2

How to implement the below trait for a vector of generic type Vec<T>?

For example, how to implement the below (working) Difference trait in a generic way (e.g. so that it is valid for Vec<i32>, Vec<f32>, Vec<f64>)?

trait Difference {
    fn diff(&self) -> Vec<f64>;
}

impl Difference for Vec<f64> {
    fn diff(&self) -> Vec<f64> {
        self.windows(2)
            .map(|slice| (slice[0] - slice[1]))
            .collect()
    }
}

fn main() {
    let vector = vec![1.025_f64, 1.028, 1.03, 1.05, 1.051];
    println!("{:?}", vector.diff());
}

From looking at the documentation, it seems like it should be something along the lines of:

trait Difference<Vec<T>> {
    fn diff(&self) -> Vec<T>;
}

impl Difference for Vec<T> {
    fn diff(&self) -> Vec<T> {
        self.windows(2)
            .map(|slice| (slice[0] - slice[1]))
            .collect()
    }
}

fn main() {
    let vector = vec![1.025_f64, 1.028, 1.03, 1.05, 1.051];
    println!("{:?}", vector.diff());
}

However the above results in:

error: expected one of `,`, `:`, `=`, or `>`, found `<`
 --> src/main.rs:2:21
  |
2 | trait Difference<Vec<T>> {
  |                     ^ expected one of `,`, `:`, `=`, or `>` here

I've tried a few other variations however all of them resulted in much longer error messages.

5

The correct syntax is:

trait Difference<T> { /* ... */ }

impl<T> Difference<T> for Vec<T> { /* ... */ }

Then you will need to require that T implements subtraction:

error[E0369]: binary operation `-` cannot be applied to type `T`
 --> src/main.rs:9:26
  |
9 |             .map(|slice| (slice[0] - slice[1]))
  |                          ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
  |
  = note: `T` might need a bound for `std::ops::Sub`

And that you can copy the values:

error[E0508]: cannot move out of type `[T]`, a non-copy slice
  --> src/main.rs:10:27
   |
10 |             .map(|slice| (slice[0] - slice[1]))
   |                           ^^^^^^^^ cannot move out of here
impl<T> Difference<T> for Vec<T>
where
    T: std::ops::Sub<Output = T> + Copy,
{
    // ...
}

Or that references to T can be subtracted:

impl<T> Difference<T> for Vec<T>
where
    for<'a> &'a T: std::ops::Sub<Output = T>,
{
    fn diff(&self) -> Vec<T> {
        self.windows(2)
            .map(|slice| &slice[0] - &slice[1])
            .collect()
    }
}

See also:

4
  • Thank you! I am still trying to get my head around lifetime syntax etc, one step at a time :) – Greg May 17 '18 at 0:18
  • I am trying to implement vector.abs() where abs() computes the absolute but std::ops does not seem to have a Absolute trait, how can other operations such as absolute be implemented? Should I make this a separate question? play.rust-lang.org/… – Greg May 17 '18 at 1:08
  • 1
    You may want to use num crate. – red75prime May 17 '18 at 4:02
  • @red75prime Thank you :) – Greg May 17 '18 at 4:14
2

You need to parameterise over T not Vec<T>. Then you'll also need to constrain T so that you can do subtraction (with the Sub trait) and so that the values can be copied in memory (with the Copy trait). Numeric types will mostly implement these traits.

use std::ops::Sub;

trait Difference<T> {
    fn diff(&self) -> Vec<T>;
}

impl<T> Difference<T> for Vec<T>
where
    T: Sub<Output = T> + Copy,
{
    fn diff(&self) -> Vec<T> {
        self.windows(2).map(|slice| slice[0] - slice[1]).collect()
    }
}

fn main() {
    let vector = vec![1.025_f64, 1.028, 1.03, 1.05, 1.051];
    println!("{:?}", vector.diff());
}
2
  • @Shepmaster, @Peter Hall What is the difference/significance between T: std::ops::Sub<Output = T> + Copy and for<'a> &'a T: std::ops::Sub<Output = T> ? – Greg May 17 '18 at 0:22
  • 2
    The latter works with references rather than copying. For most numeric types, copying is preferred because it's actually smaller than a pointer. Notice in that part of Shepmaster's answer that he changed the code a little, so that it is working with references. I'm going to say that the type syntax he's used there is a little advanced and you probably shouldn't worry about it if you are just starting out. – Peter Hall May 17 '18 at 0:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.