With the code sample below:

arabic <-" السعودية"

png("arabic.png", 500, 500, res = 72)
plot(1, 1, type ="n"); text(1,1, arabic, cex = 4)
dev.off()

sessionInfo()

On one machine with RServer Studio it works perfectly ( think - I can't read Arabic...):

enter image description here

Whereas on a second machine with RStudio Server (so also Linux) it doesn't: enter image description here

Here is the sessionInfo of the first, working machine:

R version 3.3.3 (2017-03-06)
Platform: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu (64-bit)
Running under: Debian GNU/Linux 9 (stretch)

locale:
 [1] LC_CTYPE=en_NZ.UTF-8       LC_NUMERIC=C               LC_TIME=en_NZ.UTF-8        LC_COLLATE=en_NZ.UTF-8    
 [5] LC_MONETARY=en_NZ.UTF-8    LC_MESSAGES=en_NZ.UTF-8    LC_PAPER=en_NZ.UTF-8       LC_NAME=C                 
 [9] LC_ADDRESS=C               LC_TELEPHONE=C             LC_MEASUREMENT=en_NZ.UTF-8 LC_IDENTIFICATION=C       

attached base packages:
[1] stats     graphics  grDevices utils     datasets  methods   base     

loaded via a namespace (and not attached):
[1] tools_3.3.3

and of the second, not working:

R version 3.4.4 (2018-03-15)
Platform: x86_64-redhat-linux-gnu (64-bit)
Running under: Amazon Linux 2 (2017.12) LTS Release Candidate

Matrix products: default
BLAS/LAPACK: /usr/lib64/R/lib/libRblas.so

locale:
 [1] LC_CTYPE=en_US.UTF-8       LC_NUMERIC=C               LC_TIME=en_US.UTF-8        LC_COLLATE=en_US.UTF-8    
 [5] LC_MONETARY=en_US.UTF-8    LC_MESSAGES=en_US.UTF-8    LC_PAPER=en_US.UTF-8       LC_NAME=C                 
 [9] LC_ADDRESS=C               LC_TELEPHONE=C             LC_MEASUREMENT=en_US.UTF-8 LC_IDENTIFICATION=C       

attached base packages:
[1] stats     graphics  grDevices utils     datasets  methods   base     

loaded via a namespace (and not attached):
[1] compiler_3.4.4 tools_3.4.4    yaml_2.1.19 

I should also say I have tried this code on Windows machines with R 3.5 and 3.4.2 and it works fine, so it seems unlikely that it is the R version that is the factor, but something about the underlying machines. I'm guessing that the non-working machine has some kind of UTF-8 support missing and if I knew what it was I could install it, but I don't.

Any ideas?

Update with wider range of characters

To add to the mystery, my non-performing system works with some types of characters (basically, European ones) but not others. To illustrate:

misc <- "pučina, Māori ¡Qué tranza o qué!"
chinese <- "中華民族"
arabic <-" السعودية"
russian <- "катынь"

plot(1, type = "n")
text(1, 1.2, misc)
text(1,1, chinese)
text(1, 0.8, arabic)
text(1, 0.65, russian)

enter image description here

Chinese and Arabic don't work; Russian and a miscellany of European character sets do. Also, in case anyone is wondering:

> Encoding(arabic)
[1] "UTF-8"
> Encoding(misc)
[1] "UTF-8"
> Encoding(chinese)
[1] "UTF-8"
  • Its a locale thing, you can see both the system are having different locale settings. You can change them but do take a backup before doing so. Sys.setlocale to set the locale Sys.getlocale to fetch the locale – PKumar May 22 at 4:07
  • Thanks @PKumar. I tried Sys.setlocale("LC_ALL", "en_NZ.UTF-8") (to bring the Amazon machine into line with the one in New Zealand) and the problem still happens. Also it would seem odd if USA English in UTF-8 somehow can't handle non-latin characters by New Zealandish English can (but then, I'm often surprised by things). – Peter Ellis May 22 at 4:21
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So the answer to this turned out to be embarrassingly obvious. The default font used by R on the machine that wasn't working just doesn't have glyphs for Arabic and Chinese unicode characters, whereas the other machines did. The root cause of that is a mystery, but the solution is straightforward enough.

First I installed in the system a font family with a wide coverage of unicode characters. GNU FreeFont seemed a good choice. I wanted a single family that would cover many languages because of my end use case (where I won't know what language text is in in advance).

sudo yum install -y gnu-free-*-fonts
sudo R -e "extrafont::font_import(prompt = FALSE)"

I'm not sure if that second line to import the fonts into R is necessary but it doesn't do any harm and it does mean I can use extrafont::fonts() in R to see what is available.

Then back in R there's one line of additional code to set the font family with par(family="FreeSans").

misc <- "pučina, Māori ¡Qué tranza o qué!"
chinese <- "中華民族"
arabic <-" السعودية"
russian <- "катынь"


par(family="FreeSans")
plot(1, type = "n")
text(1, 1.2, misc)
text(1,1, chinese)
text(1, 0.8, arabic)
text(1, 0.65, russian)

enter image description here

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