6

I need to allocate large blocks of memory (to be used by my custom allocator) that fall within the first 32GB of virtual address space.

I imagine that if I needed, say, 1MB blocks, I could iterate using mmap and MAP_FIXED_NOREPLACE (or VirtualAlloc) from low addresses onwards in increments of, say, 1MB, until the call succeeds. Continue from the last successful block for the next one.

This sounds clumsy, but at least it will be somewhat robust against OS address space layout changes, and ASLR algorithm changes. From my understanding of current OS layouts, there should be plenty of memory available in the first 32GB this way, but maybe I am missing something?

Is there anything in Windows, Linux, OS X, iOS or Android that would defeat this scheme? Is there a better way?

Just in case you're wondering, this is for the implementation of a VM for a programming language where fitting all pointers in a 32-bit value on a 64-bit system could give huge memory usage advantages and even speed gains. Since all objects are at least 8-byte aligned, the lower 3 bits can be shifted out, expanding the pointer range from 4GB to 32GB.

  • MS-Window you can query the page table, this might take some of the trial and error out of VirtualAlloc see: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… – Richard Critten May 19 '18 at 20:59
  • Does the language have an equivalent of char and char *? If so, are all char objects also 8-byte aligned? – Angew May 19 '18 at 21:01
  • Would you be open to an alternative solution that avoids the restriction on virtual addresses? – 1201ProgramAlarm May 19 '18 at 21:12
  • @RichardCritten: Thanks! That could speed it up. – Aardappel May 20 '18 at 1:10
  • @Angew: it has strings that are 8-byte aligned, no naked char * sub-strings – Aardappel May 20 '18 at 1:11
8
+100

for restrict allocated memory range in windows we can use NtAllocateVirtualMemory function - this api is avaible for use in both user and kernel mode. in user mode it exported by ntdll.dll (use ntdll.lib or ntdllp.lib from wdk). in this api exist parameter - ZeroBits - The number of high-order address bits that must be zero in the base address of the section view. but in msdn link next words about ZeroBits is incorrect. correct is:

ZeroBits

Supplies the number of high order address bits that must be zero in the base address of the section view. The value of this argument must be less than or equal to the maximum number of zero bits and is only used when memory management determines where to allocate the view (i.e. when BaseAddress is null).

If ZeroBits is zero, then no zero bit constraints are applied.

If ZeroBits is greater than 0 and less than 32, then it is the number of leading zero bits from bit 31. Bits 63:32 are also required to be zero. This retains compatibility with 32-bit systems. If ZeroBits is greater than 32, then it is considered as a mask and then number of leading zero are counted out in the mask. This then becomes the zero bits argument.

so really we can use ZeroBits as mask - this is most power usage. but can be use and as zero bit count from 31 bit (in this case 63-32 bits will be always equal to 0). because allocation granularity (currently 64kb - 0x10000) - low 16 bits is always 0. so valid value for ZeroBits in bits-number mode - from 1 to 15 (=31-16). for better understand how this parameter work - look for example code. for better demo effect i will be use

MEM_TOP_DOWN

The specified region should be created at the highest virtual address possible based on ZeroBits.

PVOID BaseAddress;
ULONG_PTR ZeroBits;
SIZE_T RegionSize = 1;
NTSTATUS status;

for (ZeroBits = 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF;;)
{
    if (0 <= (status = NtAllocateVirtualMemory(NtCurrentProcess(), &(BaseAddress = 0), 
        ZeroBits, &RegionSize, MEM_RESERVE|MEM_TOP_DOWN, PAGE_NOACCESS)))
    {
        DbgPrint("%p:%p\n", ZeroBits, BaseAddress);
        NtFreeVirtualMemory(NtCurrentProcess(), &BaseAddress, &RegionSize, MEM_RELEASE);

        ZeroBits >>= 1;
    }
    else
    {
        DbgPrint("%x\n", status);
        break;
    }
}

for(ZeroBits = 0;;) 
{
    if (0 <= (status = NtAllocateVirtualMemory(NtCurrentProcess(), &(BaseAddress = 0), 
        ZeroBits, &RegionSize, MEM_RESERVE|MEM_TOP_DOWN, PAGE_NOACCESS)))
    {
        DbgPrint("%x:%p\n", ZeroBits++, BaseAddress);
        NtFreeVirtualMemory(NtCurrentProcess(), &BaseAddress, &RegionSize, MEM_RELEASE);
    }
    else
    {
        DbgPrint("%x\n", status);
        break;
    }
}

and output:

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
3FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
1FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
0FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
07FFFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
03FFFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
01FFFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
00FFFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
007FFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
003FFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
001FFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
000FFFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
0007FFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
0003FFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
0001FFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
0000FFFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
00007FFFFFFFFFFF:00007FF735B40000
00003FFFFFFFFFFF:00003FFFFFFF0000
00001FFFFFFFFFFF:00001FFFFFFF0000
00000FFFFFFFFFFF:00000FFFFFFF0000
000007FFFFFFFFFF:000007FFFFFF0000
000003FFFFFFFFFF:000003FFFFFF0000
000001FFFFFFFFFF:000001FFFFFF0000
000000FFFFFFFFFF:000000FFFFFF0000
0000007FFFFFFFFF:0000007FFFFF0000
0000003FFFFFFFFF:0000003FFFFF0000
0000001FFFFFFFFF:0000001FFFFF0000
0000000FFFFFFFFF:0000000FFFFF0000
00000007FFFFFFFF:00000007FFFF0000
00000003FFFFFFFF:00000003FFFF0000
00000001FFFFFFFF:00000001FFFF0000
00000000FFFFFFFF:00000000FFFF0000
000000007FFFFFFF:000000007FFF0000
000000003FFFFFFF:000000003FFF0000
000000001FFFFFFF:000000001FFF0000
000000000FFFFFFF:000000000FFF0000
0000000007FFFFFF:0000000007FF0000
0000000003FFFFFF:0000000003FF0000
0000000001FFFFFF:0000000001FF0000
0000000000FFFFFF:0000000000FF0000
00000000007FFFFF:00000000007F0000
00000000003FFFFF:00000000003F0000
00000000001FFFFF:00000000001F0000
00000000000FFFFF:00000000000F0000
000000000007FFFF:0000000000070000
000000000003FFFF:0000000000030000
000000000001FFFF:0000000000010000
c0000017
0:00007FF735B40000
1:000000007FFF0000
2:000000003FFF0000
3:000000001FFF0000
4:000000000FFF0000
5:0000000007FF0000
6:0000000003FF0000
7:0000000001FF0000
8:0000000000FF0000
9:00000000007F0000
a:00000000003F0000
b:00000000001F0000
c:00000000000F0000
d:0000000000070000
e:0000000000030000
f:0000000000010000
c0000017

so if we say want restrict memory allocation to 32Gb(0x800000000) - we can use ZeroBits = 0x800000000 - 1:

NtAllocateVirtualMemory(NtCurrentProcess(), &(BaseAddress = 0), 
            0x800000000 - 1, &RegionSize, MEM_RESERVE|MEM_TOP_DOWN, PAGE_NOACCESS)

as result memory will be allocated in range [0, 7FFFFFFFF] (actually [0, 7FFFF0000] because allocation granularity low 16 bits of address always is 0)


than you can create heap by RtlCreateHeap on allocated region range and allocate memory from this heap (note - this is also user mode api - use ntdll[p].lib for linker input)

PVOID BaseAddress = 0;
SIZE_T RegionSize = 0x10000000;// reserve 256Mb
if (0 <= NtAllocateVirtualMemory(NtCurrentProcess(), &BaseAddress, 
    0x800000000 - 1, &RegionSize, MEM_RESERVE, PAGE_READWRITE))
{
    if (PVOID hHeap = RtlCreateHeap(0, BaseAddress, RegionSize, 0, 0, 0))
    {
        HeapAlloc(hHeap, 0, <somesize>);
        RtlDestroyHeap(hHeap);
    }

    VirtualFree(BaseAddress, 0, MEM_RELEASE);
}
  • Thanks, this is a fantastic answer for the Windows case that does exactly what I want. I appreciate the example code. Was also hoping for some hints on how to accomplish the same on other OS-es though. – Aardappel May 27 '18 at 19:08
  • @Aardappel - unfortunately my answer is only for windows case. i have no any knowledge about another os. – RbMm May 27 '18 at 20:16
  • ok, I'll accept your answer in a few days unless someone manages to do better. – Aardappel May 27 '18 at 23:28

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