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I have read another question on stackoverflow, he said:

  • A closure is one way of supporting first-class functions; it is an expression that can reference variables within its scope (when it was first declared), be assigned to a variable, be passed as an argument to a function, or be returned as a function result.
  • Or, a closure is a stack frame which is allocated when a function starts its execution, and not freed after the function returns (as if a 'stack frame' were allocated on the heap rather than the stack!).

But I have also read MDN, it said:

A closure is the combination of a function and the lexical environment within which that function was declared.

I think they are totally different. But if MDN is right,

var a=1;
function printA(){
    console.log(a);
}

this code include a function printA() and its lexical environment(variable a), does it mean this code is closure? Or MDN is wrong?

  • Hard to answer it precisely, the above code snippet might or might not force the JS engine to create a closure depending on the given circumstances. But generally yes, printA would close over a in your example. – Matus Dubrava May 25 '18 at 12:43
  • printA has a closure to the outer a variable. Access to a can also be explained in terms of identifier resolution on the scope chain. – RobG May 25 '18 at 12:44
  • 1
    That "a closure is a stack frame" explanations seems totally off. – Bergi May 25 '18 at 13:14
3

MDN is correct, a closure is the combination of a function and its reference to its external environment (which allows it to access the contents of that environment). See also the Wikipedia entry. (Loosely speaking, a closure is a function that has a reference to its outer environment.)

The text you've quoted from elsewhere on SO seems slightly off, but concepts are hard to explain.

But if MDN is right,

var a=1;
function printA(){
    console.log(a);
}

this code include a function printA() and its lexical environment(variable a), does it mean this code is closure?

Yes. In fact, all functions in JavaScript are closures (or perhaps more precisely, all functions are associated with closures). That's how global variables work, because all functions are closures over the global lexical environment.


As an implementation optimization, a JavaScript engine can sometimes optimize away the function's link to the external lexical environment, such as here:

function double(a) {
    return a * 2;
}

Nothing in double refers to any identifer that isn't defined within the lexical environment created for the call to double, so smart engines can (and do) optimize away the link entirely. Other times, they can determine that only parts of the external environment are used and so only retain those, allowing others to be garbage collected.

  • Closure is a combination but no only a function, so I think it is a bit inappropriate to say a function is a closure. – Lasy May 26 '18 at 0:55
  • @Lasy - As I said, "loosely." But it's also literally true specifically in JavaScript; the [[Environment]] link is an intrinsic part of the function in JavaScript, just as much as its parameter list and code: tc39.github.io/ecma262/#table-27 – T.J. Crowder May 26 '18 at 6:55
  • I am confused. A function include Lexical Environment, so the combination of a function and the lexical environment equals to a functionn. A closure is a function? – Lasy May 26 '18 at 7:38
  • @Lasy - Conceptually, a closure is the combination of a function and the environment it's bound to. In JavaScript all functions are closures, and the link is built into them.. That may not be true in other languages. – T.J. Crowder May 26 '18 at 7:46
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It's a closure, and here's why. Suppose that you have this code on your page:

var a = 1;
function printA(){
    console.log(a);
}

Now imagine that your page contains an <iframe>. It's served from the same origin, so it has access to its parent window. Suppose that the page in your <iframe> contains the following code:

var a = 2;
self.parent.printA();

It would print 1 to the console, because even though your <iframe>'s script also defines a variable named a, the funciton printA() sees the a that was defined in its lexical context.

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