3

I have a database context that I'd like to filter so that the logged in user can only see items that they own. I only want to specify this filter in the database context so I don't have to try and maintain it across several places. The end result is to add a filter like this to my database context:

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder builder)
{
    base.OnModelCreating(builder);
    builder.Entity<Foo>().HasQueryFilter(f => f.OwnerId == getCurrentUserIdSomehow())
}

What I've tried:

My thought was to create a service that gets the currently logged in user like this:

public interface IUserProvider
{
    string GetUserId();
}

public class UserIdProvider : IUserProvider
{
    private IHttpContextAccessor _accessor;
    public UserIdProvider(IHttpContextAccessor accessor)
    {
        _accessor = accessor;
    }

    public string GetUserId()
    {
        var identity = _accessor.HttpContext.User.Identity;
        if (identity.IsAuthenticated)
        {
            return _accessor.HttpContext.User
                .FindFirst(ClaimTypes.NameIdentifier).Value.ToString();
        }
        else
        {
            return Guid.Empty.ToString();
        }
    }
}

Then, I can inject it during the ConfigureServices() method in Startup:

services.AddTransient<IUserProvider, UserIdProvider>();
services.AddSingleton<IHttpContextAccessor, HttpContextAccessor>();

Then, once I've injected that service into the constructor of my database context, my filter becomes:

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder builder)
{
    base.OnModelCreating(builder);
    builder.Entity<Foo>().HasQueryFilter(f => f.OwnerId == _userProvider.GetUserId())
}

This works, but is there an easier or cleaner way of doing this? It feels like there should be an easier way of finding the current user ID when constructing the database context.

I thought about injecting the UserManager service into my database context, but couldn't find a way to get the current user.

2
  • 3
    "This works, but is there an easier or cleaner way of doing this?" Nope. This is indeed the correct (intended) and cleaner way. – Ivan Stoev May 25 '18 at 18:23
  • 2
    I actually think that IUserProvider class is a tad overkill (unless I've missed something). I would just inject the HttpContextAccessor and use that to get the ID (_accessor.HttpContext.User.Identity) – jmdon May 25 '18 at 20:32

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