85

audio autoplay working in Mozilla, Microsoft edge and old google chrome as well but not in new google chrome. they have blocked the autoplay. is there any way to make it audio autoplay in google chrome?

  • 5
    The fact that Google did this is absurd. They literally just said "well no music for your game unless a user clicks Play Music". Unacceptable. So angry! – Hobbes Feb 6 '19 at 18:33
  • 2
    @Hobbes Agreed. At least there should be exceptions. As I mentioned to another poster, I have a "MUSIC" page, with a site link "mymusic.html", which you can only get to with a link/button clearly labeled MY MUSIC". Pretty absurd someone would go there and be surprised or annoyed at sample music being played there. Especially with a clear "fixed position" STOP MUSIC button. This policy is a case of overreaction to abusive practices. – Randy Jun 15 '19 at 23:28

16 Answers 16

98

Solution #1

My solution here is to create an iframe

<iframe src="audio/source.mp3" allow="autoplay" style="display:none" id="iframeAudio">
</iframe> 

and audio tag aswell for non-chrome browsers

<audio autoplay loop  id="playAudio">
    <source src="audio/source.mp3">
</audio>

and in my script

  var isChrome = /Chrome/.test(navigator.userAgent) && /Google Inc/.test(navigator.vendor);
  if (!isChrome){
      $('#iframeAudio').remove()
  }
  else {
      $('#playAudio').remove() // just to make sure that it will not have 2x audio in the background 
  }

Solution #2:

There is also another workaround for this according to @Leonard

Create an iframe that doesn't play anything just to trigger the autoplay in the first load.

<iframe src="silence.mp3" allow="autoplay" id="audio" style="display: none"></iframe>

good source for the mp3 file silence.mp3

Then play your real audio file at ease.

<audio id="player" autoplay loop>
    <source src="audio/source.mp3" type="audio/mp3">
</audio>

Personally I prefer solution #2 because it is cleaner approach for not relying so much in JavaScript.

Update August 2019

Solution #3

As an alternative we can use <embed>

For Firefox It seems that audio auto-play is working so we don't need the <embed> element because it will create double audio running.

// index.js
let audioPlaying = true,
    backgroundAudio, browser;
browser = navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase();
$('<audio class="audio1" src="audio.mp3" loop></audio>').prependTo('body');
if (!browser.indexOf('firefox') > -1) {
    $('<embed id="background-audio" src="audio.mp3" autostart="1"></embed>').prependTo('body');
    backgroundAudio = setInterval(function() {
        $("#background-audio").remove();
        $('<embed id="background-audio" src="audio.mp3"></embed>').prependTo('body');
    }, 120000); // 120000 is the duration of your audio which in this case 2 mins.
}

Also if you have a toggle event for your audio make sure to remove the created <embed> element for audio.

Note: After your toggle, it will restart from the beginning because the <embed> is already deleted and the <audio> element will play as normal now.

$(".toggle-audio").on('click', function(event) {
    audioPlaying = !audioPlaying;
    $("#background-audio").remove();

    clearInterval(backgroundAudio);
    if (audioPlaying){
        $(".audio1").play();
        // play audio 
    }
    else {
        $(".audio1").pause();
    }

And now make sure to hide these <audio> and <embed> elements

audio, embed {
    position: absolute;
    z-index: -9999;
}

Note: diplay: none and visibility: hidden will make the <embed> element not work.

| improve this answer | |
  • How do you make the audio loop? – Kwarrtz Aug 18 '18 at 4:34
  • 1
    Solution 2 worked for me. Sidenote: if you're working for web and Phonegap at the same time, Phonegap doesn't need this workaround and it actually takes it quite bad. So if you have a common codebase for web and Phonegap, make sure you find a way to apply this workaround on web only. – Ignacio Segura Nov 30 '18 at 10:14
  • 2
    The link to the silence file is dead, so I found some other silence files on GitHub: github.com/anars/blank-audio . I'm using 1-second-of-silence.mp3 for my project, but any file in this collection would work, I guess. – Travis Dec 19 '18 at 19:10
  • 9
    Seems busted as of Chrome 76. – mightyiam Jul 31 '19 at 4:34
  • 1
    Yeah, this doesn't work anymore (if it did work in the past) – Yulian Aug 1 '19 at 13:58
26

There is a really neat trick to use the autoplay-function of the audio tag in chrome.

Add

<iframe src="silence.mp3" allow="autoplay" id="audio"></iframe>

whereas silence.mp3 only is 0.5 seconds of silence.

This

<audio id="player" autoplay controls><source src="0.mp3" type="audio/mp3"></audio>

works afterwards.

Chrome notices that a sound has been played and gives the permission for autoplay in audio tags.

| improve this answer | |
13

As of April 2018, Chrome's autoplay policies changed:

"Chrome's autoplay policies are simple:

  • Muted autoplay is always allowed.

Autoplay with sound is allowed if:

  • User has interacted with the domain (click, tap, etc.).
  • On desktop, the user's Media Engagement Index threshold has been crossed, meaning the user has previously play video with sound.
  • On mobile, the user has added the site to his or her home screen.

Also

  • Top frames can delegate autoplay permission to their iframes to allow autoplay with sound. "

Chrome's developer site has more information, including some programming examples, which can be found here: https://developers.google.com/web/updates/2017/09/autoplay-policy-changes

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    so you are saying there not way we can autoplay the audio in chrome browser? – Akshay Rathod May 24 '18 at 6:03
  • Also, there is a permissions option in Chrome Browser in Android now that the user can select to allow sounds in autoplay – zeta Aug 20 '19 at 3:25
8

Just add this small script as depicted in https://developers.google.com/web/updates/2017/09/autoplay-policy-changes#webaudio

<head>
<script>
window.onload = function() {
  var context = new AudioContext();
}
</script>
</head>

Than this will work as you want:

<audio autoplay>
      <source src="hal_9000_sorry_dave.mp3">
</audio>
| improve this answer | |
  • Can you send me a fiddle for this implementation? It'll be really helpful – Vikash Aug 8 '19 at 21:40
  • 3
    It no longer works? Got this message: "The AudioContext was not allowed to start. It must be resumed (or created) after a user gesture on the page. developers.google.com/web/updates/2017/09/…" – thdoan Sep 9 '19 at 5:55
  • Working on Chrome 81.0.4044.138 on mac 👍 – Mosh Feu May 9 at 19:22
  • Currently doesnt work on Firefox – FamousSnake Jun 28 at 7:20
  • not working on chrome – Jayesh Jul 22 at 11:24
4

At least you can use this:

document.addEventListener('click', musicPlay);
function musicPlay() {
    document.getElementById('ID').play();
    document.removeEventListener('click', musicPlay);
}

The music starts when the user clicks anywhere at the page.

It removes also instantly the EventListener, so if you use the audio controls the user can mute or pause it and the music doesn't start again when he clicks somewhere else..

| improve this answer | |
  • This I believe is on the right track, of obeying the new policies requiring SOME user interaction to play music. I've added this to the touch event I've already added for mobile browsers, and a "sometimes working" onscroll event. Unfortunately the "no play()" policy doesn't seem to let a mousewheel scroll count as a user interaction, but I'm working on that too. The thing is, my page is a MUSIC page, literally called "mymusic.html", which you get to following a well labeled MUSIC button. So if ever there was a page to justify 'play 'on load', that one really should! – Randy Jun 15 '19 at 0:00
  • @Randy I am on a very similar situation, I am working on a music page and want to implement autoplay. Adding the autoplay attribute worked very inconsistently - the same code works occasionally, but not always. I have no console or network errors. Did you solve your situation? – Lazarus Rising Mar 14 at 11:38
  • @LazarusRising - While this all seemed to start with phone browsers, I'm noticing newer versions of desktop browsers rejecting autoplay too. I have to say though, I'm satisfied with the need to have an event triggered by user interaction start the music. In fact even I, as the page author, am beginning to find myself annoyed going to my page and having music start just because I touched the screen. I'm starting to see the logic of why auto-play is being phased out. And since its starting to happen universally, I don't feel like my site is the only one that can't do it. – Randy Mar 15 at 21:49
  • Chrome throws violation for forcing play. – Gabriel Petersson Jul 28 at 11:28
2

The browsers have changed their privacy to autoplay video or audio due to Ads which is annoying. So you can just trick with below code.

You can put any silent audio in the iframe.

<iframe src="youraudiofile.mp3" type="audio/mp3" allow="autoplay" id="audio" style="display:none"></iframe>
<audio autoplay>
    <source src="youraudiofile.mp3" type="audio/mp3">
</audio>

Just add an invisible iframe with an .mp3 as its source and allow="autoplay" before the audio element. As a result, the browser is tricked into starting any subsequent audio file. Or autoplay a video that isn’t muted.

| improve this answer | |
1

You may simply use (.autoplay = true;) as following (tested on Chrome Desktop):

<audio id="audioID" loop> <source src="path/audio.mp3"  type="audio/mp3"></audio>

<script>
var myaudio = document.getElementById("audioID").autoplay = true;
</script>

If you need to add stop/play buttons:

<button onclick="play()" type="button">playbutton</button>
<button onclick="stop()" type="button">stopbutton</button>

<audio id="audioID" autoplay loop> <source src="path/audio.mp3"  type="audio/mp3"> 
</audio>

<script>
var myaudio = document.getElementById("audioID");

function play() { 
return myaudio.play(); 
};

function stop() {
return myaudio.pause(); 
};
</script>

If you want stop/play to be one single button:

<button onclick="PlayStop()" type="button">button</button>


<audio id="audioID" autoplay loop> <source src="path/audio.mp3"  type="audio/mp3"> 
</audio>

<script>
var myaudio = document.getElementById("audioID");

function PlayStop() { 
return myaudio.paused ? myaudio.play() : myaudio.pause();
};
</script>

If you want to display stop/play on the same button:

<button onclick="PlayStop()" type="button">Play</button>


<audio id="audioID" autoplay loop> <source src="path/audio.mp3"  type="audio/mp3"> 
</audio>

<script>
var myaudio = document.getElementById("audioID");

function PlayStop() { 
if (elem.innerText=="Play") {
    elem.innerText = "Stop";
}
else {
    elem.innerText = "Play";
}
return myaudio.paused ? myaudio.play() : myaudio.pause();
};`
</script>

In some browsers audio may doesn't work correctly, so as a trick try adding iframe before your code:

<iframe src="dummy.mp3" allow="autoplay" id="audio" style="display:none"></iframe>

<button onclick="PlayStop()" type="button">Play</button>


<audio id="audioID" autoplay loop> <source src="path/audio.mp3"  type="audio/mp3"> 
</audio>

<script>
var myaudio = document.getElementById("audioID");

function button() { 
if (elem.innerText=="Play") {
    elem.innerText = "Stop";
}
else {
    elem.innerText = "Play";
}
return myaudio.paused ? myaudio.play() : myaudio.pause();
};
</script>
| improve this answer | |
0

Google changed their policies last month regarding auto-play inside Chrome. Please see this announcement.

They do, however, allow auto-play if you are embedding a video and it is muted. You can add the muted property and it should allow the video to start playing.

<video autoplay controls muted>
  <source src="movie.mp4" type="video/mp4">
  <source src="movie.ogg" type="video/ogg">
  Your browser does not support the video tag.
</video>
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    i want audio to play in background. – Akshay Rathod May 24 '18 at 6:02
  • 12
    Muted audio autoplay can't be considered an answer. – mightyiam Jul 4 '19 at 11:42
  • @Akshay Rathod did u find solutions? – The Dead Man Sep 12 '19 at 21:32
0

I've been banging away at this today, and I just wanted to add a little curiosum that I discovered to the discussion.

Anyway, I've gone off of this:

<iframe src="silence.mp3" allow="autoplay" id="audio" style="display:none"></iframe>
<audio id="audio" autoplay>
  <source src="helloworld.mp3">
</audio>

This:

<audio id="myAudio" src="helloworld.mp3"></audio>
<script type="text/javascript">
  document.getElementById("myAudio").play();
</script>

And finally this, a "solution" that is somewhat out of bounds if you'd rather just generate your own thing (which we do):

<script src='https://code.responsivevoice.org/responsivevoice.js'></script>
<input onclick='responsiveVoice.speak("Hello World");' type='button' value='Play' />

The discovery I've made and also the truly funny (strange? odd? ridiculous?) part is that in the case of the former two, you can actually beat the system by giving f5 a proper pounding; if you hit refresh repetetively very rapidly (some 5-10 times ought to do the trick), the audio will autoplay and then it will play a few times upon a sigle refresh only to return to it's evil ways. Fantastic!

In the announcement from Google it says that for media files to play "automatically", an interaction between the user and the site must have taken place. So the best "solution" that I've managed to come up with thus far is to add a button, rendering the playing of files less than automatic, but a lot more stable/reliable.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Relying on a user interaction is not autoplay. – mightyiam Jul 4 '19 at 11:41
-1

i used pixi.js and pixi-sound.js to achieve the auto play in chrome and firefox.

<script>

            PIXI.sound.Sound.from({
            url: 'audios/tuto.mp3',
            loop:true,
            preload: true,
            loaded: function(err, sound) {
                    sound.play();

            document.querySelector("#paused").addEventListener('click', function() {
            const paused = PIXI.sound.togglePauseAll();

            this.className = this.className.replace(/\b(on|off)/g, '');
            this.className += paused ? 'on' : 'off';

            });
            }
            });

</script>

HTML:

<button class="btn1 btn-lg off" id="paused">
    <span class="glyphicon glyphicon-pause off"></span>
    <span class="glyphicon glyphicon-play on"></span>
</button>

it also works on mobile devices but user have to touch somewhere on the screen to trigger the sound.

| improve this answer | |
-1

Use iframe instead:

<iframe id="stream" src="YOUTSOURCEAUDIOORVIDEOHERE" frameborder="0"></iframe>
| improve this answer | |
-1

temp fix

$(document).on('click', "#buttonStarter", function(evt)
{
var context = new AudioContext();
document.getElementById('audioPlayer').play();
$("#buttonStarter").hide()
$("#Game").show()
});

Or use a custom player to trigger play http://zohararad.github.io/audio5js/

Note : Autoplay will be renabled in 31 December

| improve this answer | |
  • This is not an answer, because it's not autoplay. – mightyiam Jul 4 '19 at 11:46
  • @mightyiam this is a workaround since there is no way to autoplay since chrome blocked it – Youssef KH Jul 18 '19 at 23:13
-1

I add controls attribute too tag audio, and simply hide it in CSS. And all works fine in Chrome.

<audio autoplay loop controls id="playAudio">
  <source src="audio/source.mp3">
</audio>
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Perhaps if your MEI for that site allows autoplay. Otherwise, I don't see a reason that this would work. – mightyiam Jul 4 '19 at 11:45
-1

Solution without using iframe, or javascript:

<embed src="silence.mp3" type="audio/mp3" autostart="true" hidden="true">
        <audio id="player" autoplay controls><source src="source/audio.mp3" type="audio/mp3"></audio>

With this solution, the open/save dialog of Internet Explorer is also avoided.

   <embed src="http://deinesv.cf/silence.mp3" type="audio/mp3" autostart="true" hidden="true">
        <audio id="player" autoplay controls><source src="https://freemusicarchive.org/file/music/ccCommunity/Mild_Wild/a_Alright_Okay_b_See_Through/Mild_Wild_-_Alright_Okay.mp3" type="audio/mp3"></audio>

| improve this answer | |
-2

You could use <iframe src="link/to/file.mp3" allow="autoplay">, if the origin has an autoplay permission. More info here.

| improve this answer | |
  • it is showing controls and i don't want anything on the page. just play and pause button. – Akshay Rathod May 24 '18 at 5:57
  • and how to loop the audio? – Akshay Rathod May 24 '18 at 6:17
  • @AkshayRathod please check HTML <audio> loop Attribute. Whereas, In XHTML, attribute minimization is forbidden, and the loop attribute must be defined as <audio loop="loop">. – hmd May 28 '19 at 15:54
-4

The default HTML5 audio autoplay attribute is not working in chrome, but you can force audio autoplay using JavaScript. Try this:

document.getElementById('myAudio').play();

This works for me.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    it's not that autoplay "doesn't work", it's that it's subject to a policy where the autoplay if will not work if the policy requirements are not met. See developers.google.com/web/updates/2017/09/… . This code will not circumvent that policy. If it worked for you, it's because you met the threshold and/or set some developer flag. But as that page says, you cannot assume that it will work for everyone. – ADyson Mar 6 '19 at 15:11
  • At least in FF 66, this won't work either. The new policy is to block the play() if it wasn't somehow triggered by a user interaction. – Randy Jun 14 '19 at 23:32

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