17
var obj = new XMLHttpRequest();
console.log("Object.keys():",Object.keys(obj));
console.log("Object.getOwnPropertyNames():",Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj))
console.log("Object.entries():",Object.entries(obj))
console.log("JSON.stringify():",JSON.stringify(obj))

console.log("console.log:"); console.log(obj)

output:

Object.keys(): []
Object.getOwnPropertyNames(): []
Object.entries(): []
JSON.stringify(): {}
console.log:
XMLHttpRequest {onreadystatechange: null, readyState: 0, timeout: 0, withCredentials: false, upload: XMLHttpRequestUpload, …}

How can I create such an object in javascript, whose properties are only printed using console.log(obj), but not returned by any of the above functions?

I have already tried to create objects using constructor function, object.create() (with enumerable:false), Object.assign(), using getters, instatiating from a class, instatiating from an extended class e.t.c

5
  • Hii @Marinos An please check this fiddle. Is this what you want is ? Feb 5, 2020 at 9:19
  • Hi @JaydeepMor. No.
    – Marinos An
    Feb 5, 2020 at 9:45
  • The closest you'll get is with inherited getters, i.e. Object.create({get test() { return 1; }}). But no, XHR is a host object and the console can do with it whatever it wants.
    – Bergi
    Jun 2, 2020 at 10:29
  • @Bergi indeed the host object is receving a special treatment from the browsers, however such treatment can be reproduced using chrome object custom formatters
    – ehab
    Jun 3, 2020 at 6:50
  • After a long time I also came up with a close answer
    – Marinos An
    Jun 3, 2020 at 13:36

10 Answers 10

4
+50

This has to do with the WhatWG console.log specification:

How the implementation prints args is up to the implementation, but implementations should separate the objects by a space or something similar, as that has become a developer expectation.

The spec leaves the output format very vague and it's up to the implementation to decide what to print.

3

You can use the new data type called Symbol to create the keys for an JavaScript object.

Link: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Symbol

I have attached an sample code and you can see the output in console.

let nameSymbol = Symbol('name');
function Person (name) {
	this[nameSymbol] = name;
}

Person.prototype.toString = function toPersonString() {
	var symArr = Object.getOwnPropertySymbols(this);
	for (let sym of symArr) {
		this[sym.description] = this[sym];
		delete this[sym];
	}
	return this;
}

const dummyObject = new Person('random value');

console.log("Object.keys():",Object.keys(dummyObject)); // []
console.log("Object.getOwnPropertyNames():",Object.getOwnPropertyNames(dummyObject)) // []
console.log("Object.entries():",Object.entries(dummyObject)) // []
console.log("JSON.stringify():",JSON.stringify(dummyObject)) // {}

console.log("console.log:", dummyObject.toString()); //  {name: "random value"}

7
  • I don't think we have any direct way to convert properties from symbol to string, but we can overload the toString method and return the property names again. Feb 5, 2020 at 10:50
  • Can you update the code with what you've proposed. If console.log() prints the object properties as in case of XMLHttpRequest I guess the answer will worth the bounty.
    – Marinos An
    Feb 5, 2020 at 11:08
  • I have updated the code with a new approach. Now you just need to call toString method(or any method) and it will work. Feb 5, 2020 at 13:44
  • 3
    It's not same as XHR. The XHR instance does not have symbols. In this code, if one has to access the name property, it'll be like dummyObject1.toString().name and dummyObject1.name would give undefined.
    – vatz88
    Feb 6, 2020 at 6:56
  • 1
    This is not related to symbols or regular keys, this is more about instance properties against inherited properties.
    – ehab
    Jun 3, 2020 at 6:58
3

All the properties on an XMLHttpRequest instance are inherited properties, what i mean by that is that they don't exist on the instance itself but rather on its prototype chain.

This explains why

const x = new XMLHttpRequest()
// all these methods consider only instance properties (owned properties) and thats why they return empty results
console.log(Object.keys(x)) // []
console.log(Object.getOwnPropertyNames(x)) // []
console.log(Object.entries(x)) // []
console.log(JSON.stringify(x)) // {}


// however if you try this you will get the results you want

console.log(Object.keys(x.__proto__)) // will not return symbol keys
console.log(Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptors(x.__proto__)) // will return descriptiors of every property whether its symbol or not

// you can see these results also by logging the xmlRequest, and looking at its __proto__ property in the console

// i will be calling the XMLHttpRequest instance for short as xmlRequest

You can create such an object simply like this

class A {}
A.prototype.someProperty = 10
const a = new A()
// again if you try these you will get results like the XMLHttpRequest instance
console.log(Object.keys(a)) // []
console.log(Object.getOwnPropertyNames(a)) // []
console.log(Object.entries(a)) // []
console.log(JSON.stringify(a)) // {}

however when you try to console.log(a) you won't see the someProperty like you do with the xmlRequest instance, and this is expected, since it is an inherited property. The reason that you see these properties when you log the xmlRequest is that this object is recieving special treatment.

Luckily you can recreate such a special treatment using chrome custom object formatters, for this to work you have to enable custom formatters from chrome developer tools settings

window.devtoolsFormatters = [{
    header: function(obj){
        if (!(obj instanceof A)){
         return null;
        }
        // to get the exact results like the xmlRequest, you need to remove quotes from the object keys in the json string, can be done with a regex
        return ["div",{}, JSON.stringify(obj.__proto__)]
    },
    hasBody: function(){
        return false;
    }
}]

class A {}
A.prototype.someProperty = 10

console.log(new A()) // {"someProperty":10}

2
  • Thank you for the answer: I have pasted your code to a snippet, but when executing, it does not print {"someProperty":10}
    – Marinos An
    Jun 3, 2020 at 11:31
  • @MarinosAn did u enable chrome custom formatters from the settings in chrome dev tools?
    – ehab
    Jun 3, 2020 at 12:14
1

How can I create such an object in javascript, whose properties are only printed using console.log(obj), but not returned by any of the above functions?

One close solution I have found is the one below. This will print properties with console.log(obj). However obj is a Proxy.

On chrome console the result is the same as XMLHttpRequest output (with class being Proxy). On firefox console it a representation of the Proxy class, so it is not exactly the same.


    const obj = new Proxy({prop1:"value1", prop2: "value2"}, {ownKeys: _=>[]});

    console.log("Object.keys():",Object.keys(obj));
    console.log("Object.getOwnPropertyNames():",Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj))
    console.log("Object.entries():",Object.entries(obj))
    console.log("JSON.stringify():",JSON.stringify(obj))
    console.log(obj)

result:

Object.keys(): []
Object.getOwnPropertyNames(): []
Object.entries(): []
JSON.stringify(): {}
console.log:
Proxy {prop1: "value1", prop2: "value2"}

and console.log(obj.prop1) / obj.prop1="newValue" still works.

1
  • 1
    Interesting. This is probably the closest to what the xhr host object does.
    – Bergi
    Jun 3, 2020 at 13:57
0

Object.keys: Only gives object's own enumerable property.

Object.getOwnPropertyNames: gives enumerable and non-enumerable properties found directly in a given object.

Object.entries: give object's own enumerable string-keyed property pairs.

JSON.stringify: Only considers objects enumerable properties.


Creating your own such object

You can use Object.create which will create a new object, using an existing object as the prototype of the newly created object.

obj1 = {
  key1: 'some key'
};

var obj = Object.create(obj1);


console.log("Object.keys():",Object.keys(obj));
console.log("Object.getOwnPropertyNames():",Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj))
console.log("Object.entries():",Object.entries(obj))
console.log("JSON.stringify():",JSON.stringify(obj))

console.log("console.log:"); console.log(obj)

2
  • 2
    Try copy/pasting the code in the console of chrome and firefox. console.log does not print anything, in contrast to XMLHttpRequest
    – Marinos An
    Feb 4, 2020 at 13:00
  • 1
    I'm just guessing it's the browser which is doing some extra work to when it prints build-in objects. Like Arrays are Objects too but are printed differently.
    – vatz88
    Feb 4, 2020 at 14:57
0

It's because prototyping works in Javascript, this is the real reason.

When you create an Object Instance from a prototype, the properties inside __proto__ will not be shown (not enumerable properties)

For example, try:

function MyXMLHttpRequest(){};
MyXMLHttpRequest.prototype.name = "Edward"
var obj = new MyXMLHttpRequest();

console.log("Object.keys():",Object.keys(obj));
console.log("Object.getOwnPropertyNames():",Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj))
console.log("Object.entries():",Object.entries(obj))
console.log("JSON.stringify():",JSON.stringify(obj))
console.log("console.log:"); console.log(obj)
console.log(obj.name)

You will see:

console prints

2
  • The code provided does not reproduce the output on my example in which console. log() prints a non-empty object.
    – Marinos An
    Feb 5, 2020 at 8:25
  • Because i wasnt added the own properties. Feb 5, 2020 at 18:10
0

Why properties of an XMLHttpRequest object are only printable through console.log()?

That's not true

var obj = new XMLHttpRequest();
for(var key in obj) console.log(key);

Answer on the question from the description

How can I create such an object in javascript, whose properties are only printed using

  var obj = Object.create({ foo: "foo", constructor: function() {} });

If you want to hide property from for in you should set enumerable attribute to false for desired property:

Object.defineProperty(obj, 'foo', {
  value: 42,
  enumerable: false
});
1
  • Thank you for the answer: It is still printed by Object.getOwnPropertyNames()
    – Marinos An
    Jun 3, 2020 at 11:59
0

I think this is the most practical way .It would help you

class User {
  //this is a private field
  #name
  get Name() {
    return this.#name
  }
  set Name(val) {
    this.#name = val
  }
}

var obj = new User()
obj.Name = 'test'

console.log('Object.keys():', Object.keys(obj))
console.log('Object.getOwnPropertyNames():', Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj))
console.log('Object.entries():', Object.entries(obj))
console.log('JSON.stringify():', JSON.stringify(obj))

console.log('console.log:')
console.log(obj)
console.log(obj.Name)

this is its compiled code

function _classPrivateFieldSet(receiver, privateMap, value) {
  var descriptor = privateMap.get(receiver)
  if (!descriptor) {
    throw new TypeError('attempted to set private field on non-instance')
  }
  if (descriptor.set) {
    descriptor.set.call(receiver, value)
  } else {
    if (!descriptor.writable) {
      throw new TypeError('attempted to set read only private field')
    }
    descriptor.value = value
  }
  return value
}
function _classPrivateFieldGet(receiver, privateMap) {
  var descriptor = privateMap.get(receiver)
  if (!descriptor) {
    throw new TypeError('attempted to get private field on non-instance')
  }
  if (descriptor.get) {
    return descriptor.get.call(receiver)
  }
  return descriptor.value
} // Try edit message
class User {
  constructor() {
    _name.set(this, { writable: true, value: void 0 })
  }
  get Name() {
    return _classPrivateFieldGet(this, _name)
  }
  set Name(val) {
    _classPrivateFieldSet(this, _name, val)
  }
}
var _name = new WeakMap()
var obj = new User()
obj.Name = 'test'
console.log('Object.keys():', Object.keys(obj))
console.log('Object.getOwnPropertyNames():', Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj))
console.log('Object.entries():', Object.entries(obj))
console.log('JSON.stringify():', JSON.stringify(obj))
console.log('console.log:')
console.log(obj)
console.log(obj.Name)

this the result of the compiled version on chromium enter image description here

7
  • Than you for the answer. I can still see though the name property on the console. The question states that every console log should print no properties apart from console.log(obj) as it happens with XMLHttpRequest object
    – Marinos An
    Jun 3, 2020 at 12:02
  • sorry, I fixed it . I build a js6 class with private field. you can see also js5 format which is es6 compiled result Jun 3, 2020 at 12:48
  • But now console.log(obj) does not print anything.
    – Marinos An
    Jun 3, 2020 at 12:51
  • could you please tell me what browser you use to test? Jun 3, 2020 at 12:59
  • Chromium. FYI: I execute up to console.log(obj)
    – Marinos An
    Jun 3, 2020 at 13:00
0

This should do the trick.

var obj = Object.create({
    get name(){
        return 'I go only to console.log()';
    }
});
console.log("Object.keys():",Object.keys(obj));
console.log("Object.getOwnPropertyNames():",Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj));
console.log("Object.entries():",Object.entries(obj));
console.log("JSON.stringify():",JSON.stringify(obj));

console.log("console.log:", obj);
4
  • 1
    Which browser and version did you try this on? On my chrome and firefox I get console.log: {} at the end.
    – Marinos An
    Jun 3, 2020 at 13:52
  • I tried on chrome, also did you expand the last object? Since this is a get property chrome does not print it automatically, you can expand the object and invoke the property getter. Jun 3, 2020 at 14:08
  • I know, but with XMLHttpRequest instance you don't need to do this, and that's what the question is about.
    – Marinos An
    Jun 3, 2020 at 14:19
  • I tried in edge and it does show the value by default. As other answers have also mentioned, this can be a browser specific implementation. Jun 3, 2020 at 14:59
-1

You can do something like this:

Object.defineProperty(obj, 'key', {
    enumerable: false,
    value: '123'
});

Specifically, enumerable thingie hides the property.

For more info see this page: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Object/defineProperty

UPDATE:

The following approach (improved version of the above) seems to hide properties from all mentioned checks, though it is a little bit verbose:

var proto = {};
Object.defineProperty(proto, "key", {
    get: function () { return 123; }
});

var obj = Object.create(proto);

console.log(obj); // {}
console.log(Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj)); // []
console.log(obj.key); // 123
2
  • In this case Object.getOwnPropertyNames() returns non-empty array, with the properties
    – Marinos An
    May 24, 2018 at 10:34
  • In the updated case, console.log() also does not print the object properties. While in my example, console.log() prints the object properties.
    – Marinos An
    May 28, 2018 at 15:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.