I want to know if, in this code,

sub might-sink {
    return [1,2,Failure.new("boo!"),"still here"];
}

might-sink;
say might-sink;

the first call to might-sink in sink context actually calls List.sink, that is, does nothing. My hunch is that it does, but I'm not sure if that's the case or it's simply not reified, so the failure is not thrown until later. I have tried the debugging options here, but none of them gets into the code called from this one. So two questions, separated but related:

  1. How can I debug into those functions using the Perl 6 debugger or a module?
  2. How can I find out if that List.sink is actually called or, in general, if sink is called when an object finds itself in sink context?
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Even if you explicitly called .sink on that return value, the Failure would not blow up:

sub might-sink {
    return [1,2,Failure.new("boo!"),"still here"];
}

might-sink.sink;
say "Did not explode";
# OUTPUT: Did not explode

The explosion in your code happens during rendition of .gist during say call which goes through first 100 elements of your Array and calls .gist on them. When it does so on the Failure element, it detonates it.

You're conflating sinking the list object itself and sinking individual values it contains. You correctly mentioned List.sink is a no-op, but Seq.sink consumes itself¹, yet it won't explode either, because just the Seq is being sunk, not its individual elements: (+"a", 42).Seq.sink

If you want to force potential Failure explosions, you could:

1: use fatal. This will cause the compiler to fatalize failures, causing their detonation in many places where Failures are passed around. This is a lexical pragma and it's also automatically enabled in try {} blocks.

use fatal;
sub might-sink {
    return [1,2,Failure.new("boo!"),"still here"];
}
might-sink;

# OUTPUT:
# boo!
#  in block <unit> at

2: Hyper over .self method call. It's provided by Mu (so is inherited by all objects) and simply returns self, so it's a no-op (other than doing a decont). However, since most methods called on armed Failure cause them to detonate, calling .self on them will cause them to blow up.

sub might-sink {
    return [1,2,Failure.new("boo!"),"still here"];
}
might-sink».self;

# OUTPUT:
# boo!
#  in block <unit> at

How can I debug into those functions using the Perl 6 debugger or a module?

Don't use debuggers myself, but perl6-debug-m should come preinstalled with your Rakudo installation. It requires you install Debugger::UI::CommandLine module. And you just use that instead of perl6 to run your program and it should offer some instructions on the command line on what it does. There's also a blog post on it and a video (requires Flash to play).

There's also a recently-released, alpha-quality App::MoarVM::Debug that lets you debug programs even remotely. Its beauty is it lets you dump object guts and navigate them while program is running, so if you can bear with its interface, it can be handy.

Personally, I debug by just using dd routine to dump stuff out in strategic points and see if it contains the things I expect it to contains.

How can I find out if that List.sink is actually called or, in general, if sink is called when an object finds itself in sink context?

You can mix-in a role using does or but operators that provides a sink method that does something you can watch. Like print something:

sub foo {
    return [<a b c>] does role { 
        method sink { say "sink called" }
    }
}
foo
# OUTPUT: sink called

A more advanced method would be dumping post-optimization QAST tree and seeing if it contains the calls you expect it to. CoreHackers::Q module makes the dumped QAST tree easier to visualize.

P.S.: on the topic of implied sinkage, it's worth noting R#1571 that enumerates several bugs with it and proposes the internal systems handling sinkage be redesigned entirely.


¹ - more accurately, Seq.sink calls .sink-all on its Iterator, which by default does simply consume the values, but custom iterators can override that method to be a no-op too.

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