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I have a dataframe with information from a message board. The data looks like this:

    require(dplyr)
    require(tidyr)
    df <- data.frame(author = c(2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024),
             topic = c(101,101,101,101,301,301,501,501,501,501),
             time = c("2014-08-16 20:20:11", "2014-08-16 21:10:00", "2014-08-17 06:30:10",
                        "2014-08-17 10:08:32", "2014-08-20 22:23:01","2014-08-20 23:03:03",
                        "2014-08-25 17:05:01", "2014-08-25 19:15:10",  "2014-08-25 20:07:11",
                        "2014-08-25 23:59:59"))

I want to find all the unique combinations of author by topic. My goal is to create an undirected graph with edges categorized by topic and time frame. I use the following code to get this:

test <- df %>% group_by(topic) %>% expand(nesting(author), author)
print(test, n = 20)

# A tibble: 36 x 3
# Groups:   topic [3]
topic author author1
    <dbl>  <dbl>   <dbl>
 1  101.     2.      2.
 2  101.     2.      4.
 3  101.     2.      8.
 4  101.     2.     16.
 5  101.     4.      2.
 6  101.     4.      4.
 7  101.     4.      8.
 8  101.     4.     16.
 9  101.     8.      2.
10  101.     8.      4.
11  101.     8.      8.
12  101.     8.     16.
13  101.    16.      2.
14  101.    16.      4.
15  101.    16.      8.
16  101.    16.     16.
17  301.    32.     32.
18  301.    32.     64.
19  301.    64.     32.
20  301.    64.     64.

I need help for two things:

  1. How do I remove swapped combinations (e.g. row 2 and 5)?
  2. For each combination, I would like to have attributes:
    • start = earliest post for topic (use mutate, min = min(time))
    • duration of topic (time for last post on topic minus time for first post on topic, use mutate duration = max(time) - min(time))
    • count of posts (use summarize)?
  • What exactly do you want to get? Group by topic, then generate every distinct author1-author2 combination? even where author1==author2? – smci May 19 '18 at 1:33
  • I don't understand the second question "2. For each combination, I would like to have attributes...", did you want to generate those new columns in a second (summary) table, or in the same combination expansion table? But anyway, you're supposed to show us your code attempts, or at very minimum an example of the output. – smci May 19 '18 at 1:34
  • Btw, there's no such thing as "swapped combinations", they're "permutations" (because they're order-dependent). Functions named expand/expand.grid... and SQL joins generally give you permutations, not combinations. – smci May 19 '18 at 2:49
  • Ok can you accept some answer on this? The big-O runtime(/memory) performance of combn(x, m=2) for long x of length (say) 1000 or more is a separate question, please ask it. I suspect the limiting factor is your memory usage not CPU, and as I mentioned the solution is either use file-backed object, or split your big groupby(datetime) into as many disjoint chunks of datetime as you need. There's no reason to keep the entire result in memory at the same time. But anyway those are separate questions. – smci May 21 '18 at 0:12
  • As to memory usage, you're storing your datetime as a string (120 bytes); POSIXct would occupy something like ~520 bytes and POSIXlt ~1816 bytes, but object.size(as.integer(as.POSIXct("2014-08-16 20:20:11"))) is only 48 bytes (seconds since epoch). – smci May 21 '18 at 0:31
0

You don't necessarily want to use tidyr::expand() (it seems to be a left-join) to try to generate combinations, you seem to be getting all the permutations instead: In particular, the unwanted self-self combinations, and combinations with author1,author2 swapped (i.e. permutations). Similarly the builtin base::expand.grid() does permutations not combinations.

Use the builtin combn() (it's in utils::combn()).

There are many existing questions on dplyr groupby combn, you can find them with a simple search.

Been trying to post working code but I don't know tidyr so well, everything I tried didn't work or syntax error. expand wants a dataframe then it references variables. So %>% expand(author, author) again gives you all permutations, not just combinations. %>% complete(...) seems useless. I think you need the tidyr syntax to call combn on author at that grouping level. That might need to be a nested subcall for each grouping level, with whatever tidyr's equivalent of do.call is.

  • Yes, I did experience this. I will give this a bash! Thank you. – aterhorst May 19 '18 at 1:57
  • Differentiating between permutations and combinations is helpful. My only issue is with combn is that I need to abandon my piped approach (I like the tidyverse method) and run a loop to do unique combinations by group. The combn function is not super intuitive for a beginner like me. – aterhorst May 19 '18 at 2:23
  • Bearing in mind you want combn not expand/expand.grid, see duplicates like stackoverflow.com/questions/42910553/… for hacked-up tidyr approach. As i say you might have to generate the dataframe/list of author-author combinations as a nested subcall. – smci May 19 '18 at 2:47
  • Another way is to suck the result into igraph and simplify undirected graph (remove duplicate edges). It is a hack. – aterhorst May 19 '18 at 2:54
  • 1
    My piped command transposed it. I have 6000 records with 1000 authors across 400 discussions (topic). My script produces 400 undirected networks (one for each topic). This amounts to 80 million edges! – aterhorst May 20 '18 at 11:10
0

Final solution:

time <- df %>% group_by(topic) %>% mutate(posts = n(), start = min(time), duration = (max(time) - min(time))/3600) %>% distinct(topic,start,duration)
combo <- df %>% group_by(topic) %>% do(data.frame(t(combn(.$author,2))))
edges <- right_join(combo, time)
edges

# A tibble: 13 x 5
# Groups:   topic [?]
   topic    X1    X2 start               duration         
   <dbl> <dbl> <dbl> <dttm>              <time>           
 1  101.    2.    4. 2014-08-16 20:20:11 13.8058333333333 
 2  101.    2.    8. 2014-08-16 20:20:11 13.8058333333333 
 3  101.    2.   16. 2014-08-16 20:20:11 13.8058333333333 
 4  101.    4.    8. 2014-08-16 20:20:11 13.8058333333333 
 5  101.    4.   16. 2014-08-16 20:20:11 13.8058333333333 
 6  101.    8.   16. 2014-08-16 20:20:11 13.8058333333333 
 7  301.   32.   64. 2014-08-20 22:23:01 0.667222222222222
 8  501.  128.  256. 2014-08-25 17:05:01 6.91611111111111 
 9  501.  128.  512. 2014-08-25 17:05:01 6.91611111111111 
10  501.  128. 1024. 2014-08-25 17:05:01 6.91611111111111 
11  501.  256.  512. 2014-08-25 17:05:01 6.91611111111111 
12  501.  256. 1024. 2014-08-25 17:05:01 6.91611111111111 
13  501.  512. 1024. 2014-08-25 17:05:01 6.91611111111111
0

I partially solved my problem this way:

test <- df %>% group_by(topic) %>%
            mutate(posts=n(), start=min(time), duration=(max(time)-min(time))/3600) %>%
            expand(nesting(author), author, posts, start, duration) %>% filter(author != author1)
test
# A tibble: 36 x 6
# Groups:   topic [3]
   topic author author1 posts start               duration
   <dbl>  <dbl>   <dbl> <int> <dttm>                 <dbl>
 2  101.     2.      4.     4 2014-08-16 20:20:11     13.8
 3  101.     2.      8.     4 2014-08-16 20:20:11     13.8
 4  101.     2.     16.     4 2014-08-16 20:20:11     13.8
 5  101.     4.      2.     4 2014-08-16 20:20:11     13.8
 7  101.     4.      8.     4 2014-08-16 20:20:11     13.8
 8  101.     4.     16.     4 2014-08-16 20:20:11     13.8
 9  101.     8.      2.     4 2014-08-16 20:20:11     13.8
10  101.     8.      4.     4 2014-08-16 20:20:11     13.8
# ... with 26 more rows

Still need to figure out swapped combinations!

0

I discovered the iterpc package. It is fast and does combinations. Here is my example code:

df <- data.frame(author_id = c(2,4,8,16,32,16,128,256,512,8),
             topic_id = c(101,101,101,101,301,301,501,501,501,501),
             time = as.POSIXct(c("2014-08-16 20:20:11", "2014-08-16 21:10:00", "2014-08-17 06:30:10",
                                 "2014-08-17 10:08:32", "2014-08-20 22:23:01","2014-08-20 23:03:03",
                                 "2014-08-25 17:05:01", "2014-08-25 19:15:10",  "2014-08-25 20:07:11",
                                 "2014-08-25 23:59:59")))

First I create a unique list of nodes (graph vertices)

node <- df %>% distinct(author_id, vendor) %>% rename(id = author_id) 

Then I create my edge list using iterpc as follows:

library(iterpc)
edge <- df %>% group_by(topic_id) %>% do(data.frame(getall(iterpc(table(.$author_id), 2, replace =TRUE)))) %>%
 filter(X1 != X2) %>% rename(from = X1, to = X2) %>% select(to, from, topic_id)

That done I build my graph:

library(igraph)
test_net <- graph_from_data_frame(d = edge, directed = F, vertices = node)
plot(test_net)

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