I am hoping to build a tree in which a node is an English word and a branch of leaves form a sentence. Namely, a sentence tree (plz ignore the numbers):

I was thinking to use a Trie but I am having trouble with inserting the nodes. I am not sure how to determine the level of the nodes. In a Trie, all the nodes are characters so it's possible to use . But having words is different.

Does it make sense? I am open to other data structures as well. The goal is to create a dictionary/corpus which stores a bunch of English sentences. Users can use the first a couple of words to look up the whole sentence. I am most proficient in Java but I also know python and R so if they are easier to use for my purposes.

Thank you!

void insert(String key) {
    int level;
    int length = key.length();
    int index;

    TrieNode pCrawl = root;

    for (level = 0; level < length; level++)
    {
        index = key.charAt(level) - 'a';
        if (pCrawl.children[index] == null)
            pCrawl.children[index] = new TrieNode();

        pCrawl = pCrawl.children[index];
    }

    // mark last node as leaf
    pCrawl.isEndOfWord = true;
}

A little late, but maybe I can help a bit even now.

A trie sorts each level by unique key. Traditionally this is a character from a string, and the value stored at the final location is the string itself.

Tries can be much more than this. If I understand you correctly then you wish to sort sentences by their constituent words.

At each level of your trie you look at the next word and seek its position in the list of children, rather than looking at the next character. Unfortunately all the traditional implementations show sorting by character.

I have a solution for you, or rather two. The first is to use my java source code trie. This sorts any object (in your case the string containing your sentence) by an Enumeration of integers. You would need to map your words to integers (store words in trie give each a unique number), and then write an enumerator that returned the wordIntegers for a sentence. That would work. (Do not use hash for the word -> integer conversion as two words can give the same hash).

The second solution is to take my code and instead of comparing integers compare the words as strings. This would take more work, but looks entirely feasible. In fact, I have had a suspicion that my solution can be made more generic by replacing Enumeration of Integer with an Enumeration of Comparable. If you wish to do this, or collaborate in doing this I would be interested. Heck, I may even do it myself for the fun of it.

The resultant trie would have generic type

Trie<K extends Comparable, T> 

and would store instances of T against a sequence of K. The coder would need to define a method

Iterator<K extends Comparable> getIterator(T t)

============================ EDIT: ========================

It was actually remarkably easy to generalise my code to use Comparable instead of Integer. Although there are plenty of warnings that I am using raw type of Comparable rather than Comparable. Maybe I will sort those out another day.

SentenceSorter sorter = new SentenceSorter();
sorter.add("This is a sentence.");
sorter.add("This is another sentence.");
sorter.add("A sentence that should come first.");
sorter.add("Ze last sentence");
sorter.add("This is a sentence that comes somewhere in the middle.");
sorter.add("This is another sentence entirely.");

Then listing sentences by:

Iterator<String> it = sorter.iterator();
while (it.hasNext()) {
    System.out.println(it.next()); 
}

gives

A sentence that should come first.
This is a sentence that comes somewhere in the middle.
This is a sentence.
This is another sentence entirely.
This is another sentence.

Note that the sentence split is including the full stop with the ord and that is affecting the sort. You could improve upon this.

We can show that we are sorting by words rather than characters:

it = sorter.sentencesWithPrefix("This is a").iterator();
while (it.hasNext()) {
    System.out.println(it.next()); 
}

gives

This is a sentence that comes somewhere in the middle.
This is a sentence.

whereas

it = sorter.sentencesWithPrefix("This is another").iterator();
while (it.hasNext()) {
    System.out.println(it.next()); 
}

gives

This is another sentence entirely.
This is another sentence.

Hope that helps - the code is all up on the above mentioned repo, and freely available under Apache2.

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