1

Example: I have this netmask: 255.255.255.0

Is there, in bash, a command or a simple script to convert my netmask in notation /24?

  • Simple Python script (not posting as an answer because of that): import ipaddress,math;print("/" + str(32-math.ceil(math.log2(int(ipaddress.IPv4Address(input()))^2**32-1)))) – L3viathan May 18 '18 at 14:36
2

Example Function for RHEL6/RHEL7:

IPprefix_by_netmask() {
#function returns prefix for given netmask in arg1
 ipcalc -p 1.1.1.1 $1 | sed -n 's/^PREFIX=\(.*\)/\/\1/p'
}

The Result:

$ IPprefix_by_netmask 255.255.255.0
/24

In other Linux distributives ipcalc options may differ.

The same function without ipcalc, tested in Solaris and Linux:

IPprefix_by_netmask() {
    #function returns prefix for given netmask in arg1
    bits=0
    for octet in $(echo $1| sed 's/\./ /g'); do 
         binbits=$(echo "obase=2; ibase=10; ${octet}"| bc | sed 's/0//g') 
         let bits+=${#binbits}
    done
    echo "/${bits}"
}
  • 1
    The ipcalc version of the function outputs nothing on my system, (Lubuntu v17.10). Running ipcalc -p 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 returns an "Unknown option: -p" error. ipcalc version is 0.41-5. – agc May 18 '18 at 21:56
  • This works: ipcalc -n 1.1.1.1 $1 | sed -n '/^Netm/{s#.*= #/#;s/ .*//p;q}' – agc May 18 '18 at 22:13
  • or ipcalc -nb 1.1.1.1 "$1" | sed -n '/Netmask/s/^.*=[ ]/\//p – David C. Rankin May 18 '18 at 23:14
1
  1. Function using subnetcalc:

    IPprefix_by_netmask() {
        subnetcalc 1.1.1.1 "$1" -n  | sed -n '/^Netw/{s#.*/ #/#p;q}'
    }
    
  2. In pure bash, convert IP to a long octal string and sum its bits:

    IPprefix_by_netmask () { 
       c=0 x=0$( printf '%o' ${1//./ } )
       while [ $x -gt 0 ]; do
           let c+=$((x%2)) 'x>>=1'
       done
       echo /$c ; }
    

Output of IPprefix_by_netmask 255.255.255.0 (either function):

/24

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.