I have a basic rect component and I already figured out how to get data from a protected rest api, however I am not sure how to render it in the component and how to call that function, or in which lifecycle I should call the function.

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import LayoutContentWrapper from '../components/utility/layoutWrapper';
import LayoutContent from '../components/utility/layoutContent';
var q = require('q');

var Adal = require('../adal-webapi/adal-request');

function getValues() {
    var deferred = q.defer();
    Adal.adalRequest({
      url: 'https://abc.azurewebsites.net/api/values'
    }).then(function(data) {
      console.log(data);
    }, function(err) {
      deferred.reject(err);
    });
    return deferred.promise;
  }

export default class extends Component {



  render() {
    return (
      <LayoutContentWrapper style={{ height: '100vh' }}>
        <LayoutContent>
          <h1>Test Page</h1>
        </LayoutContent>
      </LayoutContentWrapper>
    );
  }
}
  • 2
    Easiest way is to put getValues inside the class. Then make a variable in this.state that you can assign the data you get from your API. Just render that this.state variable – Andrew May 16 at 20:33
  • Once you fetch your data from the server, you have to set it to state and then you can display it in your view. return block – Curious13 May 16 at 20:37
  • I don't think putting getValues into the component is necessary, if anything, I'd abstract it through a non-react class that only handles react requests. – Daniel May 16 at 21:35
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The lifecycle method you choose to fetch the data in will largely depend on whether or not you need to update the data at any point and re-render, or whether that data depends on any props passed to the component.

Your example looks as though it is a one time API call that doesn't depend on any props, so placing it in the constructor would be valid.

I would move the getValues code to within the class, and do something like this. Note: I've used async/await, but you could use promise callbacks if you prefer.

export default class MyComponent extends Component {
    constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.state = {
            data: []
        }
        this.fetchData();
    }

    async fetchData() {
        try {
            const data = await this.getValues();
            !this.isCancelled && this.setState({ data });
        } catch(error) {
            // Handle accordingly
        }
    }

    getValues() { 
        // Your API calling code
    }

    componentWillUnmount() {
        this.isCancelled = true;
    }

    render() {
        const { data } = this.state;
        return (
            <ul>
                {data && data.map(item => (
                    <li>{item.name}</li>
                ))}
            </ul>
        );
    }
}

If you needed to fetch the data again at any point, you might use one of the other lifecycle hooks to listen for prop changes, and call the fetchData method again.

Note the inclusion of a failsafe for the component un-mounting before the async call has finished, preventing React from throwing an error about setting state in an unmounted component.

  • Good call on cancelling request on unmount – Daniel May 16 at 21:32

something like this...

export default class extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
    // initialize myData to prevent render from running map on undefined
    this.state = {myData: []};
  }

  // use componentDidMount lifecycle method to call function
  componentDidMount() {
    // call your function here, and on promise execute `setState` callback
    getValues()
      .then(data => {
        this.setState({myData: data})
      }
  }

  render() {
    // create a list
    const items = this.state.myData.map((datum) => {
      return <LayoutContent>
        <h1>{datum}</h1>
      </LayoutContent>
   });

    // return with the list
    return (
      <LayoutContentWrapper style={{ height: '100vh' }}>
        {items}
      </LayoutContentWrapper>
    );
  }
}
  • I think running getValues in a componentDidMount is a better option. Also, you don't need to hold a temporary assignment of context when you use an arrow function. You can keep it as this.setState – Andrew May 16 at 21:16
  • updated the code. The convention is to use componentDidMount as it makes component extension more straight forward. – Daniel May 16 at 21:29
  • Yes I am aware, I just didn't want to come off as a dick :P. componentDidMount ensures render has already been run, and since setState is async, the sequence of events can get fumbled around when it's run in the constructor. – Andrew May 16 at 21:35
  • that part of the comment wasn't meant for you, just wanted to clarify the reason for updating – Daniel May 16 at 21:38

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