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I'm working with the following models in a django project. The effective relationship is that a District can have multiple Schools, a School can have multiple Students, and a Student may have multiple Cases.

class District(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=50)
    ...
    class Meta:
        permissions = (
            ('view_district', 'Can view district')
            ...
        )

class School(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=50)
    ...
    district = models.ForeignKey(
        District,
        on_delete=models.PROTECT,
        related_name='schools',
        related_query_name='school',
    )
    class Meta:
        permissions = (
            ('view_school', 'Can view school')
            ...
        )

class Student(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=50)
    ...  
    school = models.ForeignKey(
        School,
        on_delete=models.PROTECT,
        related_name='students',
        related_query_name='student',
    )
    class Meta:
        permissions = (
            ('view_student', 'Can view student')
            ...
        )

class Case(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=50)
    ...
    student = models.ForeignKey(
        Student,
        on_delete=models.PROTECT
        related_name='cases',
        related_query_name='case',
    )
    class Meta:
        permissions = (
            ('view_case', 'Can view case')
            ...
        )

A user may be assigned:

  1. a specific case
  2. a specific student (which would include all cases for that student)
  3. a specific school (which would include all students for that school, and thus all cases for the students at that school)
  4. a specific district (which would include all schools for that district, all students that attend those schools within that district, and all cases for students that attend those schools within that district)

Users (other than Admins) will only be able to view/edit/delete models for which they have been granted permissions. Admins will have the former permissions for all models as well as adding new models. Admins will ultimately "assign" who has access to what, groups seemed like a natural way to extend some of this functionality.

I'm aware that django provides no native support for instance-level permissions and as such I've already explored the django-guardian package. It appears to offer the functionality required for a specific instance and while I can create permissions individually for objects through the shell, I'm obviously wanting to build this functionality into the models.

Ideally when a model is created, a group (or permission?) will be available that users can be placed into such as

District | District1 | can view District1 
District | District1 | can edit District1
District | District1 | can delete District1
....
School | School1 | can view School1 
School | School1 | can edit School1
School | School1 | can delete School1

I think programmatically creating Groups for each object permission would be ideal? But then I would then need to remove those groups if the model is deleted? I also feel like groups may be overcomplicating the system and rather rely on programmatically generated permissions and avoiding groups outright? I really am looking for a some direction as I've never needed to create such a unique permission scheme. Any and all advice is greatly appreciated.

  • I suspect django's permissions are not what you should be using – Joran Beasley May 25 '18 at 17:42
  • Add a m2m relation to auth.User to each model, hide those fields from forms unless user.is_superuser and set users allowed to work with the particual instance that way? It's not pretty and kinda totally avoids the entire django permissions model. Then again, like this you could set 'permissions' from both ends: from the user's side and the different model instance's side. – CoffeeBasedLifeform May 25 '18 at 18:45

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