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We have an application where the main UI is coded in vb6. We also have multiple .net assemblies (winform and class libraries) built in vb.net (VS2015, targeting framework 4.5.2).

Can we utilize the winform dotnetbrowser in a .net assembly that is called via com interop from our vb6 main app?

The licensing articles instruct adding the license to the project as an embedded resourse - would this license be added to the .net assembly as an embedded resource? Or would it need to be added to the main app exe (vb6) as an embedded resource there?

  • I think you've really got 2 questions here. Consider posting the licensing one separately. – DaveInCaz May 23 '18 at 11:06
  • The short answer to the first question is probably "yes" - but what have you already tried? Are you having a specific problem? – DaveInCaz May 23 '18 at 11:07
  • @DaveInCaz - we're currently using the IE browser control, but it of course carries its own disadvantages (most significantly, it defaults to document mode 7). MS Edge browser (apparently) doesn't have a corresponding control, so the interest is in using dotnetbrowser to 'go modern'. Haven't tried it yet, wouldn't want to expend the effort if the answers were 'no'. So this post is arguably off topic for SO (no MCVE yet, etc), but teamdev appears to provide general (non pay) support through SO, they don't appear to have a Q&A forum on their site. – MarkL May 23 '18 at 13:41
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Can we utilize the winform dotnetbrowser in a .net assembly that is called via com interop from our vb6 main app?

Yes, this use-case is possible.

The licensing articles instruct adding the license to the project as an embedded resourse - would this license be added to the .net assembly as an embedded resource? Or would it need to be added to the main app exe (vb6) as an embedded resource there?

There are several ways to provide the licence to DotNetBrowser:

  • the most common and recommended way is to include the licence into the application .NET assembly as an Embedded Resource (it is usually done when performing a build)
  • the other common way is putting the licence file into the working directory of the application that loads and uses DotNetBrowser
  • at last, you can specify the full path to the licence file using the DOTNETBROWSER_LICENSE_PATH environment variable
  • Thanks for your reply! We'll probably be giving the evaluation a try soon. – MarkL May 23 '18 at 13:57

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