6

In typescript, I can declare a generic function like so:

const fn: <T>(arg: T)=>Partial<T>

In this case, TypeScript can sometimes infer the type parameter of the function based on the actual parameters I pass it. Is there a similar way to define a generic object literal whose type parameter can be dynamically inferred based on its contents? Something like:

interface XYZ { 
  obj: <T>{ arr: T[], dict: Partial<T> }
}

I am aware I can make the entire interface generic like so:

interface XYZ<T> {
  arr: T[],
  dict: Partial<T>
}

but I want to avoid that, because then I would have to declare the generic type in advance whenever I am using the interface. For example

const x: XYZ

will not work. If I want to make the declaration general, I am forced to write:

const x: XYZ<any>

but this does not allow TypeScript to dynamically infer the specific generic type based on the actual contents of x

5

Ah, you want generic values as discussed in Microsoft/TypeScript#17574. As you note, they don't exist in the language except in the case of generic functions. You can go give a 👍 to that issue if you want, or discuss your use case if you think it's helpful.

Given the generic interface

interface XYZ<T> {
  arr: T[],
  dict: Partial<T>
}

I would just use this workaround: Make a generic function to verify that a value is XYZ<T> for some T, and allow type inference to actually infer T whenever it is necessary. Never try to declare something of type XYZ. Like this:

const asXYZ = <T>(xyz: XYZ<T>) => xyz;

const x = asXYZ({
  arr: [{ a: 1, b: 2 }, { a: 3, b: 4 }],
  dict: { a: 1300 }
}); // becomes XYZ<{a: number, b: number}>

The above usually works for me in practice. The pro is that it's "natural" TypeScript. The con is it doesn't represent the "I don't care what type T is" properly.


If you really want, you could define an existential type. TypeScript doesn't natively support these, but there is a way to represent it:

interface SomeXYZ {
  <R>(processXYZ: <T>(x: XYZ<T>) => R): R
}
const asSomeXYZ = <T>(xyz: XYZ<T>): SomeXYZ => 
  <R>(processXYZ: <T>(x: XYZ<T>) => R) => processXYZ(xyz);

The SomeXYZ type is a concrete type that doesn't care anymore about T, but holds a reference to XYZ<T> for some T. You use asSomeXYZ to create one from an object:

const someXYZ: SomeXYZ = asSomeXYZ({
  arr: [{ a: 1, b: 2 }, { a: 3, b: 4 }],
  dict: { a: 1300 }
}); // SomeXYZ

And you use it by passing a function that processes the held reference. That function has to be ready for XYZ<T> for any T, since you don't know what type of T a SomeXYZ is holding.

// use one
const xyzArrLength = someXYZ((xyz => xyz.arr.length))

The xyzArrLength is a number, since the function xyz => xyz.arr.length returns a number no matter what T is.

Existential types in TypeScript are awkward, since there's a lot of inversion of control going on. That's the major downside to this, and why I usually go with the less-perfect-but-easier-to-think-about workaround I presented first.

Hope that helps. Good luck!

EDIT: re-reading your question makes me think you’re actually asking for the answer I listed as a “workaround”. So, uh... use that? Cheers.

  • Interesting comments and work-arounds; I will try these. I also filed an issue on the TypeScript repo (github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/24375), but in light of your pointer to the other issue, I will probably just merge my issue with that – prmph May 24 '18 at 16:47
1
interface MyGenericObjectLiteral<T> {
  arr: T[],
  dict: Partial<T>
}

interface XYZ { 
    obj: MyGenericObjectLiteral<any>
}

Interface XYZ here will not be generic, just the subobject MyGenericObjectLiteral. It is actually just what you desired, except that it has a bit different syntax.

  • I am aware I can do it this way, but I want to avoid having to make the entire interface generic. – prmph May 24 '18 at 12:55
  • 1
    @Isaev But specifying "any" as the generic type means you lose the dynamic type inference – prmph May 24 '18 at 13:01
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    @prmph yep. There is no such concept as a generic object literal in typescript. Interfaces are intended to describe the object shape, and they may be generic, but you will have to specify T. – Kit Isaev May 24 '18 at 13:17
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    @ Isaev: But if it works for functions, that means there is no technical reason why it cannot work for objects. TypeScript may not support it now, but it could support it – prmph May 24 '18 at 13:23
  • @prmph agreed, this is rather a pitfall of TypeScript design than than a logically based thing. One of the worst impressions in my experience of TypeScript usage is constantly trying to guess what should be specified explicitly and what can be inferred automatically. – Kit Isaev May 24 '18 at 13:26

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