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I am currently doing a simulation experiment in R using a third party package (the package is iRF but in principle it doesn't matter what the package is) which appears to have a memory leak. A small example reproducing the problem is:

library(zeallot)
library(iRF)

simulate_data <- function() {
  X <- matrix(runif(300 * 50), nrow = 300)
  Y <- X[,1] + X[,2] + rnorm(nrow(X))
  return(list(X = X, Y = Y))
}

for(i in 1:10) {
  c(X, Y) %<-% simulate_data()
  fit <- iRF(X, Y)
  rm(fit)
  gc()
}

This uses just over 1Gb of ram. The package in question makes use of compiled C code, and presumably the memory leak is occuring there; hence, I cannot straight-forwardly free the memory in R. The question is: is there any way to get around this memory leak without restarting my R session? I'm not sure if this makes sense (I'm an ignorant statistician) but is there some way to nuke everything in the C world as though I reset the session? It is extremely inconvenient that if I want to replicate the experiment 1000 times I will have to reboot R or run out of memory.

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    Ultimately, I don't think you'll be able to harness that much control over R's memory management. Your best bet is to use some parallelization scheme with data/object-passing to calculate a portion of what you need, pass to the parent R session, then exit. – r2evans May 16 '18 at 20:46
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    you should email the maintainer or log an issue/pull request – rawr May 16 '18 at 20:48
  • @r2evans That works perfectly, thanks! If you want to convert that to an answer, I'll accept it unless somebody gives a much better answer within a few days. – guy May 16 '18 at 21:04
  • @rawr Right, I intend to, but I'm more interested in a general solution that is not contingent upon the maintainer doing something. – guy May 16 '18 at 21:08
  • @MrFlick I removed the edit, I will add it as an answer in a bit but wanted to give others an opportunity to answer first. – guy May 16 '18 at 21:28
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If you cannot fix the source, then your only option is to contain the problem. If the calculations can be broken into smaller components, you have a few options

  1. calculate what you can, save into .rda files, restart R, continue; or

  2. use a parallelization scheme such as future or parallel::parLapplyLB to farm out the processing into subordinate R sessions, capture the output, and allow the child processes to close.

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Following @r2evans advice, the issue can be bypassed through the use of parallel. The following code does not suffer from the memory leak:

library(zeallot)
library(iRF)
library(parallel)

simulate_data <- function() {
  X <- matrix(runif(300 * 50), nrow = 300)
  Y <- X[,1] + X[,2] + rnorm(nrow(X))
  return(list(X = X, Y = Y))
}

f <- function(i) {
  c(X, Y) %<-% simulate_data()
  return(iRF(X, Y))
}

for(i in 1:10) {
  cl <- makeCluster(1, "FORK")
  fit <- clusterApply(cl, 1, f)[[1]]
  stopCluster(cl)
}
  • I just larned about zeallot, interesting. Too bad, though, that the %<-% operator is popular, now I have to choose between zeallot and future (esp since I think it looks reasonable in both). – r2evans May 23 '18 at 11:23

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