I have written a class multi_array which is sort of an extension of std::array to multiple dimensions.

template <typename T, std::size_t... N>
class multi_array {
    template <std::size_t... I, typename... Idx>
    constexpr std::size_t linearized_index(meta::index_sequence<I...>,
                                           Idx... idx) const {
        std::size_t index = 0;
        using unpack = std::size_t[];
        (void)unpack{0UL,
                     ((void)(index = (index + unpack{std::size_t(idx)...}[I]) *
                                     meta::pack_element<I + 1, N...>::value),
                      0UL)...};
        return index + unpack{std::size_t(idx)...}[sizeof...(idx) - 1];
    }

    // Storage
    T m_data[meta::product<N...>::value];

    //...
};

I have managed to get constexpr element access but only in C++14. The problem is the function linearized_index. It computes the linearized index at compile-time. In order to do so it reduces the tuple of indices and the tuple of dimension in a certain manner. For this reduction I need a local variable inside the function but this is not allowed in C++11. My environment does not permit the usage of C++14. Can I somehow rewrite this function to work with C++11?

I have prepared a full (not so minimal) example which compiles in C++14.

#include <cstddef> // std::size_t

namespace meta {

// product

template <std::size_t...>
struct product;

template <std::size_t head, std::size_t... dim>
struct product<head, dim...> {
    static constexpr std::size_t const value = head * product<dim...>::value;
};

template <>
struct product<> {
    static constexpr std::size_t const value = 1;
};

// pack_element

template <std::size_t index, std::size_t head, std::size_t... pack>
struct pack_element {
    static_assert(index < sizeof...(pack) + 1, "index out of bounds");
    static constexpr std::size_t const value =
        pack_element<index - 1, pack...>::value;
};

template <std::size_t head, std::size_t... pack>
struct pack_element<0, head, pack...> {
    static constexpr std::size_t const value = head;
};

// index_sequence

// https://stackoverflow.com/a/24481400
template <std::size_t... I>
struct index_sequence {};

template <std::size_t N, std::size_t... I>
struct make_index_sequence : public make_index_sequence<N - 1, N - 1, I...> {};

template <std::size_t... I>
struct make_index_sequence<0, I...> : public index_sequence<I...> {};

} // namespace meta

template <typename T, std::size_t... N>
class multi_array {
    template <std::size_t... I, typename... Idx>
    constexpr std::size_t linearized_index(meta::index_sequence<I...>,
                                           Idx... idx) const {
        std::size_t index = 0;
        using unpack = std::size_t[];
        (void)unpack{0UL,
                     ((void)(index = (index + unpack{std::size_t(idx)...}[I]) *
                                     meta::pack_element<I + 1, N...>::value),
                      0UL)...};
        return index + unpack{std::size_t(idx)...}[sizeof...(idx) - 1];
    }

    // Storage
    T m_data[meta::product<N...>::value];

public:
    constexpr multi_array() {}

    template <typename... U>
    constexpr multi_array(U... data) : m_data{T(data)...} {}

    template <typename... Idx>
    constexpr T operator()(Idx... idx) const noexcept {
        std::size_t index = linearized_index(
            meta::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(idx) - 1>{}, idx...);
        return m_data[index];
    }
};

int main() {
    constexpr multi_array<double, 2, 2> const b = {0, 0, 0, 1};
    static_assert(b(1, 1) == 1, "!");
}

Live on Wandbox (C++14) and Live on Wandbox (C++11)

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The crucial part of your use of index is an iterative loop:

index = (index*a) + b

In your own C++14 solution, a trick of unpacking parameter pack is used. In C++11, you can formulate it in a recursive constexpr function:

struct mypair {
    size_t a;
    size_t b;
};

constexpr std::size_t foo(std::size_t init) {
    return init;
}

template<class... Pair>
constexpr std::size_t foo(std::size_t init, mypair p0, Pair... ps) {
    return foo((init+p0.a)*p0.b, ps...);
}

We use mypair instead of std::pair because the constructor of std::pair in C++11 is not constexpr. Then your iterative loop can be literally translated to:

    template <std::size_t... I, typename... Idx>
    constexpr std::size_t linearized_index(meta::index_sequence<I...>,
                                           Idx... idx) const {
        using unpack = std::size_t[];
        return foo(0, mypair{unpack{std::size_t(idx)...}[I], meta::pack_element<I+1, N...>::value}...) + unpack{std::size_t(idx)...}[sizeof...(idx) - 1];
    }

Live Demo

If in operator(), instead of calling

 std::size_t index = linearized_index(
    meta::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(idx) - 1>{}, idx...);

you call

 std::size_t index = linearized_index<N...>(idx...);

or better (to make operator() constexpr)

 return m_data[linearized_index<N...>(idx...)];

you can rewrite linearized_index() recursively as follows

  // ground case
  template <std::size_t>
  constexpr std::size_t linearized_index (std::size_t idx0) const
   { return idx0; }

  // recursive case
  template <std::size_t, std::size_t... Is, typename... Idx>
  constexpr std::size_t linearized_index (std::size_t idx0,
                                          Idx ... idxs) const
   { return idx0 * meta::product<Is...>::value
        + linearized_index<Is...>(idxs...); }

If you prefer, the ground case can be written as follows

  template <typename = void>
  constexpr std::size_t linearized_index () const
   { return 0; }

Observe that you don't need meta::index_sequence, meta::make_index_sequence or meta::pack_element anymore.

The following is a full C++11 compiling example

#include <cstddef> // std::size_t

namespace meta
 {
   template <std::size_t...>
    struct product;

   template <std::size_t head, std::size_t... dim>
   struct product<head, dim...>
    { static constexpr std::size_t const value
         = head * product<dim...>::value; };

   template <>
   struct product<>
    { static constexpr std::size_t const value = 1; };

} // namespace meta

template <typename T, std::size_t... N>
class multi_array
 {
   private:
      // ground case
      template <std::size_t>
      constexpr std::size_t linearized_index (std::size_t idx0) const
       { return idx0; }

      // alternative ground case
      //template <typename = void>
      //constexpr std::size_t linearized_index () const
      // { return 0; }

      // recursive case
      template <std::size_t, std::size_t... Is, typename... Idx>
      constexpr std::size_t linearized_index (std::size_t idx0,
                                              Idx ... idxs) const
       { return idx0 * meta::product<Is...>::value
            + linearized_index<Is...>(idxs...); }

      // Storage
      T m_data[meta::product<N...>::value];

   public:
      constexpr multi_array()
       { }

      template <typename ... U>
      constexpr multi_array(U ... data) : m_data{T(data)...}
       { }

      template <typename... Idx>
      constexpr T operator() (Idx... idx) const noexcept
       { return m_data[linearized_index<N...>(idx...)]; }
 };

int main()
 {
   constexpr multi_array<double, 2, 2> const b = {0, 0, 0, 1};

   static_assert( b(1, 1) == 1, "!" );

   constexpr multi_array<double, 4, 3, 2> const c
    { 0, 0,   0, 0,   0, 0,
      0, 0,   0, 0,   0, 0,
      0, 0,   2, 0,   0, 0,
      0, 0,   0, 0,   0, 1};

   static_assert( c(3, 2, 1) == 1, "!" );
   static_assert( c(2, 1, 0) == 2, "!" );
 }

Bonus suggestion: if you add the following constexpr functions (static methods inside multi_array?)

  constexpr static std::size_t prod ()
   { return 1U; }

  template <typename ... Args>
  constexpr static std::size_t prod (std::size_t v, Args ... vs)
   { return v * prod(vs...); }

you can delete the struct product calling

  // Storage
  T m_data[prod(N...)];

and

  // recursive case
  template <std::size_t, std::size_t... Is, typename... Idx>
  constexpr std::size_t linearized_index (std::size_t idx0,
                                          Idx ... idxs) const
   { return idx0 * prod(Is...) + linearized_index<Is...>(idxs...); }
  • This is a very nice answer as well and I'll reward it with a small bounty soon. – Henri Menke May 19 at 23:03
  • BTW, I cannot make operator() constexpr in C++11 because there constexpr implies const (which is very annoying). – Henri Menke May 20 at 0:01
  • @HenriMenke - Maybe two versions, in the operator[]/at() tradition? template <typename... Idx> constexpr T const & operator() (Idx... idx) const { return m_data[linearized_index<N...>(idx...)]; } template <typename... Idx> T & operator() (Idx... idx) { return m_data[linearized_index<N...>(idx...)]; } ? – max66 May 20 at 1:48

Straightforward approach avoiding arrays:

#include <tuple>
#include <type_traits>
#include <cstddef>

template
<
    typename          x_IndexTypesTuple
,   ::std::size_t ... x_dimension
> class
t_MultiIndexImpl;

template
<
    typename          x_LeadingIndex
,   typename ...      x_Index
,   ::std::size_t     x_leadding_dimension
,   ::std::size_t ... x_dimension
> class
t_MultiIndexImpl
<
    ::std::tuple<x_LeadingIndex, x_Index ...>, x_leadding_dimension, x_dimension ...
> final
{
    static_assert
    (
        ::std::is_same<::std::size_t, x_LeadingIndex>::value
    ,   "index type must be ::std::size_t"
    );

    public: static constexpr auto
    Op
    (
        ::std::size_t const  stride_size
    ,   x_LeadingIndex const leading_index
    ,   x_Index const ...    index
    ) -> ::std::size_t
    {
        return stride_size * leading_index
            + t_MultiIndexImpl<::std::tuple<x_Index ...>, x_dimension ...>::Op
            (
                stride_size * x_leadding_dimension, index ...
            );
    }
};

template<> class
t_MultiIndexImpl<::std::tuple<>> final
{
    public: static constexpr auto
    Op(::std::size_t const /*stride_size*/) -> ::std::size_t
    {
        return ::std::size_t{0};
    }
};

template<::std::size_t ... x_dimension, typename ... x_Index> inline constexpr auto
Caclculate_MultiIndex(x_Index const ... index) -> ::std::size_t
{
    static_assert
    (
        sizeof...(x_dimension) == sizeof...(x_Index)
    ,   "arguments count must match dimensions count"
    );
    return t_MultiIndexImpl<::std::tuple<x_Index ...>, x_dimension ...>::Op(::std::size_t{1}, index ...);
}

online compiler | godbolt

  • Eventually I want to use multi_array within CUDA code, so not std::tuple :( But of course +1 for your nice solution! – Henri Menke May 19 at 10:49
  • 1
    @HenriMenke Well, tuple here is used only to pack index types so technically it can be replaced with any random class template with parameter pack or removed completely. – VTT May 19 at 10:53
  • Do you always prefix std with ::? Had you ever have any problem with simply std::something? – YSC May 23 at 12:35
  • @YSC I prefix all the names from global namespace with ::. And yes, I do get problems with code not following the same convention on regular basis. I had some issues with std:: not being ::std:: as well: case 1 - library defines a nested std namespace with stuff implementing future standard (for backporting), case 2 - enum std{ vector, list ... (used for serialization of standard containers). So I don't see any reason to make an exception for std namespace and to not prefix it with ::. – VTT May 23 at 12:55
  • @VTT thank you I'll think of it – YSC May 23 at 12:57

I have managed to get a C++11 compatible solution by rewriting the function to evaluate recursively. This not only works but is also a lot nicer to read:

template <typename... Idx>
constexpr std::size_t linearized_index(std::size_t n, Idx... idx) const {
    using unpack = std::size_t[];
    return unpack{std::size_t(idx)...}[n] +
           (n == 0 ? 0
                   : unpack{std::size_t(N)...}[n] *
                         linearized_index(n - 1, idx...));
}

I have found another solution using template specializations which avoids the recursive function call and replaces it with recursive instantiation.

namespace meta {

template <size_t n, size_t... N>
struct linearized_index {
    template <typename... Idx>
    constexpr std::size_t operator()(Idx... idx) const {
        using unpack = std::size_t[];
        return unpack{std::size_t(idx)...}[n] +
               unpack{std::size_t(N)...}[n] *
                   linearized_index<n - 1, N...>{}(idx...);
    }
};

template <size_t... N>
struct linearized_index<0, N...> {
    template <typename... Idx>
    constexpr std::size_t operator()(Idx... idx) const {
        using unpack = std::size_t[];
        return unpack{std::size_t(idx)...}[0];
    }
};

} // namespace meta

and the multi_array call operator

template <typename... Idx>
constexpr T operator()(Idx... idx) const noexcept {
    return m_data[meta::linearized_index<sizeof...(idx) - 1, N...>{}(
        idx...)];
}

This produces perfect assembly: https://godbolt.org/g/8LPkBZ

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.