I have one question:

int swapnum( int x, int y )
{
   int tempnum ;
   tempnum = x ;
   x = y ;
   y = tempnum ;
   return tempnum;

}
int swapnum(int, int);
int main( )
{
    int x = 35, y = 45 ;
    printf("Before swapping: %d, %d", x, y);
    swapnum(x, y);
    printf("\nAfter swapping: %d, %d", x, y);
    return 0;
}

I have found this example in internet which demonstrates how call by value works. I understand everything except one thing. For what do we need call by value if we do not get changed result in main? I understood idea of call by reference; we will receive changed result but for what do we need call by value if result is changed only locally (in upper part of this code) and main stays unchanged (printf("\nAfter swapping: %d, %d", x, y);)? And if you write your example too to demonstrate it would be great.

  • With call-by-value functions are more close to mathematical functions, and are then much more easily composed. – Jean-Baptiste Yunès May 17 at 5:19
  • it allows you to send values without worrying that some function will change them. It's very convenient. – njzk2 May 17 at 5:19
  • This example does not make any sense. It will be optimized out by any compiler – P__J__ May 17 at 5:20
  • Read this cs.stackexchange.com/questions/23246/… – achal May 17 at 5:24
  • How would you want printf() to change the variables in your code? – Ulrich Eckhardt May 17 at 5:28
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are even functions which do not return anything. They have a prototype like

void useTwoNums(int, int);

They illustrate even better than your example that it is not necessary to return anything, even less something which somehow uses the two input parameters and/or depends on them.

The concept which you seem to be missing is the difference between "functions" in mathematical context and "functions" in programming. In programming a function might well do something without returning something. One example is a function which just nicely prints the input values, compare printf(),
http://en.cppreference.com/w/c/io/fprintf Its return value can be handled inside the return-value-free function to illustrate.

The extreme case would be a function with neither parameters nor return value:
void DoSomethingInFreespace(void);. Functions like that can achieve the data to process e.g. via other input channels. Or they are simply refactored pieces of code, e.g. for reuse, which have a sufficiently rich context, e.g. global or file local variables.

To make the answer more complete, I will integrate some points from comments (including the one by OP, which focuses on return values): With call-by-value functions are more close to mathematical functions, and are then much more easily composed. (Jean-Baptiste Yunès). and it allows you to send values without worrying that some function will change them. It's very convenient. (njzk2) Both (and other, too) stress that a mathematical function does not alter the parameters; this is something of a "promise" which programmers appreciate.

Turning it around: when using call by value if you want that [a value in the context outside of the function, e.g.] main be changed we must return the result (OP)

Different angle:
when using call by reference, we don't need to return; it [the parameter] itself changes [outside of the context of the called function and can be used as a] result (OP)

  • oh so when using call by value if you want that main be changed we must return the result and when using call by reference we dont need to return it itself changes result.but it changes everything in main too.that's why call by value is more convenient , we will return answer which we got but in main arguments will not change.right?did I understand correctly? – ႨႰ ႠႩ ႪႨ May 17 at 5:36
  • Yes, I think you pretty much got the point. – Yunnosch May 17 at 5:37
  • oh thank you very much thanks.you helped me very much.)) – ႨႰ ႠႩ ႪႨ May 17 at 5:38
  • @Yunnosch the new title is certainly catchier, but doesn't it change the meaning? – Ajay Brahmakshatriya May 17 at 6:13
  • @AjayBrahmakshatriya First of all, thanks for your input. I am of course convinced that I did not change the meaning. But if you would elaborate and maybe point out which part I accidentally changed, then I will happily undo or improve. To explain, I am convinced that the question is caused by OP wondering/confused about this aspect of the chosen example. – Yunnosch May 17 at 6:18

I have found this example in internet which demonstrates how works call by value. I understand everything except one thing: for what do we need call by value?

You don't need call-by-value. But call-by-value is how C works, and most programming languages actually, so you would do well to learn it.

I understood idea of call by reference, we will receive changed result but for what do we need call by value if result is changed only locally

Call-by-value is used in most programming languages because it makes it easier to think about the code. When you see doStuff(x, y); you know that x and y won't change. They can only change if you write doStuff(&x, &y); or x = doStuff(y); or something like that. You don't need go and look up the DoStuff Manual to find out whether doStuff is supposed to change them.

and if you write your example too to demonstrate it would be great.

There's really nothing to demonstrate; the point of call-by-value is that nothing happens. Do you want a demonstration of nothing happening?

The return value is useful when you have formulas. If you want to calculate the hypotenus from the cathetus and you pass the value of the latters, you do not want theit value modified.

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