clickEvent}>Click Me</button>
  )
}

Using the class fields proposal syntax (which is enabled in the transpiler settings of most React projects, and which you're using for your render function), you can write that like this:

class Click extends react.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
  }

  clickEvent = () => {          // ***
    console.log(this);          // ***
  };                            // ***

  render = () => (
    <button onClick={this.clickEvent}>Click Me</button>
  )
}

Which is the same thing.


Side note: You're creating a separate render function for each instance of your class. There's no need to do that, it can be on the prototype. So:

class Click extends react.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props)
  }

  clickEvent = () => {
    console.log(this);
  };

  render() {
    return <button onClick={this.clickEvent}>Click Me</button>;
  }
}

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