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<div>manmadhan</div>

I need to know whether there is any possible way to find the width of each character in pixels based on the font , as i am using react app i need only javascript

the output should be like m=12px, n=24 pixel something like that I have tried to separate the text and try using the get bounds but empty space has some problem , any suggestion ?

i have already tried the following method , but it is giving me width of whole string rather than width of individual characters within the string Calculate text width with JavaScript

marked as duplicate by Liam, Tom Fenech, mplungjan html May 22 at 9:23

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  • No , That doesnt answer my question , i need width of seperate string rather than the whole div – madha kumar May 22 at 9:04
  • use margin padding 0 and set left -99999 and calculate the width by putting one char in div. you will get it. – Anirudha Gupta May 22 at 9:05
  • 2
    @Liam that would only work in monospace fonts – Luca Kiebel May 22 at 9:07
  • 1
    @Liam Because that would result in an average length, instead of the length of individual characters – Lorenz Merdian May 22 at 9:08
  • @Liam It doesnt work that way , the character A has different width and character I has different width – madha kumar May 22 at 9:08

The only way to do this really is to render the letter, measure it then delete it again.

You can do something like this to get all the letters when you open the page, though it would be better to only get the length when you need them, or even just not get get the lengths

let letterLength = {};
let letters = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g", "h", "i", "j", "k", "l", "m", "n", "o", "p", "q", "r", "s", "t", "u", "v", "w", "x", "y", "z", "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L", "M", "N", "O", "P", "Q", "R", "S", "T", "U", "V", "W", "X", "Y", "Z", "0", "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9"];

for (let letter of letters) {
  let span = document.createElement('span');
  span.append(document.createTextNode(letter));
  span.style.display = "inline-block";
  document.body.append(span);
  letterLength[letter] = span.offsetWidth + "px";
  span.remove();
}

let word = "manmadhan";

for (let i = 0; i < word.length; i++) {
  console.log(word[i] + ": " + letterLength[word[i]])
}

console.log(letterLength)

This is not ideal as it makes loading times slower so, as I say if you can, avoid doing this.

Caveat:

As Liam points out calculating the width of single characters can be miss leading the sum of the character widths may not equal the words total width. This is because of something called Kerning.

In typography, kerning is the process of adjusting the spacing between characters in a proportional font, usually to achieve a visually pleasing result. Kerning adjusts the space between individual letter forms, while tracking (letter-spacing) adjusts spacing uniformly over a range of characters. In a well-kerned font, the two-dimensional blank spaces between each pair of characters all have a visually similar area.

Below is an example that will compare the width of span with a whole word in vs the sum of its independent letters.

let letterLength = {};
let letters = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g", "h", "i", "j", "k", "l", "m", "n", "o", "p", "q", "r", "s", "t", "u", "v", "w", "x", "y", "z", "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L", "M", "N", "O", "P", "Q", "R", "S", "T", "U", "V", "W", "X", "Y", "Z", "0", "1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9"];

for (let letter of letters) {
  let span = document.createElement('span');
  span.append(document.createTextNode(letter));
  span.style.display = "inline-block";
  document.body.append(span);
  letterLength[letter] = span.offsetWidth;
  span.remove();
}


let word = document.querySelector(".word");
let totalLength = 0;
let actualLength = word.offsetWidth

for (let i = 0; i < word.innerHTML.length; i++) {
  totalLength += letterLength[word.innerHTML[i]];
}
console.log("span: "+actualLength+"px");
console.log("letters: "+totalLength+"px");
.word {
  display: inline-block;
}
<span class="word">Averages</span>

I hope this answers your question.

  • 1
    This doesn't tell you the size of the character in its position in the string, in AV and VV the V takes up a different amount of space in the string because kerning. It will give an estimate of the size of the character, but if you want an estimate why not just use the average?! – Liam May 22 at 9:37
  • 1
    Best of a bad situation I guess. I'll add a note to the answer expressing this 🙂 – Andrew Bone May 22 at 9:40
  • 1
    TBH I'm pretty sure this is an XY problem, I'd imaging the OP is trying to work break or something. Anyway, this is as good a solution as any, nothing is really going to work – Liam May 22 at 9:41

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