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I am trying to understand the concept of dynamic memory allocation. I have written some code that dynamically allocates an array of structs. The struct name is data and contains name and roll number. It asks user how many times you want to enter. After entering data it is supposed to search the data according to roll number. It crashes when searching for a particular roll number. Below is the code.

struct data
    {
        char name[50];
        int roll; float cgpa; char camp[3]; 

    };
    int main()
    {

        data *p;

        int i;
        cout << "how many times you want to enter data? "; cin >> i;
        p = new data[i];

        for (int k = 0; k < i; k++)

        {

            cout << "Enter your name:";
            cin >> p[k].name;

            cout << "Enter your roll number:";
            cin >> p[k].roll;

            cout << endl<<endl;
            p++;
        }
        int r;
        cout << "enter roll number to search for :"; cin >> r;
        for (int j = 0; i < i; j++){

        if (p[j].roll == r)
        {
            cout << "Roll number:" << p[j].roll << endl; cout << "Name:" << p[j].name << endl;

        }
        else{
            cout << "Not found!" << endl;
            break;
        }
    }
        delete []p;
        return 0;
    }
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  • 1
    You should ask question properly instead of doing such a dirty hack. It hurts yourself.
    – user2486888
    May 24, 2018 at 9:14
  • 1
    Wrong, Both text and code are important.
    – user2486888
    May 24, 2018 at 9:17
  • 1
    @NickyC Yeah it might be but in this case you can interpret what i am asking for can't you??Wouldn't it be great if you can deal with this problem rather than to taunt.Come up with some solution to this. May 24, 2018 at 9:20
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    @MuzahirHussnain code only question arent very usefull either. Anyhow, text has been fixed and I can remove my previous comment May 24, 2018 at 9:22
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    Yeah I might be able to interpret what you are asking. But wouldn't it be nice if you ask question properly rather than visually obscure fellows on the internet from helping you??? Show some decency.
    – user2486888
    May 24, 2018 at 9:25

2 Answers 2

2

In this code:

for (int k = 0; k < i; k++)   

{

    cout << "Enter your name:";
    cin >> p[k].name;

    cout << "Enter your roll number:";
    cin >> p[k].roll;

    cout << endl<<endl;
    p++;
}

You are incrementing the pointer to access and the index to access the pointer from so you going to far in memory.

Either iterate by index or by pointer/iterator.

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p is the array. It points to the start of the data reserved by new Data[i].

As soon as you increment it, it doesn't point to the start anymore.

Just drop the increment p++ statement and it'll work.

By the way there is no need to delete it at the end of main. It'll be freed anyway.

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  • 1
    "By the way there is no need to delete it at the end of main. It'll be freed anyway." Really?
    – acraig5075
    May 24, 2018 at 9:20
  • @acraig5075: Yes. But depending on the context that might cause a report of leaking memory. May 24, 2018 at 9:21
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    if the data is allocated only once in the whole program and no allocation will ever be performed after the data should be freed you don't need to free BUT its a bad habit and there is no reason not to free
    – Tyker
    May 24, 2018 at 9:22
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    I would argue not freeing memory and deferring deallocation to program termination are two different things, even if the generated machine code are the same.
    – user2486888
    May 24, 2018 at 9:34
  • @Cheersandhth.-Alf, @Tyker, @NickyC - See why does the use of new cause memory leaks. Also, I recommend you read a beginners book on C++, such as Stroustrup's Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++ which very clearly states on p. 600 that not using delete causes a memory leak. You usually should not rely on OS-freeing.
    – user8701826
    May 24, 2018 at 10:23

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