36

I have the following string:


str1 = "cat-one,cat2,cat-3";
OR
str1 = "catone,cat-2,cat3";
OR
str1 = "catone";
OR
str1 = "cat-one";

The point here is words may/may not have "-"s in it

Using regex: How could I extract the 1st word?

Appreciate any help on this.

Thanks, L

4
  • 1
    This matches all characters up to the first comma: ^[^,]+ Feb 18, 2011 at 12:52
  • This is what I tried (and works!) and hope that's right: alert ( str.replace (/^([^,]+)(.*)?/, "$1") );
    – lshettyl
    Feb 18, 2011 at 13:23
  • If that's really all you want to do, this would work just as well: alert(str.substring(0, str.indexOf(','))) Feb 18, 2011 at 14:11
  • 1
    (.*)? in your regex is totally unnecessary. Feb 18, 2011 at 15:35

3 Answers 3

75

It's pretty easy, just include allowed characters in brackets:

^([\w\-]+)

5
  • 1
    He said extract, so I assumed it needed the parentheses. Feb 18, 2011 at 13:02
  • I'm new here, so I may be missing something, but I copied "^([\w-])+" from your (temporary?) answer to test it. Feb 18, 2011 at 13:12
  • 1
    @Ekkehard Apologies; I caught a typo in my answer seconds after I posted it, and you must have seen it before I corrected it. Feb 18, 2011 at 14:26
  • 2
    Can you explain what does the () does and the first ^?
    – Herbert
    Feb 13, 2017 at 16:43
  • ^([^\w])*([\w\-]+) also considers possible preceeding spaces or non-word characters
    – Ian Carter
    Jan 30 at 22:20
1

An approach not using a regex: assuming the first word is delimited always by a comma "," you can do this:

var str1 = "cat-one";
var i = str1.indexOf(",");
var firstTerm = i == -1 ? str1 : str1.substring(0, i);

Edit: Assumed this was a javascript question, for some reason.

2
  • 1
    regex is actually easier this time, I think. :) He also didn't say he was using javascript. Feb 18, 2011 at 12:56
  • 1
    @Seth: yeah, you are right. Dunno why I thought was js. Perhaps because no type definition?
    – Richard H
    Feb 18, 2011 at 12:59
1

If someone, one day would like to do it in Swift here you go with an extension :

extension String {

    func firstWord() -> String? {
        var error : NSError?
        let internalExpression = NSRegularExpression(pattern: "^[a-zA-Z0-9]*", options: .CaseInsensitive, error: &error)!
        let matches = internalExpression.matchesInString(self, options: nil, range:NSMakeRange(0, countElements(self)))
        if (matches.count > 0) {
            let range = (matches[0] as NSTextCheckingResult).range
            return (self as NSString).substringWithRange(range)
        }
        return nil
    }
}

To use it just write:

myString.firstWord()
2
  • In this case Richard H's answer of avoiding the direct regular expression is probably best and just use this Swift expression; str.componentsSeparatedByString(",")[0] Jan 31, 2015 at 4:22
  • Indeed you are right. But if you are looking for something for generic then I would avoid using hard-coded "," solutions. Maybe next time the separator could be "_", "-", ".", etc. Feb 2, 2015 at 10:55

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