9

I'm trying to get a webservice up and running that actually requires to check whois databases. What I'm doing right now is ugly and I'd like to avoid it as much as I can: I call gwhois command and parse its output. Ugly.

I did some search to try to find a pythonic way to do this task. Generally I got quite much nothing - this old discussion list link has a way to check if domain exist. Quite not what I was looking for... But still, it was best anwser Google gave me - everything else is just a bunch of unanwsered questions.

Any of you have succeeded to get some method up and running? I'd very much appreciate some tips, or should I just do it the opensource-way, sit down and code something by myself? :)

5

There's nothing wrong with using a command line utility to do what you want. If you put a nice wrapper around the service, you can implement the internals however you want! For example:

class Whois(object):
    _whois_by_query_cache = {}

    def __init__(self, query):
        """Initializes the instance variables to defaults. See :meth:`lookup`
        for details on how to submit the query."""
        self.query = query
        self.domain = None
        # ... other fields.

    def lookup(self):
        """Submits the `whois` query and stores results internally."""
        # ... implementation

Now, whether or not you roll your own using urllib, wrap around a command line utility (like you're doing), or import a third party library and use that (like you're saying), this interface stays the same.

This approach is generally not considered ugly at all -- sometimes command utilities do what you want and you should be able to leverage them. If speed ends up being a bottleneck, your abstraction makes the process of switching to a native Python implementation transparent to your client code.

Practicality beats purity -- that's what's Pythonic. :)

  • Yeah, I know. But, using too many of system tools and building wrappers around them makes it harder to, lets say, migrate application to other system... But I guess I'll stick to what I got now, if it works ;) – kender Sep 11 '08 at 19:50
  • 3
    With a good abstraction barrier you can implement it whenever it's convenient! "Now is better than never, Although never is often better than right now." :) – cdleary Sep 11 '08 at 19:59
  • 1
    @kender: it makes it easier! You just have to switch the internals from gwhois to Xwhois. If you also want to keep to old implementation you can extend the old class and just override for example the lookup method. – hopla Apr 12 '12 at 15:17
  • This is completely wrong! Do not shell out to run a whois command. At the very least just open a TCP socket to port 43 and read RFC3912. This has nothing to do with practicality, running a shell command like that will only generate a bunch of security and performance issues. It is not the good way to resolve the issue. – Patrick Mevzek Jan 4 '18 at 21:35
8

Look at this: http://code.google.com/p/pywhois/

pywhois - Python module for retrieving WHOIS information of domains

Goal: - Create a simple importable Python module which will produce parsed WHOIS data for a given domain. - Able to extract data for all the popular TLDs (com, org, net, ...) - Query a WHOIS server directly instead of going through an intermediate web service like many others do. - Works with Python 2.4+ and no external dependencies

Example:

>>> import pywhois
>>> w = pywhois.whois('google.com')
>>> w.expiration_date
['14-sep-2011']
>>> w.emails
['contact-admin@google.com',
 'dns-admin@google.com',
 'dns-admin@google.com',
 'dns-admin@google.com']
>>> print w
...
6

Found this question in the process of my own search for a python whois library.

Don't know that I agree with cdleary's answer that using a library that wraps a command is always the best way to go - but I can see his reasons why he said this.

Pro: cmd-line whois handles all the hard work (socket calls, parsing, etc)

Con: not portable; module may not work depending on underlying whois command. Slower, since running a command and most likely shell in addition to whois command. Affected if not UNIX (Windows), different UNIX, older UNIX, or older whois command

I am looking for a whois module that can handle whois IP lookups and I am not interested in coding my own whois client.

Here are the modules that I (lightly) tried out and more information about it:

pywhoisapi:

  • Home: http://code.google.com/p/pywhoisapi/
  • Design: REST client accessing ARIN whois REST service
  • Pros: Able to handle IP address lookups
  • Cons: Able to pull information from whois servers of other RIRs?

BulkWhois

  • Home: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/BulkWhois/0.2.1
  • Design: telnet client accessing whois telnet query interface from RIR(?)
  • Pros: Able to handle IP address lookups
  • Cons: Able to pull information from whois servers of other RIRs?

pywhois:

  • Home: http://code.google.com/p/pywhois/
  • Design: REST client accessing RRID whois services
  • Pros: Accessses many RRIDs; has python 3.x branch
  • Cons: does not seem to handle IP address lookups

python-whois:

whoisclient - fork of python-whois

Update: I ended up using pywhoisapi for the reverse IP lookups that I was doing

4

Here is the whois client re-implemented in Python: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/577364-whois-client/

1

I don't know if gwhois does something special with the server output; however, you can plainly connect to the whois server on port whois (43), send your query, read all the data in the reply and parse them. To make life a little easier, you could use the telnetlib.Telnet class (even if the whois protocol is much simpler than the telnet protocol) instead of plain sockets.

The tricky parts:

  • which whois server will you ask? RIPE, ARIN, APNIC, LACNIC, AFRINIC, JPNIC, VERIO etc LACNIC could be a useful fallback, since they tend to reply with useful data to requests outside of their domain.
  • what are the exact options and arguments for each whois server? some offer help, others don't. In general, plain domain names work without any special options.
  • real problem is not in the querying of servers- but parsing their outputs. sadly, what they return the format changes a lot between servers. One of lines, expiration time, can look like: Expiration Date:05-Sep-2009 15:24:49 UTC or Expires on: 26-Dec-14 or, some servers dont give that at all. – kender Sep 29 '08 at 10:16
  • They're both part of the problem. In my case, it was hard enough to find the correct (authoritative) whois server in every case. Parsing the data wasn't as hard, since we were interested basically in parent subnets, so with a little trial&error we were done. Can't provide code, though, sorry. – tzot Sep 29 '08 at 15:22
0

Another way to do it is to use urllib2 module to parse some other page's whois service (many sites like that exist). But that seems like even more of a hack that what you do now, and would give you a dependency on whatever whois site you chose, which is bad.

I hate to say it, but unless you want to re-implement whois in your program (which would be re-inventing the wheel), running whois on the OS and parsing the output (ie what you are doing now) seems like the right way to do it.

  • No, you should not run the whois command from your program. Whois is a very simple protocol to implement, just open a TCP socket to port 43 and read RFC3912. – Patrick Mevzek Jan 4 '18 at 21:36
0

Parsing another webpage woulnd't be as bad (assuming their html woulnd't be very bad), but it would actually tie me to them - if they're down, I'm down :)

Actually I found some old project on sourceforge: rwhois.py. What scares me a bit is that their last update is from 2003. But, it might seem as a good place to start reimplementation of what I do right now... Well, I felt obligued to post the link to this project anyway, just for further reference.

  • Well, what has really changed about whois in the last 5 years. I would venture to guess "not much". I still think you are re-inventing the wheel. My ideal answer is: use what is working for you now unless you perceive a real problem with it. – Justin Standard Sep 8 '08 at 21:09
0
import socket
socket.gethostbyname_ex('url.com')

if it returns a gaierror you know know it's not registered with any DNS

  • 1
    -1 = Doing a DNS query is not the same as a whois query – Lars Nordin Feb 11 '14 at 14:27
0

here is a ready-to-use solution that works for me; written for Python 3.1 (when backporting to Py2.x, take special care of the bytes / Unicode text distinctions). your single point of access is the method DRWHO.whois(), which expects a domain name to be passed in; it will then try to resolve the name using the provider configured as DRWHO.whois_providers[ '*' ] (a more complete solution could differentiate providers according to the top level domain). DRWHO.whois() will return a dictionary with a single entry text, which contains the response text sent back by the WHOIS server. Again, a more complete solution would then try and parse the text (which must be done separately for each provider, as there is no standard format) and return a more structured format (e.g., set a flag available which specifies whether or not the domain looks available). have fun!

##########################################################################
import asyncore as                                   _sys_asyncore
from asyncore import loop as                         _sys_asyncore_loop
import socket as                                     _sys_socket



##########################################################################
class _Whois_request( _sys_asyncore.dispatcher_with_send, object ):
  # simple whois requester
  # original code by Frederik Lundh

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  whoisPort = 43

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def __init__(self, consumer, host, provider ):
    _sys_asyncore.dispatcher_with_send.__init__(self)
    self.consumer = consumer
    self.query    = host
    self.create_socket( _sys_socket.AF_INET, _sys_socket.SOCK_STREAM )
    self.connect( ( provider, self.whoisPort, ) )

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def handle_connect(self):
    self.send( bytes( '%s\r\n' % ( self.query, ), 'utf-8' ) )

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def handle_expt(self):
    self.close() # connection failed, shutdown
    self.consumer.abort()

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def handle_read(self):
    # get data from server
    self.consumer.feed( self.recv( 2048 ) )

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def handle_close(self):
    self.close()
    self.consumer.close()


##########################################################################
class _Whois_consumer( object ):
  # original code by Frederik Lundh

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def __init__( self, host, provider, result ):
    self.texts_as_bytes = []
    self.host           = host
    self.provider       = provider
    self.result         = result

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def feed( self, text ):
    self.texts_as_bytes.append( text.strip() )

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def abort(self):
    del self.texts_as_bytes[:]
    self.finalize()

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def close(self):
    self.finalize()

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def finalize( self ):
    # join bytestrings and decode them (witha a guessed encoding):
    text_as_bytes         = b'\n'.join( self.texts_as_bytes )
    self.result[ 'text' ] = text_as_bytes.decode( 'utf-8' )


##########################################################################
class DRWHO:

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  whois_providers = {
    '~isa':   'DRWHO/whois-providers',
    '*':      'whois.opensrs.net', }

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def whois( self, domain ):
    R         = {}
    provider  = self._get_whois_provider( '*' )
    self._fetch_whois( provider, domain, R )
    return R

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def _get_whois_provider( self, top_level_domain ):
    providers = self.whois_providers
    R         = providers.get( top_level_domain, None )
    if R is None:
      R = providers[ '*' ]
    return R

  #-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  def _fetch_whois( self, provider, domain, pod ):
    #.....................................................................
    consumer  = _Whois_consumer(           domain, provider, pod )
    request   = _Whois_request(  consumer, domain, provider )
    #.....................................................................
    _sys_asyncore_loop() # loops until requests have been processed


#=========================================================================
DRWHO = DRWHO()


domain    = 'example.com'
whois     = DRWHO.whois( domain )
print( whois[ 'text' ] )

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