7

What's going on here?

>>> a = np.int8(1)
>>> a%2
1
>>> a = np.uint8(1)
>>> a%2
1
>>> a = np.int32(1)
>>> a%2
1
>>> a = np.uint32(1)
>>> a%2
1
>>> a = np.int64(1)
>>> a%2
1
>>> a = np.uint64(1)
>>> a%2
'1.0'

We suddenly get what appears to be a a string containing the float 1.0!?

>>> a = np.uint64(1)
>>> type(a%2)
<type 'numpy.float64'>

...though it turns out it's simply a float.

What's the philosophy behind this?

I understand that numpy wants to be stricter about things like types and typing rules in order to be more efficient than basic python, but in this case the downsides of returning a very unexpected result to the user (likely breaking their program) seems to far outweigh the slight increase in cost of just checking the sign of the modulus before wandering down this slippery path.

It's not too rare to be working with uint64 values. For example, if you ever load an image into a numpy int array and then sum it, you have uint64(s). On the other hand, it's extremely rare to ever mod anything by a negative number (I've never done it except to see what would happen), because you generally mod things you can count such as indices, and different languages/standards/libraries can each have their own idea of what the result should be.

All this put together leaves me rather confused.

  • 2
    Unable to duplicate in 2.7 or 3.6. – Stephen Rauch May 25 '18 at 1:43
  • 2
    I don't get the 'string' but I do get a numpy.float64 too, weird... (3.5-np=1.14.0 and 2.7-np=1.14.3) – Julien May 25 '18 at 1:49
2

We suddenly get what appears to be a a string containing the float 1.0!?

This is still a float64 - it just looks weird due to a bug in numpy 1.14.3, which is fixed in 1.15.0-dev.

You'd normally thing that there are only two ways to convert to a string - __repr__ (tp_repr), and __str__ (tp_str).

It turns out that in python 2, there's one more - tp_print. This is only called when outputting directly to the console or the interpreter.

It turns out we implemented this wrong for only the interpreter. It's pretty tricky to test interpreter behavior in the test suite!

though it turns out it's simply a float.

This is sort of by design - 2 is inferred to be np.int64(2), and coercing {int64, uint64} -> float64 (to not cause truncation). There are numerous issues about this, but it's tricky to fix.

  • Can you elaborate on "coercing {int64, uint64} -> float64 (to not cause truncation)" please? – Julien May 25 '18 at 2:32
  • 2
    What should int64(-1) + uint64(0) give? How about uint64(2**32 - 1) + int64(1)? There's just no good type to return here. – Eric May 25 '18 at 2:42
  • Given that people almost never mod by negative numbers, I would think it would be worth the minor effort to interpret 2 as an unsigned int in this scenario. – Apollys supports Monica May 25 '18 at 17:09
  • @Apollys: I think what you're remarking is that there is an obvious choice for uint64 <op> positive[int] - that's the part that's hard to fix. – Eric May 25 '18 at 17:48
  • Yes, unfortunately I don't have the proper low-level understanding of how numpy is implemented to appreciate this point (viz why it's difficult to implement the positive int coercion). Thank you for your information. – Apollys supports Monica May 25 '18 at 17:59

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