3

I have an interesting problem, I need to convert an int to a decimal.

So for example given:

int number = 2423;
decimal convertedNumber = Int2Dec(number,2);
// decimal should equal 24.23

decimal convertedNumber2 = Int2Dec(number,3);
// decimal should equal 2.423

I have played around, and this function works, I just hate that I have to create a string and convert it to a decimal, it doesn't seem very efficient:

decimal IntToDecConverter(int number, int precision)
{
   decimal percisionNumber = Convert.ToDecimal("1".PadRight(precision+1,'0'));
   return Convert.ToDecimal(number / percisionNumber);
}
  • 1
    Are you looking for pow (i.e. exponentiation)? – tkausl May 23 '18 at 14:13
  • Just change precisionNumber to double percisionNumber = Math.Pow(10, precision); – Glorin Oakenfoot May 23 '18 at 14:15
  • Your expected outputs seem to be (mathematically) wrong? Converting 2423 with two places of precision should yield 2423.00 and with three places 2423.000!? – Georg Patscheider May 23 '18 at 14:17
  • FYI: did a little performance test and on my machine with a for loop from 0 to int.MaxValue - JonH's solution took 352112ms while Dmitry Bychenko's only took 19646ms to complete – Rand Random May 23 '18 at 14:32
  • @GeorgPatscheider normally I would agree with you, but in this case, we have this old storage mechanism, which stores the value 24.23 like this 2423, but then has a schema that tells us where to put the decimal place – Mike Jones May 23 '18 at 15:20
10

Since you are trying to make the number smaller couldn't you just divide by 10 (1 decimal place), 100 (2 decimal places), 1000 (3 decimal places), etc.

Notice the pattern yet? As we increase the digits to the right of the decimal place we also increase the initial value being divided (10 for 1 digit after the decimal place, 100 for 2 digits after the decimal place, etc.) by ten times that.

So the pattern signifies we are dealing with a power of 10 (Math.Pow(10, x)).

Given an input (number of decimal places) make the conversion based on that.

Example:

int x = 1956;
int powBy=3;

decimal d = x/(decimal)Math.Pow(10.00, powBy);
//from 1956 to 1.956 based on powBy

With that being said, wrap it into a function:

decimal IntToDec(int x, int powBy)
 {
  return x/(decimal)Math.Pow(10.00, powBy);
 }

Call it like so:

decimal d = IntToDec(1956, 3);

Going the opposite direction

You could also do the opposite if someone stated they wanted to take a decimal like 19.56 and convert it to an int. You'd still use the Pow mechanism but instead of dividing you would multiply.

double d=19.56;
int powBy=2;
double n = d*Math.Pow(10, powBy);
  • did a little performance test and on my machine with a for loop from 0 to int.MaxValue - your solution took 352112ms while Dmitry Bychenko's only took 19646ms to complete – Rand Random May 23 '18 at 14:33
  • Right he used what came with the framework - so his solution is better. – JonH May 23 '18 at 14:36
  • Thought it would be faster, but never expected it to be 17 times as fast as yours. – Rand Random May 23 '18 at 14:37
  • @RandRandom - Sometimes readability is more important than performance. I believe my solution tends to be easier to read and understand. – JonH May 23 '18 at 14:39
7

You can try create decimal explictly with the constructor which has been specially designed for this:

public static decimal IntToDecConverter(int number, int precision) {
  return new decimal(Math.Abs(number), 0, 0, number < 0, (byte)precision);
}

E.g.

Console.WriteLine(IntToDecConverter(2423, 2));
Console.WriteLine(IntToDecConverter(1956, 3));

Outcome:

24.23
1.956
  • did a little performance test and on my machine with a for loop from 0 to int.MaxValue - JonH's solution took 352112ms while yours only took 19646ms to complete – Rand Random May 23 '18 at 14:34
1

Moving the decimal point like that is just a function of multiplying/dividing by a power of 10.

So this function would work:

decimal IntToDecConverter(int number, int precision)
{
    // -1 flips the number so its a fraction; same as dividing below
    decimal factor = (decimal)Math.Pow(10, -1*precision)
    return number * factor;
}
0

number/percisionNumber will give you an integer which you then convert to decimal.

Try...

return Convert.ToDecimal(number) / percisionNumber;
0

Convert your method like as below

public static decimal IntToDecConverter(int number, int precision)
{
   return = number / ((decimal)(Math.Pow(10, precision)));
}

Check the live fiddle here.

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