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I need to delete all numbers from a file except those followed by (ST|TH|[RN]D) (ordinal numbers). I'm not sure how to introduce an exception into sed like that (I know of [^] but that wouldn't let me give the string optional (ST|TH|[RN]D).

It seems that lookaheads might be the answer but my construction isn't working

s/[0-9][0-9]*(?!(ST|[RN]D))//g

Sample input:

12663 METRO CONDOMINIUM AS DESC IN INST# 200800031138 UNIT A
126TH AVENUE INDUSTRIAL PARK
13 AND 12-29-19
102-1st AVE CONDO

Just added the last one, and that is a doozy of input. I would really like to eliminate the preceding numbers but leave the ordinal. Revo's example worked pretty well. But this edge case is actually important to me.

Expected output:

METRO CONDOMINIUM AS DESC IN INST#  UNIT A
126TH AVENUE INDUSTRIAL PARK
 AND --
-1st AVE CONDO

Don't care about eliminating spaces. Can do that on my own.

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    Sed does not support look-arounds, which are a PCRE construct (Perl compatible regular expressions); sed only supports Basic and Extended regular expressions. – Benjamin W. May 25 '18 at 15:35
  • What tool might I use instead? Will the stated regex work? – malan88 May 25 '18 at 15:37
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    Could you add example input? Are the numbers on separate lines, or within text? As for tools, Perl comes to mind. – Benjamin W. May 25 '18 at 15:39
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    What would you like to output to be? – glenn jackman May 25 '18 at 15:44
  • Please add expected output. – revo May 25 '18 at 15:48
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Since sed doesn't have support for lookarounds you have to define each path using:

[0-9]+(([sS]([^Tt]|$)|[Tt]([^Hh]|$)|[RNrn]([^Dd]|$))|[^RNSTrnst0-9]|$)

Live demo

For case-insensitivity I included both upper and lower cases into bracket notations.

GNU sed command (POSIX ERE):

sed -r 's/[0-9]+(([sS]([^Tt]|$)|[Tt]([^Hh]|$)|[RNrn]([^Dd]|$))|[^RNSTrnst0-9]|$)/\1/g' file

Regex breakdown:

[0-9]+ # Match digits
( # Start of Capturing Group #1
    ( # Start of Capturing Group #2
        [sS] # Match S or s
        ( # Start of Capturing Group #3
            [^Tt] # If a character exists after S it shouldn't be T
            | # Or
            $ # Match end of line position
        ) # End of Capturing Group #3
        | # Or 
        [RNrn] # Match a letter from set
        ( # Start of Capturing Group #4
            [^Dd] # If a character exists after R or N it shouldn't be D
            | # Or
            $ # Match end of line position
        ) # End of Capturing Group #4
    ) # End of Capturing Group #2
    | # Or
    [^RNSrns0-9] # Match a letter from other than one in set
    | # Or
    $ # Match end of line position
) # End of Capturing Group #1
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  • This is a very confusing regex. Could you explain it slightly more? The dollar signs and [^T] and [^D] are throwing me. Also, needs support for ordinal 'TH'. – malan88 May 25 '18 at 15:56
  • Sorry, I'm going to add a breakdown. – revo May 25 '18 at 15:57
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    I can't imagine how the OP is looking at that regexp compared to the regexps in the other answers and thinking "yup, that's exactly the way I want my code to look!" but in any case - you should mention that solution is GNU sed only for -r. – Ed Morton May 25 '18 at 17:28
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    I did not downvote you or I'd have left a comment stating why. I certainly wouldn't downvote just because you didn't state the answer was GNU-only and the OP did ask for a sed solution so I can't fault you for providing one. You may notice my comment got an upvote so maybe the 2 things are related, idk. Yes, you're using a POSIX ERE but your answer requires GNU sed to execute it so I'm just stating the obvious that you should state that GNU sed is required so future readers don't waste their time trying it with non-GNU seds. – Ed Morton May 25 '18 at 17:56
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    @EdMorton Can we use ERE version with POSIX sed?! Anyhow, I updated to clearly state it. – revo May 25 '18 at 17:59
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Sed doesn't support look-ahead, but Perl does. However, your regex isn't quite right: In 123RD it matches 12 (because 12 is a sequence of digit that's not followed by ST or ND or RD; it's followed by 3).

You can fix this by adding adding [0-9] to the look-ahead:

perl -pe 's/[0-9][0-9]*(?!([0-9]|ST|[RN]D))//g'

Also, you don't need the inner capturing parens in the look-ahead group, XX* can be simplified to X+, and we want to exclude TH as well:

perl -pe 's/[0-9]+(?![0-9]|ST|[RN]D|TH)//g'

Sample output from your test input:

 METRO CONDOMINIUM AS DESC IN INST#  UNIT A
126TH AVENUE INDUSTRIAL PARK
 AND --
-st AVE CONDO

Note that the 1 in 1st was removed. This is because S does not match s. We can fix that by making the regex case insensitive:

perl -pe 's/[0-9]+(?![0-9]|ST|[RN]D|TH)//ig' test.txt
 METRO CONDOMINIUM AS DESC IN INST#  UNIT A
126TH AVENUE INDUSTRIAL PARK
 AND --
-1st AVE CONDO
2
  • Just use a non-backtracking quantifier: s/ \d++ (?!ST|TH|[RN]D) /igx – Borodin May 25 '18 at 17:40
  • @Borodin That also works, but I prefer to write backtracking-agnostic regexes where possible (i.e. regexes that work the same way whether quantifiers are greedy, non-greedy, or possessive) and in this case it's easily possible. Also, your code has two bugs: 1. Typo: You're missing a /. 2. \d matches more than just [0-9]; it matches all Unicode digit characters. You need /a to fix that. – melpomene May 25 '18 at 18:18
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Perhaps this will get you most of the way there: a sequence of digits not followed by an alphanumeric character or end-of-line

$ cat file
foo 1234 bar 32nd gaz 1234
1234hello

$ sed -E 's/[[:digit:]]+($|[^[:alnum:]])/\1/g' file
foo  bar 32nd gaz 
1234hello
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sed is for simple substitutions on individual lines (e.g. s/old/new/), that is all. For anything else you should be using awk. With GNU awk for multi-char RS, RT, and IGNORECASE:

$ awk -v RS='[0-9]+(ST|TH|[RN]D)' -v IGNORECASE=1 '{gsub(/[0-9]+/,""); ORS=RT} 1' file
 METRO CONDOMINIUM AS DESC IN INST#  UNIT A
126TH AVENUE INDUSTRIAL PARK
 AND --
-1st AVE CONDO
17
  • sed and awk should have been outmoded decades ago when Perl arrived. It is capable of everything that the older utilities can do plus much more perl -pe 's/ \d++ (?!ST|TH|[RN]D) /igx' myfile does the trick. – Borodin May 25 '18 at 17:38
  • @Borodin absolutely right. I wonder why that didn't happen? zoitz.com/archives/13 :-). – Ed Morton May 25 '18 at 17:54
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    @EdMorton Well, if people actually learned Perl and wrote good code in it (instead of being afraid of it and vomiting out horrible code), then the world might be a better place. Case in point: The code in the comic you linked to (s/:/g) has the same bug: There's a missing / in the replacement part. – melpomene May 25 '18 at 18:28
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    I think it's the sigils that upset people, which are essentially built-in Hungarian notation: it makes Perl code unusually rich with non-alphanumerics. Sorry about the error; I don't have a command prompt to hand to test stuff. There's a slash missing and the substitution should end with ...//igx. – Borodin May 25 '18 at 18:33
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    malan you never use awk+sed combined, and you don't need a book to learn what sed is for (s/old/new/). I totally disagree with @Borodins claim that perl scripts are more legible than awk scripts, my personally experience is that awk scripts are always clearer. I do agree with him that sed scripts to do more than s/old/new/ are more incomprehensible than perl scripts but you should not be using sed for that. Python or Ruby can handle the same things. The difference from the others is that only awk is available as standard on all UNIX systems, and has a tiny language JUST for text processing. – Ed Morton May 29 '18 at 13:55
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With sed and your input file

sed -E 's/(\<[0-9]+\>)//g' infile

output

 METRO CONDOMINIUM AS DESC IN INST#  UNIT A
126TH AVENUE INDUSTRIAL PARK
 AND --
-1st AVE CONDO
0

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 's/^/\n/;:a;s/\n([^0-9]+)/\1\n/;ta;s/\n([0-9]*(1st|2nd|3rd|[4-90]th))/\1\n/I;ta;s/\n[0-9]+/\n/;ta;s/\n//' file

Use a newline as a delimiter to parse each line. Insert a newline at the head of the line. If the string following the newline is not numeric, pass over that string. If the string following the newline is ordinal, also pass over the string. If the string following the newline is numeric, remove it. At the end of the line, remove the newline delimiter.

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