3

I have a simple web-app with angular on client-side and asp.net core web-api on server-side. I use InMemoryDatabase

services.AddDbContext<ItemsContext>(options => options.UseInMemoryDatabase("ItemsDB"));

to store data for the simplisity of the development. But I've encountered an issue with that. I have one controller on web-api to response for users' requests:

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class ItemsController : Controller
{
    private readonly IApiService apiService;

    public ItemsController(IApiService apiService)//using DI from Startup.cs
    {
       this.apiService = apiService;
    }

    [HttpPost, Route("addItem")]
    public async Task<Response> Add([FromBody]Item item)
    {
        return await apiService.Add(item);
    }

    [HttpDelete("{id}")]
    public async Task<Response> Delete(int id)
    {
        return await apiService.Delete(id);
    }

    [HttpPut]
    public async Task<Response> Put([FromBody]Item item)
    {
         return await apiService.Put(item);
    }
}

and the following Startup.cs configurations:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddMvc();
    services.AddDbContext<ItemsContext>(options => options.UseInMemoryDatabase("ItemsDB"));
    services.AddSingleton<IUnitOfWork, UnitOfWork>(provider => {
        var context = services.BuildServiceProvider().GetService<ItemsContext>();
        return new UnitOfWork(context);
    });
    services.AddSingleton<IApiService, ApiService>(provider => {
        return new ApiService(services);
    });
}

The problem is, that when I add new item, everything goes just fine...but then I post another request to delete this item it may show there there is no such an item at all or sometimes it may delete it...so in other words, the database exists and then disappears and I'm not sure when. Here is some additional code refering to the above

public class ApiService: IApiService
{
    private readonly IUnitOfWork database;
    private readonly IServiceProvider provider;

    public ApiService(IServiceCollection serviceCollection)
    {
        provider = serviceCollection.BuildServiceProvider();
    }

    public IUnitOfWork Database 
    { 
        get 
        {
            return provider.GetService<IUnitOfWork>();
        }
    }

    public async Task<Response> Add(Item item)
    {
        Database.Items.Add(item);
        await Database.SaveAsync();

        var id = Database.Items.LastItem().Id;
        return new Response() { Result = true, ItemId = id };
    }

    public async Task<Response> Delete(int id)
    {
        var item = await db.Items.Find(id);
        Database.Items.Remove(item);
        await Database.SaveAsync();

        return new Response() { Result = true };
    }

    public async Task<Response> Put(Item item)
    {
        Database.Items.Update(item);
        await Database.SaveAsync();
        return new Response() { Result = true };
    }
}

Update: UnitOfWork Implementation:

 public class UnitOfWork: IUnitOfWork
{
    private readonly DbContext context;
    private IRepository<Item> itemsRepository;

    public UnitOfWork(DbContext dbContext)
    {
        context = dbContext;
    }

    public IRepository<Item> Items
    {
        get
        {
            return itemsRepository ?? (itemsRepository = new Repository<Item>(context));
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        context.Dispose();
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public async Task SaveAsync()
    {
        await context.SaveChangesAsync();
    }
}
5
  • Two things: one, you didn't post your IUnitOfWork implementation. Second, that pattern (UoW + Repository) is a waste in Entity Framework Core, it's already implemented and you win nothing by re-implementing it. Even less with that service-locator anti-pattern you are using in that Repository – Camilo Terevinto May 21 '18 at 21:54
  • I just noticed that you are implementing async Task methods without awaiting anything.. i.e in your Add(Item item) function – jmesolomon May 21 '18 at 21:57
  • @jmesolomon That isn't a problem if Database.Save() calls context.SaveChanges() – Camilo Terevinto May 21 '18 at 21:58
  • Corrections-there is Database.SaveAsync(); – Arthur Bardakov May 21 '18 at 21:59
  • ...posted IUnitOfWork implemetation – Arthur Bardakov May 21 '18 at 22:06
9

Your code has multiple serious problems, let's go through them.

  1. services.AddDbContext adds a Scoped service, meaning that instances will be created and disposed on each request. services.AddSingleton adds a Singleton service, so only a single instance will ever be created. You cannot add a scoped service to a singleton one, because the reference the singleton service uses will be disposed and you will end up with a disposed context.
  2. This code:

    return provider.GetService<IUnitOfWork>();
    

    represents the service locator anti-pattern. As you can guess, an anti-pattern is something you want to avoid. I also don't know why you would want a service to build the entire DI container nor why you would want a service to have the responsibility of getting the dependencies it needs itself.

  3. This part here is where your question actually comes from:

    Database.SaveAsync();
    

    You are calling an asynchronous function and not awaiting for it to finish. The task may finish or not, it may throw an error or not, you will never know what happened.

The best thing is that all of these could be avoided if people stopped attempting to create a Unit of Work + Repository pattern over yet another Unit of Work and Repository. Entity Framework Core already implements these:

DbContext => Unit of Work
DbSet => Repository (generic)

Why do you want yet another abstraction? Will you really ever throw away EF Core from the project to justify the maintenance cost of your code?

The entire question code could have just been this:

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class ItemsController : Controller
{
    private readonly YourContext _context;

    public ItemsController(YourContext context)
    {
       _context = context;
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public async Task<IActionResult> Add([FromBody]Item item)
    {
        context.Items.Add(item);
        await context.SaveChangesAsync();

        return Ok(item.Id);
    }

    [HttpDelete("{id}")]
    public async Task<IActionResult> Delete(int id)
    {
        context.Items.Remove(item);
        await context.SaveChangesAsync();

        return Ok();
    }

    [HttpPut]
    public async Task<IActionResult> Put([FromBody]Item item)
    {
        context.Items.Update(item);
        await context.SaveChangesAsync();

        return Ok();
    }
}
4
  • Great answer Camilo. This is a perfect example of the abstraction madness that comes with EF + Unit of Work + Repository. – Brad May 21 '18 at 23:49
  • @Brad thanks and thanks for the edit, that was a mind-bug – Camilo Terevinto May 21 '18 at 23:53
  • Thanks a lot!! It's been very helpful. I didn't knwo that adding services.AddDbContext adds a scoped service. That was the problem. Concerning Database.SaveAsync() I awaited the result in my code, it was just a type here. – Arthur Bardakov May 22 '18 at 7:35
  • well, I created the UofW in order to share the DbContext among the Repositories... There are some issues about it? I would like to know. – Andre Jun 14 '18 at 14:33

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