I'm currently making a system where a (ES6) class extends another. It receives an object of arguments, and some of them need to be supplied to the super() call because they're required in the base class, others are applied later in the constructor. Thing is, since this system will be used in many classes, I wanted to automatize the process by putting that logic inside a function. However, it appears I can't put super() inside of anything that isn't a class.

My current situation looks something like this:

class X extends Y {
    constructor(args) {
        applySuper(args, required_args);
        // args is an object 
        // required_args is a subset of args
    }
}

function applySuper(args, required_args) {
    // Uncaught SyntaxError: 'super' keyword unexpected here
    super(required_args.arg1, required_args.arg2, ...);

    // Find some way to separate the optional args and do something else with those... 
}

Any ideas?

  • Where does required_args come from? Is it extracted from args before the call to applySuper? – CertainPerformance May 17 at 5:16
  • well, this is the least important part, I just wanted to give some context and implementation in the applySuper function could change a bit regarding that. But let's say that required_args is an object which has a subset of key-value pairs found in args. Like, args = {one: 1, two: 2, three: 3} and required_args = {one: 1, three: 3}. The applySuper() function should call super() on the constructor it's called from (in this example, super(1,3), and do something else with the remaining arguments (in this case, two: 2). – Rafael May 17 at 5:24
  • ES6 classes are just regular JS objects, so you could place your super logic inside a regular function, and use call apply etc. – Keith May 17 at 5:30

I would do it with two distinct functions:

class X extends Y {
    constructor(args) {
        super(...baseArgs(args));
        otherArgs(this, args);
    }
}

function baseArgs(required_args) {
    return [required_args.arg1, required_args.arg2, …];
}
function otherArgs(instance, args) {
    // Find some way to separate the optional args and do something else with those... 
}

That said, you can put the super() call in an arrow function and pass that as a callback:

class X extends Y {
    constructor(args) {
        applyArgs(args, (...baseArgs) => {
            super(...baseArgs);
            return this;
        });
    }
}

function applyArgs(args, init) {
    const instance = init(args.arg1, args.arg2, …);
    // Find some way to separate the optional args and do something else with those... 
}

But really, if multiple classes should share the same behaviour, why not just give them the same superclass?

class Z extends Y {
    constructor(args) {
        super(args.arg1, args.arg2, …);
        // Find some way to separate the optional args and do something else with those... 
    }
}
class X extends Z {}
  • My intention was to put all logic in an external function. So, while using super() then a function call solves the issue, I'd rather call only one function as that'll appear several times. The problem of having the classes inherit each other is that my classes are already inheriting from classes of a third-party library. – Rafael May 17 at 14:07
  • @Rafael The alternative solutions would be a) use a static (inheritable) method instead of the constructor b) create the classes that are so similar as closures. Why do you even have so complicated stuff in your constructor? It would help if you could post your actual code (of all classes) so that I can suggest the appropriate pattern. – Bergi May 17 at 15:37

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